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1920 Census: A nation in transition

1920 Census: A nation in transition

Photo Credit: Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-100269

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Profile America: A public service of the U.S. Census Bureau... The national census next April will be the 23rd time this once a decade count has been conducted since 1790. The 14th census in 1920 marked a nation in transition. For the first time, there were more people living in urban areas than in rural surroundings. The U.S. population was just over 106 million. New York had more than five and a half million residents, while Los Angeles was home to fewer than 600,000. In the decade to follow, radio would burst onto the national scene, The Reader's Digest would begin publishing, and Charles Lindberg would fly solo across the Atlantic. At the decade's end, the stock market would crash, leading to the Great Depression. You can find these and more facts about America from the U.S. Census Bureau online at census.gov.

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