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economic census     industry ratios?
 


2007 Economic Census data are
available in American FactFinder.
See also the current Industry Statistics Sampler.


Data based on 2002 Economic Census Geographic Area Series and Subject Series reports. Table includes only establishments of firms with payroll. Nonemployers are shown separately. See the Key to Column Headings for definition of terms, how these measures are used, and links to other information. Use Go to industry detail buttons below or Search above to go to specific industries.
More
data

NAICS
code
Description Receipts: sales, revenue, or value of shipments Annual
payroll
per
employee
($)
Estab-
lishments
per million
residents
Total receipts
($ millions)
Receipts per estab-
lishment
($1,000)
Receipts per paid employee ($) Receipts per $ of payroll ($) Receipts per capita ($)
Go to industry detail 21 Mining 182,911 7,594 382,787 8.64 634 44,312 84

 

Note

These tables include establishments of firms with payroll. They do not include self-employed persons and other nonemployers, data for which are shown separately.

These data are derived from the 2002 Economic Census Geographic Area Series and Subject Series reports. Introductory text includes scope, methodology, non-sampling error, and confidentiality protection.

More data

The arrows in the left-hand column serve two different functions.

The down arrows for 2-digit NAICS codes let you drill down to the constituent 3-digit codes, and the down arrows next to 3-digit NAICS codes take you to tables of the 4-, 5-, and 6-digit codes that comprise them.

The left arrows next to 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-digit summaries take you to the Industry Statistics Sampler for that industry. The sampler includes a wide variety of figures about the industry, primarily from the 2002 Economic Census, but it also links to annual, quarterly, and monthly surveys, where available for that industry.

Total receipts (in millions of dollars)

Receipts include the total sales, shipments, receipts, revenue, or business done by domestic establishments (excludes foreign subsidiaries) primarily engaged in the activities of this industry during the reference year. Terminology and precise definitions used vary from sector to sector, but all are taken to represent the same concept of gross receipts. See http://www.census.gov/econ/census02/text/sector00/00rcptot.htm

Receipts per establishment (in thousands of dollars)
store size

An establishment is a single physical location at which business is conducted and/or services are provided, such as a store or plant. It is not necessarily identical with a company or enterprise, which may consist of one establishment or more.

Receipts per establishment is a general measure of store size.

If your business receipts are greater than the figure shown for your industry (adjusted for inflation since 2002), your store is larger than the average for this industry.

Receipts per paid employee (in dollars)
labor intensity

Paid employees consist of full and part-time employees who were on the payroll during the pay period including March 12 (except for construction and manufacturing, where 3 other dates through the year are averaged in). Included are employees on paid sick leave, paid holidays, and paid vacations. Salaried officers and excecutives of corporations are included, but proprietors or partners of unincorporated businesses are not included.

Receipts per employee provides a broad indication of how labor-intensive an industry is. A higher receipts-per-employee ratio indicates that an industry may have low overhead costs, and therefore can do more with fewer employees. The ratio may be lower in industries that use a large number of part-time employees.

Receipts per employee, as presented here, may not be a good measure for some seasonal industries outside construction and manufacturing, since only those employees on the payroll as of March 12 are counted in the denominator, even though sales are counted regardless of when during the year they occur.

If your business has a higher receipts per employee than the figure shown (after adjusting for inflation since 2002), you may be using your work force more efficiently than other businesses in your industry.

Receipts per dollar of payroll (in dollars)
productivity

Payroll includes all forms of compensation, such as salaries, wages, commissions, dismissal pay, bonuses, vacation allowances, sick- leave pay, and employee contributions to qualified pension plans paid during the year to all employees. For corporations, payroll includes amounts paid to officers and executives. Payroll is reported before deductions for social security, income tax, insurance, union dues, etc.

Receipts per dollar of payroll is an indication of labor productivity or labor-intensity. It has the advantage that, since both numerator and denominator are in current dollars, it is not as affected by inflation as other measures over time.

This ratio is sometimes inverted and presented as payroll as a percent of sales.

If your business has higher receipts per dollar of payroll than the average for your industry, you may either have an especially productive work force or unusually low labor costs.

Receipts per capita (in dollars)
market potential

Receipts per capita is the result of dividing total receipts by the U.S. resident population (288,125,973 as of July 1, 2002). This measure is most useful in industries that sell directly to consumers, or that provide services proportional to the size of the population.

To assess geographic variation, follow the left arrow on lines for individual industries to the Industry Statistics Sampler, where receipts per capita is shown for states.

If your community has a lower receipts per capita than the national average, it could reflect an underserved local population, representing a business opportunity. High receipts per capita could suggest high demand or merely oversaturation.

Annual payroll per employee (in dollars)
labor costs

Payroll includes all forms of compensation, such as salaries, wages, commissions, dismissal pay, bonuses, vacation allowances, sick- leave pay, and employee contributions to qualified pension plans paid during the year to all employees. For corporations, payroll includes amounts paid to officers and executives. Payroll is reported before deductions for social security, income tax, insurance, union dues, etc.

Annual payroll per paid employee is a measure of relative labor costs. It is an approximation of average salary, although it is reduced in industries with large number of part-time workers, and it may be inflated in seasonal industries where March 12 employment differs from average employment levels through the year.

If your business has higher average payroll per employee than the national average for your industry (adjusted for inflation since 2002), it may reflect that you have a highly specialized workforce.

Establishments per million residents
market saturation

Establishments per million residents is a measure of how many stores typically service a particular population. This ratio is the result of dividing total establishments by the one millionth of the U.S. resident population (288.125973 as of July 1, 2002). This measure is most useful in industries that sell directly to consumers, or that provide services proportional to the size of the population.

If your community has fewer establishments per million residents than the national average for this industry, it may mean there are opportunities for expansion.

  Questions?