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2012 NAICS: 44-45 - Retail trade




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Guide to All Census Bureau Data Sources for This Industry


Source & Description   Frequency Latest Data Geography Industry
Quarterly Financial Report (QFR)Quarterly4Q 2013U.S.Selected 3 digits
Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI)Quarterly4Q 2013States, counties, metro areasSelected 2- thru 4-digits
Retail E-Commerce Sales (ERETAIL)Quarterly4Q 2013U.S.Retail Trade total only
American Community Survey (ACS)Annual2012U.S, states, counties, places, metros, tractsSelected 2- thru 6-digits
Annual Capital Expenditures Survey (ACES)Annual2012U.S.Selected 2- thru 6-digits
Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS)Annual2011U.S., statesSelected 2-digits
County Business Patterns (CBP)Annual2011U.S., states, counties, metros, ZIP Codes, and island areasSelected 2- thru 6-digits
Information and Communication Technology Survey (ICT)Annual2011U.S.2-digits
Nonemployer Statistics (NES)Annual2011U.S., states, metro areas, countiesSelected 2- thru 6-digits
Statistics of U.S. Businesses (SUSB)Annual2011U.S., states, metro areas, countiesSelected 2- thru 6-digits
Business Expenses (BES)Every 5 years2007U.S.Selected 2- thru 5-digits
Economic Census (ECN)Every 5 years2012U.S., states, counties, places, metros, ZIP Codes2- thru 6-digits
Economic Census of Island Areas (IA)Every 5 years2007American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands2-thru 5 digits
Survey of Business Owners (SBO)Every 5 years2007U.S., states, counties, cities, metro areasSelected 2- thru 6-digits

Links to Economic Data for Programs Published on AFF


Program Series Table Title Data Years Available
County Business PatternsGeographic Area Series County Business Patterns 2011 2010 2009 2008
County Business Patterns by Employment Size Class 2011 2010 2009 2008
County Business Patterns by Employment Size Class for PR and the Island Areas 2011 2010 2009 2008
County Business Patterns by Legal Form of Organization 2011 2010 2009 2008
County Business Patterns for PR and the Island Areas 2011 2010 2009 2008
ZIP Code Business Statistics ZIP Code Business Patterns by Employment Size Class 2011 2010 2009 2008
Economic CensusAdvance Report Advance Comparative Statistics for the US2012 2007
Advance Summary Statistics for the US2012 2007
Comparative Statistics, 2007 and 2002 Comparative Statistics for the U.S. and States (2002 NAICS Basis) 2007
Geographic Area Series Comparative Statistics for the United States (2002 NAICS Basis): 2007
Economy-Wide Key Statistics for Employers and Nonemployers2012 2007 2002
Summary Statistics for ... States, Metro Areas, Counties, Places 2007 2002
Subject Series: Establishment and Firm Size Concentration of Largest Firms for the U.S. 2007 2002
Employment Size of Establishments for the U.S. 2007 2002
Employment Size of Firms for the U.S. 2007 2002
Legal Form of Organization for the U.S. 2007 2002
Sales Size of Establishments for the U.S. 2007 2002
Sales Size of Firms for the U.S. 2007 2002
Single Units and Multiunit Firms for the U.S. 2007 2002
Subject Series: Miscellaneous Subjects Sales by Class of Customer for the U.S. 2007 2002
Subject Series: Product Lines Product Lines by Kind of Business for the U.S. and States 2007 2002
ZIP Code Business Statistics Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the East North Central States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the East South Central States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the Middle Atlantic States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the Mountain States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the New England States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the Pacific States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the South Atlantic States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the West North Central States 2007 2002
Number of Establishments by Sales Size Range by ZIP Code for the West South Central States 2007 2002
Economic Census of Island AreasGeographic Area Series Comparative Statistics by Kind of Business 2007
E-Commerce Statistics 2007
Floor Space for Retail Kind of Business by Mall or Shopping Center Location 2007
Franchise Status for Kind of Business by Mall or Shopping Center Location 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Citizenship Status of Ownership 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Employment Size 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Ethnicity Status of Ownership 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Gender Status of Ownership 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Legal Form of Organization 2007
General Statistics by Kind of Business and Sales/Receipts/Revenue/Shipments Size 2007
General Statistics for Selected Kinds of Business by Mall or Shopping Center Location 2007
Sales by Kind of Business and Class of Customer 2007
Selected Expenses and Rental Payments by Kind of Business 2007
Share of Sales/Receipts/Revenue by Kind of Business Accounted for by the 4, 8, 20, and 50 Largest Establishments 2007
Nonemployer Statistics Nonemployer Statistics by Receipt Size Class 2011 2010 2009
Nonemployer Statistics Nonemployer Statistics for the US, States, Counties, Metro Areas 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007
Nonemployers by Legal Form of Organization for the US and States 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007
Survey of Business OwnersSurvey of Business Owners Firms by Ethnicity, Employment Size of Firm for U.S. and States 2007
Firms by Ethnicity, Receipts Size of Firm for the U.S. and States 2007
Firms by Gender, Ethnicity, Race for US, States, Counties, Pl, MA 2007

NAICS search results



Definition


The Retail Trade sector comprises establishments engaged in retailing merchandise, generally without transformation, and rendering services incidental to the sale of merchandise.

The retailing process is the final step in the distribution of merchandise; retailers are, therefore, organized to sell merchandise in small quantities to the general public. This sector comprises two main types of retailers: store and nonstore retailers.

1. Store retailers operate fixed point-of-sale locations, located and designed to attract a high volume of walk-in customers. In general, retail stores have extensive displays of merchandise and use mass-media advertising to attract customers. They typically sell merchandise to the general public for personal or household consumption, but some also serve business and institutional clients. These include establishments, such as office supply stores, computer and software stores, building materials dealers, plumbing supply stores, and electrical supply stores. Catalog showrooms, gasoline stations, automotive dealers, and mobile home dealers are treated as store retailers.

In addition to retailing merchandise, some types of store retailers are also engaged in the provision of after-sales services, such as repair and installation. For example, new automobile dealers, electronics and appliance stores, and musical instrument and supplies stores often provide repair services. As a general rule, establishments engaged in retailing merchandise and providing after-sales services are classified in this sector.

The first eleven subsectors of retail trade are store retailers. The establishments are grouped into industries and industry groups typically based on one or more of the following criteria:

(a) The merchandise line or lines carried by the store; for example, specialty stores are distinguished from general-line stores.

(b) The usual trade designation of the establishments. This criterion applies in cases where a store type is well recognized by the industry and the public, but difficult to define strictly in terms of merchandise lines carried; for example, pharmacies, hardware stores, and department stores.

(c) Capital requirements in terms of display equipment; for example, food stores have equipment requirements not found in other retail industries.

(d) Human resource requirements in terms of expertise; for example, the staff of an automobile dealer requires knowledge in financing, registering, and licensing issues that are not necessary in other retail industries.

2. Nonstore retailers, like store retailers, are organized to serve the general public, but their retailing methods differ. The establishments of this subsector reach customers and market merchandise with methods, such as the broadcasting of "infomercials," the broadcasting and publishing of direct-response advertising, the publishing of paper and electronic catalogs, door-to-door solicitation, in-home demonstration, selling from portable stalls (street vendors, except food), and distribution through vending machines. Establishments engaged in the direct sale (nonstore) of products, such as home heating oil dealers and home delivery newspaper routes are included here.

The buying of goods for resale is a characteristic of retail trade establishments that particularly distinguishes them from establishments in the agriculture, manufacturing, and construction industries. For example, farms that sell their products at or from the point of production are not classified in retail, but rather in agriculture. Similarly, establishments that both manufacture and sell their products to the general public are not classified in retail, but rather in manufacturing. However, establishments that engage in processing activities incidental to retailing are classified in retail. This includes establishments, such as optical goods stores that do in-store grinding of lenses, and meat and seafood markets.

Wholesalers also engage in the buying of goods for resale, but they are not usually organized to serve the general public. They typically operate from a warehouse or office and neither the design nor the location of these premises is intended to solicit a high volume of walk-in traffic. Wholesalers supply institutional, industrial, wholesale, and retail clients; their operations are, therefore, generally organized to purchase, sell, and deliver merchandise in larger quantities. However, dealers of durable nonconsumer goods, such as farm machinery and heavy duty trucks, are included in wholesale trade even if they often sell these products in single units.

Comparability


This 2012 NAICS code is comparable to the 2007, 2002 and 1997 NAICS codes.