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Congressional Districts Relationship Files (State-based)

These tables show the relationships between congressional districts and other geographies. Tables for the 108th through the 110th congressional districts show relationships between the congressional districts and the following (as they existed in Census 2000): counties or county equivalents, incorporated places and census designated places (including consolidated cities), county subdivisions (for 18 states), American Indian areas, census tracts, ZIP Code tabulation areas (ZCTAs), urban and rural population and land area, and school districts. Tables for the 113th congressional districts show relationships between the congressional districts and counties or county equivalents, incorporated places and census designated places (including consolidated cities), county subdivisions (for all states), American Indian areas, census tracts, ZIP Code tabulation areas (ZCTAs), urban and rural population and land area, and school districts, as they existed in Census 2010.

There are no tables for the single member states (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming) or for the statistically equivalent areas of non-voting delegates (the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands).

Note: For inter-censal changes to congressional districts, new tables are only generated for states with changes after the initial post-decennial redistricting. No new tables were generated for the 111th or 112th Congresses, for example, because no states made changes to their 110th Congressional District boundaries.

American Indian Areas by Congressional District

The U.S. Census Bureau tabulates and presents data for American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust lands. This includes the legally defined areas associated with both federally recognized and state-recognized tribes. The Census Bureau also tabulates and presents data for several statistical American Indian areas that are represented in the table. These include Oklahoma Tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, and state designated tribal statistical areas (known prior to 2010 as state designated American Indian statistical areas).

A federal American Indian reservation is an area that has been set aside by the United States for the use of one or more federally recognized American Indian tribes. Its boundary is defined by tribal treaty, agreement, executive or secretarial order, federal statute, or judicial determination. The Census Bureau recognizes a federal reservation as territory over which a tribe(s) has primary governmental authority. A state American Indian reservation is an area that a state government has allocated to a tribe recognized by that state, but not by the federal government. American Indian reservations are known as colonies, communities, Indian communities, Indian villages, pueblos, rancherias, ranches, reservations, reserves, and villages. American Indian trust land is an area for which the United States holds title in trust for the benefit of an American Indian tribe or for an individual American Indian. Trust land may be located on or off a reservation; however, the Census Bureau recognizes and tabulates data only for off-reservation trust land. Census data always associates off-reservation trust land with a specific federally recognized reservation and/or tribal government.

A state designated tribal statistical area (SDTSA) is a statistical entity delineated for a state-recognized American Indian tribe that does not have a land base (reservation or off-reservation trust lands). SDTSAs are identified and delineated for the Census Bureau by a state liaison identified by that state’s governor's office. An SDTSA generally encompasses a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of people who identify with a state recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity.

A tribal designated statistical area (TDSA) is a statistical entity delineated for the Census Bureau by a federally recognized American Indian tribe that does not have a federally recognized land base (a reservation or off-reservation trust land). A TDSA generally encompasses a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of people who identify with a federally recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity.

This table lists the American Indian area names alphabetically within each subject state and provides the congressional district code that relates to each area. If an American Indian area extends into other states, the area name is followed by (pt.). If more than one congressional district relates to the American Indian area, each congressional district code is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9).

This file is only available for the 113th Congress.

113th Congressional Districts

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Congressional Districts by American Indian Areas

The U.S. Census Bureau tabulates and presents data for American Indian reservations and off-reservation trust lands. This includes the legally defined areas associated with both federally recognized and state-recognized tribes. The Census Bureau also tabulates and presents data for several statistical American Indian areas that are represented in the table. These include Oklahoma Tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, and state designated tribal statistical areas (known prior to 2010 as state designated American Indian statistical areas).

A federal American Indian reservation is an area that has been set aside by the United States for the use of one or more federally recognized American Indian tribes. Its boundary is defined by tribal treaty, agreement, executive or secretarial order, federal statute, or judicial determination. The Census Bureau recognizes a federal reservation as territory over which a tribe(s) has primary governmental authority. A state American Indian reservation is an area that a state government has allocated to a tribe recognized by that state, but not by the federal government. American Indian reservations are known as colonies, communities, Indian communities, Indian villages, pueblos, rancherias, ranches, reservations, reserves, and villages. American Indian trust land is an area for which the United States holds title in trust for the benefit of an American Indian tribe or for an individual American Indian. Trust land may be located on or off a reservation; however, the Census Bureau recognizes and tabulates data only for off-reservation trust land. Census data always associates off-reservation trust land with a specific federally recognized reservation and/or tribal government.

A state designated tribal statistical area (SDTSA) is a statistical entity delineated for a state-recognized American Indian tribe that does not have a land base (reservation or off-reservation trust lands). SDTSAs are identified and delineated for the Census Bureau by a state liaison identified by that state’s governor's office. An SDTSA generally encompasses a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of people who identify with a state recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity.

A tribal designated statistical area (TDSA) is a statistical entity delineated for the Census Bureau by a federally recognized American Indian tribe that does not have a federally recognized land base (a reservation or off-reservation trust land). A TDSA generally encompasses a compact and contiguous area that contains a concentration of people who identify with a federally recognized American Indian tribe and in which there is structured or organized tribal activity.

This table lists the American Indian area names alphabetically within each subject state and provides the congressional district code that relates to each area. If an American Indian area extends into other states, the area name is followed by (pt.). If more than one congressional district relates to the American Indian area, each congressional district code is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9).

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by Census Tract

Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or statistically equivalent entity delineated by local participants as part of the U.S. Census Bureau's Participant Statistical Areas Program. The U.S. Census Bureau delineated census tracts where no local participant existed or where a local or tribal government declined to participate. The primary purpose of census tracts is to provide a stable set of geographic units for the presentation of decennial census data.

Census tracts are identified by a four-digit basic number and may have a two-digit numeric suffix; for example, 6059.02. The decimal point separating the four-digit basic tract number from the two-digit suffix is shown in printed reports and on census maps. In computer-readable files, the decimal point is implied. Many census tracts do not have a suffix; in such cases, the tract number is right justified and zero-filled. Leading zeros in a census tract number (for example, 002502) are shown only in computer-readable files.

Census tract numbers range from 1 to 9999 and are unique within a county or statistically equivalent entity. The code range in the 9400s is used for those census tracts with a majority of population, housing, or land area associated with an American Indian area and matches the numbering used in Census 2000. The code range in the 9800s was new for 2010 and is used to specifically identify special land-use census tracts; that is, census tracts defined to encompass a large area with little or no residential population with special characteristics, such as large parks or employment areas. The range of census tracts in the 9900s represents census tracts delineated specifically to cover large bodies of water. This is different from Census 2000 when water-only census tracts were assigned codes of all zeroes (000000); 000000 was not used as a census tract code in the 2010 Census.

This table lists alphabetically each county name and 3-digit Federal Information Processing System (FIPS) code and the census tract codes within that county. It then provides the congressional district that relates to each census tract. If an entire county is within one congressional district, the table will have the note "All Census Tracts." If more than one congressional district relates to a census tract, each district is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9).

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Counties by Congressional Districts

Counties and county equivalents (e.g. parishes and boroughs) are the primary legal divisions of most states. Most counties are functioning governmental units, whose powers and functions vary from state to state. In four states (Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia), one or more cities are independent of any county and thus constitute primary divisions of their states. The Census Bureau refers to these places as "independent cities" and treats them as the equivalents of counties for data purposes.

This table lists each congressional district in the state and provides the county name for each county that is contained within the district. A county that is only partially contained within a district is indicated by "(pt.)" following the county name.

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by Counties

Counties and county equivalents (e.g. parishes and boroughs) are the primary legal divisions of most states. Most counties are functioning governmental units, whose powers and functions vary from state to state. In four states (Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia), one or more cities are independent of any county and thus constitute primary divisions of their states. The Census Bureau refers to these places as "independent cities" and treats them as the equivalents of counties for data purposes.

This table lists each county name alphabetically within the state and provides the congressional district code that relates to it. If a county relates to more than one congressional district, each district is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6,7,8, and 9).

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by County Subdivisions

County subdivisions are the primary divisions of counties and equivalent entities. They include census county divisions, census subareas, minor civil divisions, and unorganized territories, and can be classified as either legal or statistical. Minor civil divisions (MCDs) are the primary governmental or administrative divisions of a county in 29 states (parishes in Louisiana) and Puerto Rico and the Island Areas. MCDs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Island Areas represent many different kinds of legal entities with a wide variety of governmental and/or administrative functions. Census county divisions (CCDs) are areas delineated by the Census Bureau in cooperation with state, tribal, and local officials for statistical purposes. CCDs have no legal function and are not governmental units. CCD boundaries usually follow visible features and usually coincide with census tract boundaries. The name of each CCD is based on a place, county, or well-known local name that identifies its location. CCDs exist within the 21 states where there are no legally established MCDs.

This table lists each county subdivision name alphabetically within the state and provides the county name and congressional district that relate to each county subdivision. If a county subdivision relates to more than one congressional district, each district is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9).

Note: Tables for all congressional sessions prior to the 113th include only the MCDs in 18 states. The tables for the 113th Congress include county subdivisions in all states.

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Neither Georgia or Texas have Minor Civil Divisions.

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by Places

Incorporated places recognized by the Census Bureau for Census 2010 data are those reported to the U.S. Census Bureau as legally in existence on January 1, 2010--under the laws of their respective states--as cities, boroughs, municipalities, towns, and villages, with the following exceptions: the towns in the New England states, New York, and Wisconsin, and the boroughs in New York which are recognized as minor civil divisions for decennial census purposes. Incorporated places recognized by the Census Bureau for Census 2000 were those reported to the Census Bureau as legally in existence on January 1, 2000. Incorporated places can cross both county and MCD boundaries.

Census designated places (CDPs) are delineated for each decennial census as the statistical counterparts of incorporated places. CDPs are delineated to provide census data for concentrations of population, housing, and commercial structures that are identifiable by name but are not within an incorporated place. CDP boundaries are usually defined in cooperation with state, local, and tribal officials. These boundaries, which usually coincide with visible features or the boundary of an adjacent incorporated place or other legal entity, have no legal status, nor do these places have officials elected to serve traditional municipal functions. CDP boundaries may change from one decennial census to the next with changes in the settlement pattern; a CDP with the same name as in an earlier census does not necessarily have the same boundary.

This table lists each incorporated place and census designated place name alphabetically within the state and provides the county name and congressional district that relate to each place. If a place relates to more than one county, each county name is listed. If a place relates to more than one congressional district, each district is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9).

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by School Districts

School districts are geographic entities within which state, county, or local officials, the Department of Defense, or the Bureau of Indian Affairs provides public educational services for the residents. The U.S. Census Bureau obtains the boundaries and names for school districts from state officials.

This table lists each school district alphabetically by name and provides the congressional district that relates to the area. If more than one congressional district relates to a school district, each congressional district is listed, separated by a comma or a hyphen (e.g. 6-9 represents congressional districts 6, 7, 8 and 9). If there are two different school districts in the same state with the same name, the county name is added in parentheses after the school district name to distinguish them.

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by Urban/Rural Population and Land Area

The Census Bureau classifies as urban all territory, population, and housing units located within urbanized areas (UAs) and urban clusters (UCs), both defined using the same criteria. The Census Bureau delineates UA and UC boundaries that represent densely developed territory, encompassing residential, commercial, and other nonresidential urban land uses. In general, this territory consists of areas of high population density and urban land use resulting in a representation of the "urban footprint."

Rural consists of all territory, population, and housing units located outside of UAs and UCs. Geographic entities, such as congressional districts, metropolitan areas, counties, minor civil divisions (MCDs), and places, often contain both urban and rural territory, population, and housing units.

This table provides the total population for each congressional district and the population of the district that is classified by the Census Bureau as urban and that part classified as rural. It also provides the total land area for the district and the land area that is classified as urban and that part classified as rural. Also included are the percentages of the population and land areas that are urban and rural within the district.

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts

Congressional Districts by ZIP Code Tabulation Areas (ZCTAs)

ZCTAs are generalized area representations of U.S. Postal Service (USPS) ZIP Code service areas. Since ZCTAs are NOT exact representations of the USPS' ZIP Code delivery areas they should not be used for mailing purposes. ZCTAs are distinct from other Census Bureau statistical areas, such as census tracts, because they are computer-delineated based on the location of addresses at the time of the Census rather than manually delineated by local program participants or Census Bureau staff before the census.

This table lists each ZCTA 5-digit code, numerically within the state, and provides the congressional district that relates to each ZCTA. If more than one congressional district relates to a ZCTA, each district is listed, separated

113th Congressional Districts

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110th Congressional Districts

Georgia  |   Texas

109th Congressional Districts

108th Congressional Districts


Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Geography | (301) 763-1128 |  Last Revised: March 29, 2013