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2010 Census Local Update of Census Address (LUCA) FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions February 2008

LUCA PROGRAM OVERVIEW

  1. What is the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Program?
  2. Why is participating in the LUCA program important?
  3. Why is accurate census data important to my government?
  4. Is my government eligible to participate in the LUCA Program?
  5. How has the LUCA program changed since LUCA 2000?

CENSUS BUREAU TERMS FOR THE LUCA REVIEW

  1. What is the Census Bureau definition of a housing unit?
  2. What is the Census Bureau definition of a group quarters?
  3. What types of housing units are acceptable?
  4. What types of group quarters are acceptable?
  5. What types of housing units and group quarters are unacceptable?
  6. What are the Census Bureau's definitions for residential and nonresidential addresses?
  7. What is the Census Bureau's definition for a city-style address?
  8. What is the Census Bureau's definition for a noncity-style address?
  9. What is a Census Tract?
  10. What is a Census Block?
  11. What are Census Bureau geographic codes?
  12. Why are Census Bureau geographic codes important?

THE CENSUS BUREAU'S ADDRESS LIST

  1. What is the Census Bureau's Address List?
  2. How was the Census Bureau's Address List created and how is it maintained?
  3. What is the Master Address File (MAF)?
  4. What types of addresses can we submit?
  5. What is the Census Bureau's predefined computer-readable format?
  6. What is the Address List Add Page?
  7. What is the Address Count List?

CENSUS BUREAU MAPS

  1. What is TIGER™?
  2. What types of maps are available for the LUCA program?
  3. What is the Map Sheet-to-Block Number Relationship List?
  4. What are shapefiles?
  5. What are the requirements for using the Census Bureau's shapefiles?

CONFIDENTIALITY AND SECURITY

  1. Why is the Census Bureau's Address List Confidential?
  2. What is Title 13, United States Code (U.S.C.)?
  3. What are the Confidentiality and Security Guidelines?
  4. Who is required to sign the Confidentiality Agreement?
  5. What is the penalty for violating Title 13, U.S.C.?
  6. Can we use the Census Bureau Address List for any purpose other than LUCA?
  7. What is a LUCA liaison?
  8. What is the Self-Assessment Checklist?

PARTICIPATION OPTIONS

  1. What are the LUCA participation options?
  2. What does Option 1 - Title 13 Full Address List Review allow participants to do?
  3. What does Option 1 - Title 13 Full Address List Review not allow participants to do?
  4. What materials are provided to Option 1 participants?
  5. What does Option 2 - Title 13 Local Address List Submission allow participants to do?
  6. What does Option 2 - Title 13 Local Address List Submission not allow participants to do?
  7. What materials are provided to Option 2 participants?
  8. What does Option 3 - Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission allow participants to do?
  9. What does Option 3 - Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission not allow participants to do?
  10. What materials are provided to Option 3 participants?
  11. In what formats are the LUCA materials available?

LUCA PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. What are the responsibilities of each option for participating in the LUCA program?
  2. What are the Census Bureau's responsibilities?

LUCA Program Overview

1. What is the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Program?

The Local Update of Census Addresses program, also known as LUCA, is a decennial census geographic partnership program that allows designated representatives of tribal, state, and local governments to review and update the Census Bureau's Address List that is used to deliver questionnaires for the decennial census. The LUCA program uses local knowledge to update the Census Bureau's Address List and maps. It is authorized by the Census Address List Improvement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-430).

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2. Why is participating in the LUCA program important?

Because the objective of the census is to collect a questionnaire from every address on the Census Bureau's Address List, the accuracy and completeness of the address list is critical to the accuracy and completeness of the census. Therefore, governments that participate in the LUCA Program help ensure an accurate decennial census for their communities.

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3. Why is accurate census data important to my government?

There are a number of reasons accurate census data are important to you. Census data are used not only to apportion seats in the House of Representatives but are used to appropriate federal monies in over 1000 programs administered by 26 federal agencies. Most of the funds for these programs are distributed by formulas that use census data such as total population, population by age group, gender, income, housing characteristics, etc. depending on the program. For instance, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Report to Congressional Requesters, published in June 2006, the top 20 federal formula grant programs together had over $300 billion in obligations to states of the total $460.2 billion obligated by over 1,100 federal grant programs in fiscal year 2004.

Census data also provides the statistical support for grant applications that fund community social, economic, and environmental programs as well as other needed community improvements and enhancements.

Census data helps your community to plan for future needs. For example, if census data reveals that your community has a growing number of individuals nearing retirement age, you may have a future need for more assisted living options.

The first step to getting accurate local census data is to get involved in the LUCA program.

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4. Is my government eligible to participate in the LUCA Program?

Your government is eligible to participate in the LUCA program if it is an active, functioning government including federally recognized American Indian Reservations, states, counties, incorporated places, or minor civil divisions (MCD).

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5. How has the LUCA program changed since LUCA 2000?

The 2010 Decennial Census LUCA Program offers a number of improvements:

  • One review cycle for all address types.
  • 120 calendar days for reviewing LUCA materials.
  • Comprehensive program communications, including periodic contact.
  • Three (3) program options.
  • The MAF/TIGER Partnership Software (MTPS) geographic information system (GIS) application that combines the census address list, address count list, and digital maps in a software package.

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Census Bureau Terms for the LUCA Review

6. What is the Census Bureau definition of a housing unit?

A single-family house, townhouse, mobile home, trailer, apartment, group of rooms, or a single room occupied as a separate living quarters or, if vacant, intended for occupancy as a separate living quarters. A separate living quarters is one in which one or more occupants (or intended occupants, if vacant) live separate from any other individual(s) in the building and have direct access to the living quarters without going through another living quarters, such as from outside the building or through a common hall.

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7. What is the Census Bureau definition of a group quarters?

A place where people live or stay, in a group living arrangement, that is owned or managed by an entity or organization providing housing and/or services for the residents. This is not a typical household-type living arrangement. These services may include custodial or medical care as well as other types of assistance, and residency is commonly restricted to those receiving these services. People living in group quarters are usually not related to each other.

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8. What types of housing units are acceptable?

The following types of housing units are acceptable:

  • Houses, including townhouses, condominiums, and apartments.
  • Living quarters within an otherwise nonresidential structure such as an apartment within a church, school, or business.
  • Mobile homes or trailers occupied as separate living quarters, or if vacant, intended for occupancy as separate living quarters.
  • Any housing units under construction that will be habitable (closed to the elements with final roof, windows, and doors) on Census Day, April 1, 2010.

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9. What types of group quarters are acceptable?

The following types of group quarters are acceptable:

  • Correctional facilities.
  • Juvenile facilities.
  • Nursing homes.
  • Hospitals with long-term care facilities.
  • College or university dormitories, fraternities, sororities.
  • Dormitories for workers.
  • Religious group quarters.
  • Shelters.
  • Group homes.
  • Any group quarters under construction that will be habitable (closed to the elements with final roof, windows, and doors) on Census Day, April 1, 2010.

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10. What types of housing units and group quarters are unacceptable?

Exclude the following unacceptable types of housing units and group quarters addresses from your address list:

  • Condemned or scheduled for demolition.
  • Being converted or remodeled for nonresidential purposes.
  • Used solely for nonresidential storage.
  • Used solely as offices or businesses in which no one is living.
  • Used solely for ceremonial purposes.
  • Any units under construction that will not be habitable (closed to the elements with final roof, windows, and doors) on Census Day, April 1, 2010.

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11. What are the Census Bureau's definitions for residential and nonresidential addresses?

The Census Bureau divides all addresses in two use types, residential and nonresidential. Residential addresses are addresses of housing units and/or group quarters where one or more persons could live. Nonresidential addresses are addresses of a structure or unit within a structure that do not serve as a residence, such as commercial establishments, schools, government offices, and churches.

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12. What is the Census Bureau's definition for a city-style address?

The Census Bureau classifies housing unit and group quarters addresses that have a house number and street name address, for example, 212 Elm Street or 137 Clark Ct., Apt. 316, as city-style addresses. In some instances, the house number may also include an alpha character such as 35A or W9254. These addresses are used for mailing or to provide location for emergency services, such as police, fire, and rescue (E-911 addresses).

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13. What is the Census Bureau's definition for a noncity-style address?

The Census Bureau classifies addresses that do not include a house number and/or a street name as noncity-style addresses. Noncity-style addresses also may not include a complete house number and street name address. Frequently used noncity-style mailing addresses include:

  • General delivery.
  • Rural route and box number.
  • Highway contract route and box number.
  • Post Office box.

Noncity-style addresses often do not follow any numeric sequence, and may not be associated with the name of the street or highway on which they are located. For this reason, the Census Bureau uses different methods to compile the list of addresses for inclusion into the Address List, such as location descriptions (BRICK HSE w/ATTACHED GARAGE ON RIGHT), structure points (geographic coordinates), and census geographic codes.

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14. What is a Census Tract?

Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical subdivisions of a county or statistically equivalent entity, delineated for presenting Census Bureau statistical data.

The proposed criteria for census tracts for the 2010 Census is that they contain a minimum of 1,200 people with an optimal population of 4,000.

Census tract boundaries are delineated with the intention of being stable over many decades, so they generally follow relatively permanent visible features. However, they may follow governmental unit boundaries and other non-visible features in some instances. Census tract boundaries never cross state or county (or statistically equivalent entity) boundaries.

Each census tract is uniquely numbered within a county and contains numerous census blocks. Census tract numbers contain up to a 4-digit number followed by a decimal point and a 2-digit number for suffixed tracts, e.g., 1234.01. For census tracts without a suffix, the number will contain a period with zero fill, e.g., 4567.00. Leading zeros are not shown on Census Bureau materials.

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15. What is a Census Block?

A census block is an area bounded by visible features such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks and nonvisible features such as the boundaries of governmental units and other legal entities. A block is the smallest geographic area for which the Census Bureau collects and tabulates statistical data.

Census blocks may look like a city block or may be large and irregularly shaped, depending upon features. The boundary of a state or a county is always a block boundary.

Census blocks are numbered within census tracts and are unique to the census tract to which they belong. Census block numbers contain a 4-digit number plus one alpha character, if applicable, e.g. 3001A. Suffixes, such as 2011A and 2011B, reflect boundary changes as well as added features.

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16. What are Census Bureau geographic codes?

Census Bureau geographic codes identify the geographic location of individual addresses. These codes include state, county, census tract, and census block codes.

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17. Why are Census Bureau geographic codes important?

Because the Census Bureau counts people where they live, census geographic code information or geocodes support the systematic collection of data that allows Census enumerators to locate an address. They are also important in allocating data from questionnaire responses to the correct location.

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The Census Bureau's Address List

18. What is the Census Bureau's Address List?

The Census Bureau's Address List is used to deliver questionnaires for the decennial census. It contains all of the residential (city-style and noncity-style) addresses known to the Census Bureau for your jurisdiction. It also contains census geographic codes (state, county, census tract numbers, census block numbers) that indicate the location of each address.

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19. How was the Census Bureau's Address List created and how is it maintained?

In preparation for Census 2000, the Census Bureau created the Master Address File (MAF) by merging the 1990 Address Control File with the latest version of the U.S. Postal Service's (USPS) Delivery Sequence File (DSF).

The Census Bureau's Geography Division regularly updates the MAF database from various sources. In addition to the USPS DSF, other sources of updates include current household surveys, special censuses, and local sources.

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20. What is the Master Address File (MAF)?

The MAF is a nationwide database of all addresses used to support many of the Census Bureau's operations. Besides containing mailing addresses and ZIP Codes, an address record in the MAF also contains geographic information about the location of addresses. In areas where there are noncity-style addresses (e.g., rural route or post office box number), the address record may contain additional information such as a location description.

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21. What types of addresses can we submit?

LUCA participants can submit city-style addresses only. Option 1 participants can comment on any city-style address on the Census Bureau's Address List using correct, delete, not in jurisdiction, and nonresidential action codes. Option 1 participants can also add city-style addresses to the address list.

Option 2 and Option 3 participants must submit their local address list files in the Census Bureau's predefined computer-readable format.

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22. What is the Census Bureau's predefined computer-readable format?

Option 2 and Option 3 participants must submit their local address list files in the Census Bureau's predefined computer-readable format. An address list template record layout is included on the CD-ROM for Option 2 and Option 3 participants. You may use this template to import your local address file for submission. This format contains 17 fields of information:

  1. Entity ID Code
  2. State Code
  3. County Code
  4. Census Tract Number
  5. Census Block Number
  6. Group Quarters Flag
  7. House Number
  8. Street Name Prefix Qualifier
  9. Street Name Prefix Direction
  10. Street Name Prefix Type
  11. Street Name
  12. Street Name Suffix Type
  13. Street Name Suffix Direction
  14. Street Name Suffix Qualifier
  15. Group Quarters Name
  16. Apartment/Unit Number
  17. City-style Mailing ZIP Code

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23. What is the Address List Add Page?

The Address List Add Page is used by Option 1 participants who select to receive the Census Bureau's Address List in paper format to add city-style addresses not shown on the address list.

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24. What is the Address Count List?

The Address Count List contains the count of housing unit and group quarters addresses for each census block within your jurisdiction. It can be used to compare address counts between the Census Bureau and your local address count. It is provided to all LUCA participants.

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Census Bureau Maps

25. What is TIGER?

Address records in the MAF are linked to feature segments in the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) database. The TIGERdatabase includes the geographic coordinates and names of all streets, water features, and other linear features, and boundaries for all jurisdictions and statistical areas (census tracts, census blocks, etc.) used to tabulate decennial census data. The TIGERdatabase also includes address ranges along streets that have city-style addresses and the hierarchy of census geographic area codes from the state level down to individual census blocks www.census.gov/geo/reference/hierarchy.html. By linking address records in the MAF to the TIGERdatabase, the Census Bureau is able to identify street segments along which an individual address exists and determine the geographic code that applies to that address.

The Census Bureau's Geography Division regularly updates the MAF/TIGER database from various sources. In addition to the USPS DSF, other sources of updates include current household surveys, special censuses, and local sources.

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26. What types of maps are available for the LUCA program?

Census Bureau maps are provided to give you a reference for locating and geocoding individual addresses, and to update or make corrections to your jurisdiction's features and boundaries. Maps are available in paper or shapefile format.

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27. What is the Map Sheet-to-Block Number Relationship List?

The Map Sheet-to-Block Number Relationship List identifies census block numbers and the Census Bureau paper map(s) on which each block is located.

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28. What are shapefiles?

Shapefiles are digital representations of geographic features, such as roads and boundaries, that are used to create maps. A shapefile stores non-topological geometry and attribute information for the spatial features in a data set. The Census Bureau provides county-based shapefile layers in Environmental Systems Research Institute* (ESRI) shapefile format.

* The use of brand names does not represent an endorsement of a company or its products by the U.S. government. Due to the wide use of ESRI products by our partners in the GIS community, and ubiquitous use of the shapefile format as a medium for GIS data exchange, the Census Bureau provides data in shapefile format.

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29. What are the requirements for using the Census Bureau's shapefiles?

In order to submit digital feature information, you must have geographic information system (GIS) software capable of importing ESRI shapefiles, editing the features, and exporting layers back into ESRI shapefile format.

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Confidentiality and Security

30. Why is the Census Bureau's Address List Confidential?

The law requires the U.S. Census Bureau to maintain the confidentiality for all of the information that it collects. The Census Bureau takes its responsibility to protect the confidentiality of the information it collects very seriously. Respondents place their trust in the Census Bureau each time they complete a survey or an interview. This trust in confidentiality is critical to the success of the Census Bureau's mission to collect and report the most accurate data possible. To uphold the law, the Census Bureau requires that all individuals who work with the Census Bureau's confidential materials read, understand, and agree to abide by the confidentiality and security guidelines.

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31. What is Title 13, United States Code (U.S.C.)?

Title 13, United States Code (U.S.C.) provides for the confidential treatment of census-related information, including individual addresses and map structure points that identify the location of housing units and group quarters.

Title 13 requires that all liaisons, reviewers, and anyone with access to Title 13 materials read, understand, and agree to abide by the Confidentiality and Security Guidelines.

Title 13 also requires that the Census Bureau maintain the confidentiality for all of the information that it collects.

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32. What are the Confidentiality and Security Guidelines?

The Confidentiality and Security Guidelines describe how to protect Title 13, U.S.C. Census information. The guidelines discuss the nondisclosure of confidential information, how to secure Title 13 information, and how to return or destroy all Title 13 materials once the LUCA appeals process is complete.

All Option 1 and Option 2 participants must read and understand the Confidentiality and Security Guidelines and are required to sign a Confidentiality Agreement form.

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33. Who is required to sign the Confidentiality Agreement?

All Option 1 and Option 2 liaisons, reviewers, and anyone with access to Title 13 materials must agree to keep confidential the Census Bureau's address information and location of map structure points by signing the Confidentiality Agreement form.

Signatures on the Confidentiality Agreement constitute an agreement by each individual to abide by the Census Bureau's Confidentiality and Security Guidelines.

Prior confidentiality agreements on file with the Census Bureau will not fulfill the requirement of the 2010 Decennial Census LUCA program. Each liaison, reviewer, and anyone with access to Title 13 materials must sign a new agreement for this program.

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34. What is the penalty for violating Title 13, U.S.C.?

The penalty for violating Title 13, U.S.C. is a fine of up to $250,000 and/or five (5) years imprisonment.

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35. Can we use the Census Bureau Address List for any purpose other than LUCA?

No, you can only use the Census Bureau Address List for the LUCA program.

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36. What is a LUCA liaison?

Each participating government must designate a LUCA liaison who accepts the responsibility for protecting and safeguarding Title 13 materials.

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37. What is the Self-Assessment Checklist?

The Self-Assessment Checklist is designed to measure your ability to meet the Census Bureau's security requirements. If you cannot meet the requirements listed in the checklist, you are not eligible for Option 1 or Option 2 participation.

The LUCA liaisons for Option 1 and Option 2 must complete and return the form.

The Census Bureau reviews the checklists. If any confidentiality problems are evident, the Census Bureau will contact you and attempt to work out a satisfactory resolution to the problem.

The Census Bureau will not ship Title 13 materials to you until the signed form is received and the evidence of adequate security measures exists.

If you are unable to provide positive responses to all questions, you should select Option 3.

If you are unable to provide positive responses to the questions about computer security and you select Option 1, you may request a paper format address list if your entity has 6000 addresses or fewer and you are able to secure the paper address list.

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Participation Options

38. What are the LUCA participation options?

The 2010 Decennial Census LUCA Program offers three participation options:

Option 1. Title 13 Full Address List Review

Participants who select Option 1 are required to sign a Confidentiality Agreement form

Option 2. Title 13 Local Address List Submission

Participants who select Option 2 are required to sign a Confidentiality Agreement form

Option 3. Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission

Participants who select Option 3 are not required to sign a Confidentiality Agreement form.

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39. What does Option 1 - Title 13 Full Address List Review allow participants to do?

Option 1 allows participants to:

  • Review the Census Bureau™ Address List for your jurisdiction including city-style and noncity-style residential addresses.
  • Comment on any single or multiunit structure or group quarters city-style address in a census block on the Address List using correct, delete, not in jurisdiction, or nonresidential action codes.
  • Add single, multiunit structure, or group quarters city-style addresses only not found on the Address List to the Address List Add Page.
  • Challenge the count of addresses for a census block on the Address Count List.
  • Identify any additions, deletions, or corrections to the location and/or name of roads or other physical features and/or boundaries on the Census Bureau paper maps or submit an updated version of the digital map file (shapefile) provided by the Census Bureau.
  • Review the feedback materials that the Census Bureau returns to the participant, based on its Address Canvassing operation (a field check conducted by the Bureau to verify all addresses).
  • Appeal the results of the Address Canvassing operation.

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40. What does Option 1 - Title 13 Full Address List Review not allow participants to do?

Under Option 1, participants cannot update any noncity-style address on the Census Bureau's Address List.

You cannot both challenge the count of addresses in a census block and add/delete/correct individual addresses within that census block.

Even if the Census Bureau Address List has only noncity-style addresses for a block, you can and should add any city-style addresses that currently exist for that block.

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41. What materials are provided to Option 1 participants?

The materials the Census Bureau provides to Option 1 participants include the:

  • Census Bureau™ Address List containing all of the residential addresses, both housing unit and group quarters addresses, known to the Census Bureau for your jurisdiction.
    • If your jurisdiction contains 6000 or more addresses, you cannot receive a paper Address List; your Address List will be provided in computer-readable format.
    • If your jurisdiction contains less than 6000 addresses, you may request either a paper or computer-readable Address List.
  • Address Count List (paper or computer-readable format).
  • Address List Add Page (paper format).
  • Census Bureau map either in paper format or digital shapefiles.
  • Map Sheet to Block Number Relationship List (paper map format.
  • The 2010 Census LUCA User Guide.
  • After Address Canvassing, you will receive feedback materials of the Census Bureau™ findings including an updated Address List, Address Count List, maps, and a detailed feedback list that describes what we did with each address update you submitted based on the results of Address Canvassing.

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42. What does Option 2 - Title 13 Local Address List Submission allow participants to do?

Option 2 allows participants to:

  • Review the Census Bureau™ Address List for your jurisdiction including city-style and noncity-style residential addresses and the
  • Address Count List for your jurisdiction. These lists are for reference purposes only.
  • Submit your local address list file of single or multiunit structure or group quarters city-style addresses lonely, in a predefined Census Bureau computer-readable format.
  • Identify any additions, deletions, or corrections to the location and/or name of roads or other physical features and/or boundaries on the Census Bureau paper maps or submit an updated version of the digital map file (shapefile) provided by the Census Bureau.
  • Review the feedback materials that the Census Bureau returns to the participant, based on its Address Canvassing operation (a field check conducted by the Bureau to verify all addresses).
  • Appeal the results of the Address Canvassing operation.

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43. What does Option 2 - Title 13 Local Address List Submission not allow participants to do?

Under Option 2, participants cannot comment on the Census Bureau's Address List or challenge the count of addresses for census blocks within their jurisdiction. These lists are provided for reference purposes only.

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44. What materials are provided to Option 2 participants?

The materials the Census Bureau provides to Option 2 participants include the:

  • The Address List and Address Count List, for reference only. These are available in computer-readable format only on a CD-ROM.
  • A Census Bureau map provided in paper format or shapefiles for use with a GIS.
  • Map Sheet to Block Number Relationship List (paper map format).
  • The 2010 Census LUCA User Guide.
  • After address canvassing, you will receive feedback materials of the Census Bureau™ findings including an updated Address List, Address Count List, maps, and a detailed feedback list that describes what we did with each address you submitted based on the results of Address Canvassing.

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45. What does Option 3 - Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission allow participants to do?

Option 3 allows you to:

  • Review the count of addresses for each census block within your jurisdiction.
  • Submit your local address list (city-style addresses only) in a Census Bureau predefined computer-readable format.

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46. What does Option 3 - Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission not allow participants to do?

Under Option 3, participants cannot challenge the count of addresses for census blocks on the Address Count List.

In addition, you cannot appeal the results of the count of addresses by census block since you will not know which addresses are missing from the Census Bureau's Address List.

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47. What materials are provided to Option 3 participants?

The materials provided to Option 3 participants include:

  • Address Count List for reference purposes only is provided on CD-ROM.
  • A Census Bureau map provided in paper format or shapefiles for use with a GIS.
  • Map Sheet to Block Number Relationship List (paper map format).
  • The 2010 Census LUCA User Guide.
  • After address canvassing, you will receive feedback materials of the Census Bureau's findings which include an updated Address Count List and maps.

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48. In what formats are the LUCA materials available?

Depending on your participation option, the Census Bureau provides LUCA materials in the following formats:

  • Option 1. Title 13 Full Address List Review materials are available in paper or computer-readable format. If you choose the computer-readable format, you may also elect to use the MTPS.
  • Option 2. Title 13 Local Address List Submission is available in computer-readable format. If you choose the computer-readable format, you may also elect to use the MTPS.
  • Option 3. Non-Title 13 Local Address List Submission is available in computer-readable format. If you choose the computer-readable format, you may also elect to use the MTPS.
  • Maps for all options are available in paper or digital shapefiles.

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LUCA Program Responsibilities

49. What are the responsibilities of each option for participating in the LUCA program?

The responsibilities of Option 1 and Option 2 participants include:

  • Selecting your LUCA liaison and reviewers.
  • Signing and returning the Registration Form.
  • Reading, understanding, and agreeing to abide by the Census Bureau™ Confidentiality and Security Guidelines.
  • Signing and returning to the Census Bureau the Confidentiality Agreement Form.
  • Completing and returning the Self-Assessment Checklist.
  • Completing and returning the Participation Option/Product Preference Form.
  • Understanding the procedures for participating in the LUCA program as well as Census Bureau terminology and concepts.
  • Securing all Title 13, U.S.C. materials.
  • Within 120 calendar days of receiving your LUCA materials, completing your address list review and returning your updated materials. November 19, 2007 is the last day to register with a guarantee of 120 calendar days to complete your review.
  • Reviewing feedback materials.
  • Appealing feedback discrepancies to an independent LUCA Appeals Office within 30 calendar days of receiving your feedback materials.
  • At the conclusion of the appeals process, returning to the Census Bureau or destroying all Title 13 materials.
  • Verifying the return or destruction of Title 13 materials by signing and returning to the Census Bureau the Return or Destruction of Title 13, U.S.C. Materials form.
    • The LUCA liaison, reviewers and anyone with access to Title 13 materials are required to sign this form at the conclusion of the appeals process.

The responsibilities of Option 3 participants include:

  • Selecting your LUCA liaison and reviewers.
  • Signing and returning the Registration Form.
  • Completing and returning the Participation Option/Product Preference Form.
  • Understanding the procedures for participating in the LUCA program, as well as Census Bureau terminology and concepts.
  • Completing the LUCA review and submiting your local address list and updated maps within 120 calendar days from the receipt of your LUCA materials. November 19, 2007 is the last day to register with a guarantee of 120 calendar days to complete your review.
  • Reviewing feedback materials.

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50. What are the Census Bureau's responsibilities?

The Census Bureau's LUCA program responsibilities include:

  • Providing training to LUCA Program participants.
  • Providing the necessary materials to participants.
  • Providing technical assistance.
  • Processing updates submitted by LUCA participants.
  • Conducting a 100% Address Canvassing (field check) operation. The Census Bureau will visit each census block within your jurisdiction during this operation to update our address list and validate your LUCA submissions.
  • Providing feedback materials for your review.
  • Providing assistance to participants to resolve any discrepancies.
  • Providing for a formal appeal process, by an independent federal agency outside of the Census Bureau and Department of Commerce.

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Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Geography | (301) 763-1128 |  Last Revised: July 19, 2013