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You are here: Census.govPeople and HouseholdsHousing Vacancies and Homeownership (CPS/HVS) MainData › › Fourth Quarter 1999

Fourth Quarter 1999

UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF                     
COMMERCE 
NEWS

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20230


Robert R. Callis For Release 10:00 AM EDT, January 27, 2000 Linda B. Cavanaugh CB00-09 (301) 763-3199

CENSUS BUREAU REPORTS ON RESIDENTIAL VACANCIES AND HOMEOWNERSHIP

     National vacancy rates in the fourth quarter 1999 were 7.9 percent in
rental housing and 1.6 percent in homeowner housing, the Department of
Commerce's Census Bureau announced today.  The Census Bureau said that
neither the rental vacancy rate nor the homeowner vacancy rate was
significantly different from its corresponding rate in the fourth
quarter of 1998 or from the rate last quarter.

Table 1. Rental and Homeowner Vacancy Rates for the United States: 1982 to 1999 (in percent)

Rental vacancy rate

Homeowner vacancy rate


Year

First
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Fourth
Quarter
First
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Fourth
Quarter
1999.....
1998.....
1997.....
1996.....
1995.....
1994.....
1993r....
1993.....
1992.....
1991.....
1990.....
1989r....
1989.....
1988.....
1987.....
1986.....
1985.....
1984.....
1983.....
1982.....
8.2
7.7
7.5
7.9
7.4
7.5
7.8
7.9
7.4
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.3
8.0
7.4
6.9
6.3
5.6
5.7
5.3
8.1
8.0
7.9
7.8
7.7
7.4
7.6
7.6
7.7
7.3
7.0
7.4
7.3
7.7
7.5
7.3
6.2
5.5
5.5
5.1
8.2
8.2
7.9
8.0
7.7
7.2
7.0
7.1
7.3
7.6
7.2
7.6
7.3
7.8
8.1
7.5
6.8
6.0
5.8
5.3
7.9
7.8
7.7
7.7
7.7
7.4
6.9
6.9
7.1
7.3
7.2
7.1
6.8
7.3
7.8
7.7
6.7
6.3
5.5
5.5
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.5
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.5
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.4
1.6
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.6
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.6
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.6
1.7
1.7
1.9
1.7
1.5
1.6
1.6
1.7
1.5
1.7
1.5
1.4
1.4
1.4
1.6
1.8
1.7
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.7
1.6
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.6
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.6
1.4
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.7
1.6
1.6
rRevised.

     For rental housing, the vacancy rates were highest outside
Metropolitan Areas (MAs), 9.6 percent and lowest in the suburbs, 7.1
percent.  The rental vacancy rates in all areas were not significantly
different from their respective fourth quarter 1998 rates.

     The homeowner vacancy rate in central cities, 1.8 percent, was lower
than the rate for the fourth quarter of 1998, while rates in the suburbs
and outside MAs did not change significantly.

     Among regions, the rental vacancy rate was highest in the South,
10.2 percent, and lowest in the Northeast 5.3 percent.  None of the
rental vacancy rates for the regions changed significantly from those
reported in the fourth quarter of 1998.

     The homeowner vacancy rate for the Midwest, 1.0 percent was
significantly lower than the other regions and was also lower than
the corresponding rate for the fourth quarter of 1998.  The other
regions did not change significantly from their respective rates
last year.

Table 2. Rental and Homeowner Vacancy Rates By Area:
Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1998
(in percent)

Rental vacancy rates Homeowner vacancy rates
Area Fourth
Quarter
1999
Fourth
Quarter
1998
Standard
error on
1999
rate
Standard
error on
differ-
ence
Fourth
Quarter
1999
Fourth
Quarter
1998
Standard
error on
1999
rate
Standard
error on
differ-
ence
United States........

Inside MAs.........

In central cities

Not in central
cities (suburbs)

Outside MAs......

Northeast...........

Midwest.............

South.................

West..................

7.9

7.7

8.2


7.1

9.6

5.3

9.0

10.2

6.1
7.8

7.5

8.0


6.9

9.3

6.1

8.0

9.5

6.6
0.2

0.2

0.3


0.3

0.5

0.4

0.5

0.3

0.3
0.3

0.3

0.4


0.4

0.7

0.5

0.6

0.5

0.5

1.6

1.5

1.8


1.4

2.0

1.5

1.0

2.0

1.8

1.8

1.7

2.3


1.5

1.9

1.3

1.5

2.1

1.8

0.1

0.1

0.1


0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2


0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.2
There were an estimated 118.8 million housing units in the United States in the fourth quarter of 1999. Approximately 105.3 million housing units were occupied, 70.5 million by owners and 34.8 million by renters. The number of owner-occupied units was higher than one year ago, while there was no significant change in renter-occupied units from one year ago. Of the 13.5 million vacant housing units, 10.4 million were for year-round use. Approximately 3.0 million of the year-round vacant units were for-rent, 1.2 million were for-sale-only, and the remaining 6.2 million were vacant for a variety of reasons.

Table 3. Estimates of the Total Housing Inventory for the United States:
Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1998

(Numbers in Thousands)

Type Fourth
Quarter
1999
Fourth
Quarter
1998
Standard
error on
1999
Estimate
Standard
error on
difference
Percent of
total
(1999)
All housing units............


Occupied......................
Owner........................
Renter........................

Vacant..........................
Year-round.................
For rent...................
For sale only............
Other.......................

Seasonal.....................

118,827


105,286
70,455
34,831

13,541
10,428
3,046
1,181
6,201

3,113
117,589


104,035
69,097
34,938

13,554
10,514
2,978
1,242
6,294

3,040
234


244
243
197

132
117
64
40
91

65
332


346
343
279

186
165
91
58
129

92
100


89
59
29

11
9
3
1
5

3

During the fourth quarter of 1999, the homeownership rate was 66.9 percent. The homeownership rate was higher than the rate for the fourth quarter of 1998, but was not significantly different than the rate last quarter.

Table 4. Homeownership Rates for the United States: 1980 to 1999
(in percent)

Year Homeownership Rates1
First
Quarter

Third
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Fourth
Quarter
1999..........................................

1998..........................................

1997..........................................

1996..........................................

1995..........................................

1994..........................................

1993r.........................................

1993..........................................

1992..........................................

1991..........................................

1990..........................................

1989r.........................................

1989.........................................

1988.........................................

1987.........................................

1986.........................................

1985.........................................

1984.........................................

1983.........................................

1982.........................................

1981.........................................

1980.........................................

66.7

65.9

65.4

65.1

64.2

63.8

63.7

64.2

64.0

63.9

64.0

63.9

63.9

63.7

63.8

63.6

64.1

64.6

64.7

64.8

65.6

65.5

66.6

66.0

65.7

65.4

64.7

63.8

63.9

64.4

63.9

63.9

63.7

63.8

63.9

63.7

63.8

63.8

64.1

64.6

64.7

64.9

65.3

65.5

67.0

66.8

66.0

65.6

65.0

64.1

64.2

64.7

64.3

64.2

64.0

64.1

64.0

64.0

64.2

63.8

63.9

64.6

64.8

64.9

65.6

65.8

66.9

66.4

65.7

65.4

65.1

64.2

64.2

64.6

64.4

64.2

64.1

63.8

63.8

63.8

64.1

63.9

63.5

64.1

64.4

64.5

65.2

65.5

1Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates for the United States generally are 0.2 percent.

Table 4SA shows the seasonally adjusted homeownership rates for the United States from 1980 to the present. (Research has shown that seasonality for homeownership rates is present.) The seasonally adjusted fourth quarter homeownership rate, 67.0 percent, was higher than the rate for the fourth quarter of 1998, but not significantly different from the rate last quarter.

Table 4SA. Homeownership Rates for the United States: 1980 to 1999
Seasonally Adjusted (in percent)

Year Homeownership Rates2 (Seasonally Adjusted)
First
Quarter

Third
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Fourth
Quarter

1999..........................................

1998..........................................



1997..........................................

1996..........................................

1995..........................................

1994..........................................

1993r.........................................



1993..........................................

1992..........................................

1991..........................................

1990..........................................

1989r.........................................



1989.........................................

1988.........................................

1987.........................................

1986.........................................

1985.........................................



1984.........................................

1983.........................................

1982.........................................

1981.........................................

1980.........................................

66.8

66.0



65.5

65.2

64.4

64.0

63.8



(NA)

64.1

64.0

64.1

64.0



(NA)

63.8

63.9

63.7

64.1



64.6

64.7

64.8

65.6

65.5

66.7

66.1



r65.8

65.4

64.8

63.9

64.0



(NA)

64.0

64.1

63.9

63.9



(NA)

63.8

63.9

63.8

64.1



64.6

64.7

64.9

65.4

65.6

66.8

66.6



65.8

65.4

64.8

63.9

64.0



(NA)

64.1

64.0

63.8

63.9



(NA)

63.9

64.1

63.7

63.8



64.5

64.6

64.7

65.4

65.6

67.0

66.5



65.8

65.4

65.1

64.1

64.1



(NA)

64.3

64.1

64.0

63.7



(NA)

63.8

64.1

63.9

63.6



64.2

64.5

64.6

65.3

65.6

2Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates for the United States generally are 0.2 percent.
rRevised.
(NA) Not Applicable. Only the revised series for 1989 and 1993 were used in calculating the seasonality adjustment.

Homeownership rates in the fourth quarter of 1999 were highest in the Midwest at 72.5 percent and lowest in the West at 60.6 percent. Both the Northeast, 63.2 percent, and Midwest, 72.5 percent showed an increase in their respective fourth quarter 1999 rates from those shown one year ago None of the homeownership rates changed significantly from the rates shown in the previous quarter of 1999.

Table 5. Homeownership Rates for the United States and Regions:

1995 to 1999 (in percent)

Homeownership Rates3

Year/Quarter
United
States
Northeast Midwest South West
1999

Fourth Quarter...............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter................

First Quarter.................



1998
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................



66.9

67.0

66.6

66.7




66.4

66.8

66.0

65.9



63.2

63.6

62.8

62.7




62.0

63.4

62.7

62.4



72.5

72.1

71.2

71.2




71.5

71.7

70.3

70.6



69.1

69.3

68.9

69.2




69.0

68.8

68.4

68.2



60.6

60.8

61.3

61.0




60.4

61.1

60.3

60.1

1997
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................

1996
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................

1995
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................


65.7

66.0

65.7

65.4


65.4

65.6

65.4

65.1


65.1

65.0

64.7

64.2


62.7

63.0

62.4

61.6


62.3

62.8

62.3

61.4


61.6

62.2

62.3

61.9


70.4

70.7

70.3

70.6


70.8

70.7

70.5

70.4


70.1

70.1

68.5

67.9


67.8

68.2

68.1

67.8


67.6

67.5

67.2

67.5


67.5

66.6

66.5

66.1


59.8

59.8

59.9

59.0


58.9

59.2

59.8

58.9


59.0

59.1

59.8

58.9

3Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates by region generally are 0.5 percent.

Homeownership rates by age of householder ranged from 40.3 percent for householders less than 35 years old to 81.3 percent for householders 55 to 64 years old in the fourth quarter of 1999. None of the rates for the various age groups was significantly different from those reported during the fourth quarter of 1998.

Table 6. Homeownership Rates by Age of Householder: 1995 to 1999
(in percent)

Year/Quarter Homeownership Rates4
United
States
Less than
35 years
35 to 44
years
45 to 54
years
55 to 64
years
65 years
and over

1999
Fourth Quarter.......

Third Quarter........

Second Quarter........

First Quarter.........



1998
Fourth Quarter......

Third Quarter........

Second Quarter.....

First Quarter.........



66.9

67.0

66.6

66.7




66.4

66.8

66.0

65.9



40.3

40.1

39.1

39.4




39.6

39.5

39.3

39.0



67.9

67.4

66.5

67.0




67.6

67.8

66.2

65.9



75.2

76.3

76.4

76.2




74.9

76.3

75.5

75.9



81.3

80.7

80.8

81.1




81.7

81.1

80.4

80.3



79.6

80.8

80.4

79.8




79.2

79.7

79.2

79.1

1997
Fourth Quarter......

Third Quarter........

Second Quarter.....

First Quarter.........

1996
Fourth Quarter......

Third Quarter........

Second Quarter.....

First Quarter.........

1995
Fourth Quarter......

Third Quarter........

Second Quarter.....

First Quarter.........


65.7

66.0

65.7

65.4


65.4

65.6

65.4

65.1


65.1

65.0

64.7

64.2


38.7

38.9

38.6

38.6


39.1

39.0

39.3

38.8


39.1

39.1

38.7

37.7


65.9

66.5

66.3

65.5


65.5

66.3

65.5

64.6


65.5

65.4

65.1

64.9


75.7

76.3

75.6

75.5


75.6

75.9

75.5

75.5


75.2

75.4

75.2

74.9


80.3

80.1

80.3

79.6


80.1

79.7

80.0

80.2


79.5

79.3

79.9

79.4


79.1

79.2

79.1

79.2


79.2

78.6

78.9

79.1


78.7

78.1

78.1

77.5

4Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates by age of householder generally are 0.4 percent.

The homeownership rates by race and ethnicity of householder ranged from 45.5 percent for Hispanic householders to 73.3 percent for White non-Hispanic householders. The rates for both White and White non-Hispanic householders were higher than the respective rates for the fourth quarter of 1998.

Table 7. Homeownership Rates by Race and Ethnicity of Householder: 1995 to 1999

(in percent)

Year/Quarter
Homeownership Rates5

U.S. Total

White,
total

White,
non-
Hispanic
Black,
total

Other
Race,
total

Hispanic6,
total
1999
Fourth Quarter.........

Third Quarter..........

Second Quarter.........

First Quarter..........

1998
Fourth Quarter.......

Third Quarter.........

Second Quarter......

First Quarter..........

1997
Fourth Quarter.......

Third Quarter.........

Second Quarter......

First Quarter..........

1996
Fourth Quarter.......

Third Quarter.........

Second Quarter......

First Quarter..........

1995
Fourth Quarter.......

Third Quarter.........

Second Quarter......

First Quarter..........


66.9

67.0

66.6

66.7


66.4

66.8

66.0

65.9


65.7

66.0

65.7

65.4


65.4

65.6

65.4

65.1


65.1

65.0

64.7

64.2


70.5

70.7

70.4

70.3


70.1

70.4

69.7

69.6


69.3

69.5

69.4

69.0


69.1

69.2

69.2

68.7


68.8

69.0

68.7

68.2


73.3

73.5

73.2

72.8


72.6

73.1

72.5

72.1


71.9

72.3

72.1

71.6


71.8

71.8

71.7

71.4


71.2

71.1

70.9

70.4


46.8

46.6

45.3

46.3


45.9

46.6

44.7

45.2


45.1

45.3

44.4

44.5


44.4

44.5

43.7

43.8


44.3

43.0

42.2

41.2


54.3

54.5

53.2

52.8


52.7

53.6

53.5

52.3


52.5

53.1

52.7

51.8


51.4

51.5

50.0

50.9


48.4

46.5

46.7

47.2


45.5

45.5

44.9

46.2


45.7

44.9

43.9

44.4


44.0

43.0

43.3

42.6


42.3

43.5

43.9

41.4


41.1

42.5

42.8

41.8

5Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates by race and ethnicity of householder generally are 0.2 percent for White and White non-Hispanic householders, 0.5 percent for Black householders, 1.0 percent for Other Race householders, and 0.7 percent for Hispanic householders.

6Hispanics may be of any race.

The homeownership rate for households with incomes less than the median family income in the fourth quarter of 1999 was 51.2 percent, while the rate for households with incomes greater than or equal to the median family income was 81.6 percent. The former rate was statistically unchanged from the corresponding fourth quarter 1998 rate, while the latter was significantly higher.

Table 8. Homeownership Rates by Family Income: 1995 to 1999 (in percent)

Homeownership Rates7

Year/Quarter
United States Households with family income greater than or equal to the median family income8 Households with family income less than the median family income
1999
Fourth Quarter................

Third Quarter.................

Second Quarter................

First Quarter.................

1998
Fourth Quarter.............

Third Quarter...............

Second Quarter............

First Quarter.................


66.9

67.0

66.6

66.7


66.4

66.8

66.0

65.9


81.6

81.7

81.5

81.1


80.7

81.6

80.7

80.7


51.2

51.4

50.8

51.2


51.1

51.1

50.0

50.2

1997
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................

1996
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................

1995
Fourth Quarter..............

Third Quarter................

Second Quarter.............

First Quarter..................


65.7

66.0

65.7

65.4


65.4

65.6

65.4

65.1


65.1

65.0

64.7

64.2


80.5

80.9

80.8

79.7


80.1

80.5

80.3

79.7


79.8

79.6

79.5

79.1


50.0

50.2

50.0

49.9


49.8

49.4

49.2

49.4


49.4

49.0

48.6

48.1

7Standard errors for quarterly homeownership rates by family income generally are 0.3 percent.

8Based on families or primary individuals reporting income.

Note: This press release along with more detailed data are available on the Internet. Our Internet address is: www.census.gov/hhes/www/hvs.html

The estimates in this release are based on a sample survey and therefore are subject to both sampling and non-sampling error. Sampling error is a result of not surveying the entire population. Non-sampling error occurs because accurate information cannot always be obtained. The standard errors provided in the tables are primarily measures of sampling error.

Standard errors are used to: 1) measure the accuracy of the survey estimates, and 2) draw inferences from the survey data. For example, the standard error on the estimated rental vacancy rate of 7.9 percent is 0.2 percentage points. Consequently, the 90-percent confidence interval as shown by these data is from 7.6 to 8.2 percent; i.e., the interval 7.9 + (1.6 x 0.2) percentage points. Thus, one can say with about 90-percent confidence that the average rental vacancy rate derived from all possible samples is included in this confidence interval. Statements about differences are made only when the 90-percent confidence interval on the estimated difference does not include zero.


Go to Housing Vacancies and Homeownership: Fourth Quarter 1999

Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Housing Vacancies and Homeownership (CPS/HVS) |  Last Revised: 2012-09-25T14:34:02.646-04:00