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Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tabulation

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Frequently Asked Questions - EEO 2000 Tabulation

  1. Why does the Census Bureau produce a Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  2. What are the characteristics shown in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  3. What is "worksite geography"?
  4. What is "residence geography"?
  5. What are worksite/residence datasets?
  6. Are county data available as in past EEO tabulations?
  7. Will disclosure rules apply to the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation? If yes, what are the basic rules?
  8. Why do some datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain 472 occupational categories and other datasets contain 471?
  9. Will the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation be available to the public?
  10. Why is the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation coming out in 2003 when the data were collected in 2000?
  11. How much did the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation cost to produce?
  12. Does the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?
  13. Are the educational attainment datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation based on Civilian Labor Force data or population data?
  14. Do the occupations on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation match the Standard Occupational Classification System (SOC)?
  15. How do the industry and occupation classifications for Census 2000 compare to the ones used in the 1990 Census?
  16. Why were the industry codes for Census 2000 changed from the SIC to the NAICS?
  17. Which set of occupation codes would I use to develop my Affirmative Action Program (AAP), Affirmative Employment Plan (AEP), and/or Equal Employment Opportunity Plan (EEOP)?
  18. How does NAICS compare to the SIC?
  19. Why was the SOC revised?
  20. How does the new SOC (1998) compare to the old SOC (1980)?
  21. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I want to order the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation CD-ROM?
  22. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  23. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?
  24. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?
  25. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Labor?
  26. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the Census 2000 Special EEO file?

Why does the Census Bureau produce a Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?  back to top

The Census Bureau produces the Census 2000 Special EEO file for those Federal agencies responsible for monitoring employment practices and enforcing civil rights laws in the workforce, and for all employers so they can measure their compliance to the laws. The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation serves as the primary external benchmark for conducting comparisons between the racial, ethnic, and sex composition of each employer's workforce to its available labor market.


What are the characteristics shown in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?  back to top

The datasets on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will present data on race and ethnicity cross-tabulated by other variables such as detailed occupations, occupational groups, sex, worksite geography, residence geography, education, age, and industry.


What is "worksite geography"?  back to top

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will present data according to where people worked at the time of Census 2000. These datasets will provide the number of people by occupation, sex, and race and ethnicity who work in a given county or place, who live in the same county or place, and who commute from surrounding counties and places.


What is "residence geography"?  back to top

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will also present data according to where people lived at the time of Census 2000, regardless of where they worked


What are worksite/residence datasets?  back to top

The worksite/residence datasets focus on where people work but provide additional information on where people commute from.


Are county data available as in past EEO tabulations?  back to top

In order to protect the confidentiality of Census 2000 respondents, EEO tabulations will not provide data for counties of less than 50,000 population (or 100,000 in some instances) when the datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO file contain very detailed information or a large number of cells. For example, for worksite/residence datasets that contain information for 471 or 268 detailed occupational categories, county data will not be available. However, for worksite/residence datasets with more highly aggregated occupational categories, such as the EEO occupational groups, data will be available for all counties.


Will disclosure rules apply to the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation? If yes, what are the basic rules?  back to top

Yes, disclosure rules will apply since the Census Bureau must avoid disclosing information about individual respondents in the Census. The disclosure rules listed below were approved by the Census Bureau’s Disclosure Review Board (DRB).

  1. All cells in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation are rounded. The rounding schematic is:
    • 0 remains 0
    • 1-7 rounds to 4
    • 8 or greater rounds to nearest multiple of 5 (i.e., 864 rounds to 865, 982 rounds to 980)
      Any number that already ends in 5 or 0 stays as is.
      Any totals or subtotals needed are constructed before rounding. This assures that universes remain the same from dataset to dataset, and it is recognized that cells in a dataset will no longer be additive after rounding.
  2. If geographic codes are shown, they are Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes where there is a choice of using Census codes or FIPS codes.
  3. Thresholds on universe are normally applied to avoid showing data for very small geographic areas or for very small population groups (often 50 unweighted cases for sample data)

Why do some datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain 472 occupational categories and other datasets contain 471?  back to top

The residence-based datasets have 472 occupational categories and the worksite-based and worksite/residence datasets have 471 categories. The difference is because the residence-based datasets contain a Census occupational category for the unemployed with no work experience since 1995 (Census code 992) - people in this category have a place of residence but no worksite.


Will the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation be available to the public?  back to top

Yes, the public has access to selected data via the Internet at www.census.gov/eeo2000 or all data by purchasing a CD-ROM (to order call 301-763-INFO (4636)).


Why is the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation coming out in 2003 when the data were collected in 2000?  back to top

Basic data tabulations from Census 2000 have priority over this special tabulation; long form data were first released in the summer of 2002.


How much did the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation cost to produce?  back to top

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation was created through an interagency agreement between a Federal consortium (consisting of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; the Department of Justice, Civil Rights Section; Department of Labor, Office of Federal Contract Compliance; and the Office of Personnel Management) and the Census Bureau. The overall cost is approximately $1,000,000 which is equally divided among the consortium members.


Does the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?  back to top

The Census 2000 Special EEO file will contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force (CLF). A total for the CLF is created from the sum of (1) the employed, at work during the enumeration week; (2) the employed, not at work during the enumeration week; and (3) the unemployed, including both experienced and new-entrant jobless who were seeking work. The occupational code for the unemployed is code 992.


Are the educational attainment datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation based on Civilian Labor Force data or population data?  back to top

The education, age and earnings datasets are based on labor force data. However, the worksite/residence and worksite datasets do not include the unemployed (Census occupational code 992). The residence datasets do include the unemployed.


Do the occupations on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation match the Standard Occupational Classification System (SOC)?  back to top

The SOC groups occupations according to the nature of the work performed, and relates these occupations to others of a similar nature. There are 23 major groups in the SOC and 821 detailed occupations within those groups. This classification system provides a mechanism for cross-referencing and aggregating occupation-related data collected by social and economic statistical reporting programs. The Census Bureau has adapted the SOC to create the occupation categories used in Census 2000, and shown on the Census 2000 Special EEO file. In some cases the Census categories are groupings of the more detailed SOC categories.


How do the industry and occupation classifications for Census 2000 compare to the ones used in the 1990 Census?  back to top

The Census 2000 industry and occupation classifications are completely revised from the ones used in 1990. They are now based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and the 1998 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) coding structures. The 1990 system was based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification Manual (SIC) and the 1980 Standard Occupational Classification Manual (SOC). To aid data users, crosswalks are available on this website for both the industry and occupation coding systems.


Why were the industry codes for Census 2000 changed from the SIC to the NAICS?  back to top

The North American Industry Classification System was developed as a joint effort by Canada, Mexico, and the United States, in order to have common industry definitions. This enables economists and others to compare the industrial statistics produced in each of the three different nations' labor force. For more information on the NAICS, go to the website http://www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/. The Census Bureau always uses the most recent standard classification to create its own classification for each census. For this reason it has based the Census 2000 classification on the NAICS rather than on the SIC.


Which set of occupation codes would I use to develop my Affirmative Action Program (AAP), Affirmative Employment Plan (AEP), and/or Equal Employment Opportunity Plan (EEOP)?  back to top

The EEO data file is used by many organizations to develop and update their affirmative action plans. Depending on the level of detail that is required, some organizations use the most detailed occupation codes available (the Census codes) while others may use higher-level aggregations of occupation codes (such as the nine EEO-1 job categories). The Census Bureau created the EEO file according to the sponsors' specifications. Users who need assistance in developing plans and conducting analyses should contact the agency requesting the information. Private companies who are working on their AAP and have questions can contact the Office of Federal Contract Compliance at the Department of Labor by emailing OFCCP-Public@dol.gov. State and local governments and organizations required to complete an EEOP can contact the Department of Justice. Federal agencies can contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by calling Federal Sector Programs at 202-663-4518. If you have any questions on the EEO data tool or the data itself, call the Census Bureau at 301-763-3239.


How does NAICS compare to the SIC?  back to top

There are some differences between the 1997 NAICS and the 1987 SIC, but much of the layout is similar. The user is able to obtain data for more than two thirds of all 4-digit SICs from the new 6-digit NAICS. Either the new NAICS industries are subdivisions of the old SIC industries or the industry definitions have not changed. However, there are some very basic differences between the two. The SIC had only 9 divisions, while the NAICS has 20 sectors. Some of the NAICS sectors were created by splitting SIC divisions.

The NAICS includes advanced technologies and new and emerging industries, which the SIC did not. For example, the NAICS has an information sector not included in the SIC. There is a crosswalk that shows the relationship between SIC and NAICS. This crosswalk is available at http://www.census.gov/epcd/ec97brdg/index.html. If you are interested in a crosswalk showing the relationship between 1990 Census Codes, 2000 Census Codes, and the 1997 NAICS, it is available at http://www.census.gov/people/io/files/indcswk2k.pdf [PDF].


Why was the SOC revised?  back to top

The SOC was revised because it had not been updated since 1980. The revision was long overdue because of changes in the labor force and in the way economists view the labor force. Once the revision process was started, the SOC Revision Policy Committee quickly determined that, due to the extent of the changes being proposed, it was necessary to redesign the entire SOC. Go to the following website http://stats.bls.gov/soc/home.htm for more details.


How does the new SOC (1998) compare to the old SOC (1980)?  back to top

The old SOC was made up of 22 divisions organized into a 4-digit hierarchical structure. The new SOC uses a 6-digit structure for its occupational categories, divided into 23 major groups which are sometimes called "job families." The general concept behind "job families" is to put all people who work together into the same group regardless of their skill level. So, for example, in the new SOC doctors, nurses, and health technicians are all in the same group instead of in different groups. Similarly, first-line supervisors are in the same groups as the workers they supervise, and helpers are in the same groups as the workers they help.


Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I want to order the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation CD-ROM?  back to top

Marketing Services Office
Bureau of the Census
webmaster@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-INFO (4636)
Fax: 301-457-3842


Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?  back to top

Statistical Information
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Phone: 301-763-3242
Fax: 301-457-3500


Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?  back to top

Vivian Toler
Employment Litigaion Section
Civil Rights Division
Department of JusticeVivian.B.Toler@usdoj.gov
Phone: 202-514-3835
Fax: 202-514-1105


Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?  back to top

Joseph R. Donovan
Director
Research and Analytic Services, OGC
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20507
Joseph.Donovan@eeoc.gov
Phone: 202-663-4745
Fax: 202-663-4196

OR

Marc J. Rosenblum
Chief Economist
Research and Analytic Services, OGC
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20507
Marc.Rosenblum@eeoc.gov
Phone: 202-663-7110
Fax: 202-663-4196


Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Labor?  back to top

James C. Pierce
Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
Department of Labor
Pierce.James@dol.gov


Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the Census 2000 Special EEO file?  back to top

Mai Weismantle
Chief
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Mai.Anne.Weismantle@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-3239
Fax: 301-457-3500

OR

Katie Earle
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Katharine.M.Earl@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-3239
Fax: 301-457-3500



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Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tabulation |  Last Revised: 2013-03-08T12:44:59.662-05:00