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International Data Base

Glossary

Age structure.
The distribution of a population according to age, usually by 5-year age groups.
Age-specific fertility rate.
The number of births during a year to women in a particular age group, usually per 1,000 women in a 5-year age group at midyear.
Aging.
An increase in the proportion of the population in the older ages. May also be measured as an increase in the median age of the population.
AIDS.
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
ART.
Anti-retroviral therapy.
Births.
The number of live births occurring during a given calendar year.
Birth rate.
The average annual number of births during a year per 1,000 population at midyear. Also known as the crude birth rate.
Coale-Demeny model life tables.
A series of life tables depicting standard (or model) age patterns of mortality and changes in those patterns at different overall levels of mortality. These series were developed for four "regions" (North, East, South, and West) based on the degree to which the patterns reflected data from those regions of Europe. The models were based on data from all continents, but primarily from Europe.
Cohort.
A group of individuals born in the same calendar year or group of years. Also referred to as a birth cohort.
Components of change (of population).
Fertility, mortality, and migration.
Components of change (of population).
Fertility, mortality, and migration.
Count Question Resolution.
The Census Bureau's procedures and protocols for receiving, processing, and responding to challenges regarding officially-released counts.
Crude death rate.
The average annual number of deaths during a year per 1,000 population at midyear.
Deaths.
The number of deaths occurring during a given calendar year.
Death rate.
The average annual number of deaths during a year per 1,000 population at midyear. Also known as the crude death rate.
Dependency ratios.
A population’s dependency ratio, also known as the age dependency ratio and the total dependency ratio, is the combined child population (people under age 15) and elderly population (people ages 65 and above) per 100 people ages 15-64 (people “of labor force age”). The youth dependency ratio is the number of people under age 15 per 100 people ages 15-64. The elderly, or old age, dependency ratio is the number of people 65 and over per 100 people 15-64. Dependency ratios are also referred to as support ratios.
Dependent age groups.
People under age 15 and people 65 years of age or older.
Development category.
The classification of regions into “less developed” and “more developed” according to their general level of economic development. Countries are classified according to the grouping used by the United Nations. See references to these terms in the Glossary for details.
DHS.
Demographic and Health Survey.
Gross reproduction rate per woman.
The average number of daughters that would be born alive to a hypothetical cohort of women if they lived to the end of their reproductive years and if they experienced the some age-specific fertility throughout their lives that women in each age group experience in a given year or period of years.
Growth rate.
The average annual percent change in the population, resulting from a surplus (or deficit) of births over deaths and the balance of migrants entering and leaving a country. The rate may be positive or negative. Also known as population growth rate or average annual rate of growth.
High risk population.
Individuals at greatest risk of developing HIV/AIDS.
HIV.
Human immunodeficiency virus. The virus that causes AIDS.
Infant mortality rate.
The number of deaths of infants under 1 year of age from a cohort of 1,000 live births. Denoted 1q0 or IMR, it is the probability of dying between birth and exact age 1.
Less developed countries.
The “less developed” countries include all of Africa, all of Asia except Japan, the Transcaucasian and Central Asian republics, all of Latin America and the Caribbean, and all of Oceania except Australia and New Zealand. This category matches the “less developed country” classification employed by the United Nations. “Less developed” countries are sometimes referred to as “developing” countries.
Life expectancy at birth.
The average number of years a group of people born in the same year can be expected to live if mortality at each age remains constant in the future.
Life table.
A statistical table that follows a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 people born at the same time as they progress through successive ages, with the cohort reduced from one age to the next according to a set of death rates by age until all people eventually die.
Median age.
The midpoint age that separates the younger half of a population from the older half.
MICS.
Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey.
Midyear population.
The population estimate for July 1 of the given year.
Modern methods of contraception.
Condoms, IUD’s, pills, vaginal methods (spermicides, diaphragms, or caps), injectables, and voluntary sterilization of a woman or her partner.
More developed countries.
The “more developed” countries and areas include all of North America and Europe plus Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. This category matches the “more developed” classification employed by the United Nations.
Natural increase.
The difference between the number of births and the number of deaths.
Net migration rate.
The difference between the number of migrants entering and those leaving a country in a year, per 1,000 midyear population. May also be expressed in percent. A positive figure is known as a net immigration rate and a negative figure as a net emigration rate.
Net number of migrants.
The difference between the number of migrants entering and those leaving a country in a year. A positive figure is known as net immigration and a negative figure as net emigration.
Pandemic.
A global epidemic.
Population pyramid.
A graphical representation of the age and sex distribution of a population. Numbers or proportions of males and females in each age group are plotted as horizontal bars with the males on the left and females on the right. Pyramids may be constructed to show single years of age or, as with the IDB pyramids, 5-year age groups.
Rate of natural increase.
The difference between the crude birth rate and the crude death rate, but usually expressed as a percent rather than per 1,000 population.
RHS.
Reproductive Health Survey.
Sex ratio at birth.
The ratio of male to female births.
Total fertility rate.
The average number of children that would be born per woman if all women lived to the end of their childbearing years and bore children according to a given set of age-specific fertility rates.
Traditional methods of contraception.
Periodic abstinence, rhythm, withdrawal, douche, prolonged breastfeeding, and folk methods. Also known as natural methods.
UNAIDS.
The United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS.
Under-5 mortality.
Number of deaths of children under 5 years of age from a cohort of 1,000 live births. Denoted 5q0, it is the probability of dying between birth and exact age 5.
UNHCR.
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.
UN model life tables.
A series of life tables depicting standard (or model) age patterns of mortality and changes in those patterns at different overall levels of mortality. These series were developed for five patterns: "Latin American," "Chilean," "South Asian," "Far Eastern," and "General" based on data from developing countries.
Vital events.
Births and deaths.
Vital rates.
Birth rates and death rates.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau | International Programs | International Data Base   Revised:December 19, 2013   Version: Data:12.0625 Code:12.0321