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International Data Base

Release Notes: December 2010

The estimates and projections for the United States and Puerto Rico do not incorporate the 2010 Census results released in December 2010. The estimates and projections for the U.S. Island Areas of American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands do not incorporate the 2010 Census results that are scheduled for release in 2012 and 2013. The estimates of land area and density for all these areas also do not reflect the results of the 2010 Census operations.

This release of the IDB contains revised estimates and projections for 18 countries incorporating new data or analysis.  For general information about how these estimates and projections are developed, see Population Estimates and Projections Methodology. All projections have been produced by sex and single years of age up to 100 years and over.

  • Bahrain 
  • Congo (Kinshasa)*
  • Cuba
  • The Gambia*
  • Germany
  • Italy
  • North Korea
  • Kuwait
  • Mayotte
  • Mozambique*
  • Nicaragua
  • Peru
  • Somalia
  • Sri Lanka
  • Tonga
  • Tunisia
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • Uruguay

* Denotes that a country has undergone additional analyses to update the estimated effects of HIV/AIDS.  See Population Estimates and Projections Incorporating AIDS.

Below is a brief summary of revisions for countries experiencing more than a 500,000 change from the previously estimated 2010 population.

  • The population of Congo (Kinshasa) in 2010 is estimated to be 1.1 million (1.5 percent) lower than in the previous update.  This is due primarily to lower estimates of fertility, and to a lesser extent, higher estimates of under-5 mortality, from the late 1990s onward.
  • Germany’s population in 2010 is estimated to be 639 thousand (1 percent) lower than in the previous update due mainly to lower estimates of net international migration, from the mid-2000s onward.
  • Italy’s population in 2010 is estimated to be 2.7 million (5 percent) higher than in the previous update.  This change is due to the combined effects of lower mortality and higher net international migration, from about 2000 onward.
  • The population of North Korea in 2010 is estimated to be 1.6 million (7 percent) higher than in the previous update.  This increase is due largely to assumptions of lower mortality, and to a lesser extent, higher fertility, from the early 1990s onward.
  • Peru’s population in 2010 is estimated to be 959 thousand (3 percent) lower than in the previous update, due primarily to increased levels of assumed net international migration, from the mid-1990s onward.

Release notes history

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Source: U.S. Census Bureau | International Programs | International Data Base   Revised:December 19, 2013   Version: Data:12.0625 Code:12.0321