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R&D 2007 - Draft RFP

June 5, 2001

Potential Offerors:

Enclosed is a "DRAFT" Request for Proposal (RFP) 52-SOBC-1-00002 for the acquisition of Research and Development services to support the U.S. Census Bureau (BOC). In an effort to promote open dialog with industry, the U.S. Census Bureau (BOC) requests that you provide comments, questions and/or recommendations regarding this draft RFP.

The BOC will be conducting a Pre-Solicitation Conference on June 7, 2001, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The conference will be held in the Morris Hansen Auditorium at BOC Headquarters, Federal Office Building #3, 4700 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, MD 20746.

Interested parties are requested to provide all responses to the draft RFP no later than June 21, 2001. Please forward your responses to the following email address: acq.vius@census.gov.

Include your Company name, contact person, address telephone and facsimile number and email address. In order to avoid loss of information due to conversion, all information shall be provided as text in the body of the email message.

We appreciate your participation.

Sincerly,

Donna Souders
Contract Specialist


download Draft RFP


SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICE/COSTS

B.1 SCOPE

The scope of this indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity, fixed price, labor hour contract is to acquire research and development (R&D) services to support the Bureau of the Census (BOC). Other direct costs (ODC's) such as long distance travel, computer time, etc., are acceptable items to be invoiced. ODC's shall be invoiced in accordance with the negotiated prices, terms and/or Not-to-Exceed estimates specified on individual task orders.


B.1.1 CONTRACT MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM DOLLAR AMOUNT FOR LABOR

The minimum value of the resulting contract is $2,500.00 over the life of the contract. The maximum value of the contract(s) is $50,000,000.00. The amount of all orders shall not exceed $50,000,000.00.


B.1.2 ORDERING AUTHORITY

No work shall begin until a task order is signed by the Contracting Officer and received by the Contractor. Task orders sent to the Contractor via facsimile transmission may serve as an official "task order".


B.2 SERVICES AND PRICES - ASSESSMENT, PLANNING AND ANALYSIS

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 *Task Administrator




4 *Senior Marketing Specialist/Researcher




5 Senior Technologist




6 Program Analyst




7 *Senior Cost Analyst




8 *Senior Systems Analyst/Technologist




9 *Principal Senior Systems Engineer




10 Senior Systems Engineer




11 Systems Engineer




12 *Telecommunications Specialist




13 *Management Analyst




* Denotes Key Personnel


B.3 SERVICES AND PRICES - ASSESSMENT, PLANNING AND ANALYSIS

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 *Task Administrator




4 *Senior Marketing Specialist/Researcher




5 Senior Technologist




6 Program Analyst




7 *Senior Cost Analyst




8 *Senior Systems Analyst




9 *Principal Senior Systems Engineer




10 Senior Systems Engineer




11 Systems Engineer




12 *Telecommunications Specialist




13 *Management Analyst




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.4 SERVICES AND PRICES - STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 *Task Administrator




4 *Senior Mathematical Statistician




5 *Senior Statistical Programmer




6 Senior Data Analyst




7 Mathematical Statistician




8 Junior Mathematical Statistician




9 Statistical Programmer




10 Principal Researcher




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.5 SERVICES AND PRICES -STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 *Task Administrator




4 *Senior Mathematical Statistician




5 *Senior Statistical Programmer




6 Senior Data Analyst




7 Mathematical Statistician




8 Junior Mathematical Statistician




9 Statistical Programmer




10 Principal Researcher




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.6 SERVICES AND PRICES - METHODOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Methodologist




5 Methodologist




6 *Sampling Statistician




7 Survey Specialist




8 Graphic Artist




9 Interviewer




10 Media Specialist




11 Technical Writer




12 Labor Economist




13 Instructional Design Specialist




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.7 SERVICES AND PRICES - METHODOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Methodologist




5 Methodologist




6 *Sampling Statistician




7 Survey Specialist




8 Graphic Artist




9 Interviewer




10 Media Specialist




11 Technical Writer




12 Labor Economist




13 Instructional Design Specialist




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.8 SERVICES AND PRICES - TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Computer Scientist




5 *Senior Information Technologist/Computer Specialist




6 Senior Computer Programmer




7 Computer Scientist




8 Technology Specialist




9 Programmer




10 Quality Assurance Specialist




11 Requirements Engineer




12 Human Factor Specialist




13 Graphic Artist




14 Media Specialist




15 Technical Writer




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.9 SERVICES AND PRICES - TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Computer Scientist




5 *Senior Information Technologist/Computer Specialist




6 Senior Computer Programmer




7 Computer Scientist




8 Technology Specialist




9 Programmer




10 Quality Assurance Specialist




11 Requirements Engineer




12 Human Factor Specialist




13 Graphic Artist




14 Media Specialist




15 Technical Writer




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.10 SERVICES AND PRICES - SUB-POPULATION RESEARCH

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Social Scientist




5 *Survey Methodologist




6 Sampling Statistician




7 Survey Specialist




8 Graphic Artist




9 Media Specialist




10 Interviewer




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.11 SERVICES AND PRICES -SUB-POPULATION RESEARCH

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Social Scientist




5 *Survey Methodologist




6 Sampling Statistician




7 Survey Specialist




8 Graphic Artist




9 Media Specialist




10 Interviewer




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.12 SERVICES AND PRICES - DATA ANALYSIS AND DISSEMINATION

Contractor Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Subject Matter Specialist




5 Subject Matter Specialist




6 *Senior Data Analyst




7 Principal Researcher




8 Technical Writer




*Denotes Key Personnel


B.13 SERVICES AND PRICES - DATA ANALYSIS AND DISSEMINATION

Government Site

Skill
No.
Description Price Per Hour
Base
Year
Option
Yr. 1
Option
Yr. 2
Option
Yr. 3
Option
Yr. 4
1 *Project Director




2 *Task Manager




3 Task Administrator




4 *Senior Subject Matter Specialist




5 Subject Matter Specialist




6 *Senior Data Analyst




7 Principal Researcher




8 Technical Writer




*Denotes Key Personnel


SECTION C - DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/WORK STATEMENT


C.1 BACKGROUND

The Census Bureau's longstanding purpose has been to provide the official statistics required for effective governing. The strategic direction we have set is intended to improve the value of our contributions to the American public in general and to our customers who directly depend on our products and services.

Our core business is comprised of the conduct of large-scale surveys and censuses. This includes a full range of activities required to produce data, including survey and instrument design and data collection, processing, analysis and dissemination. To remain preeminent in this field, we must conduct research and statistical analysis constantly to support our capabilities to carry out the tasks for surveys and censuses. We must stay abreast of the latest technological advances through assessment and conduct research on the use of such technology to take advantage of its capabilities. We must be aware of our customers' and respondents' concerns and willingness to participate. We must research methodological and statistical advances that may reduce cost and resources and improve quality, especially in light of the current environment of cost effective government programs.

The contractor(s) will support the Census Bureau in carrying out these research and development tasks in one or more technical areas to support our desire to constantly improve our products and service to customers.


C.2 SCOPE OF WORK

Six major subject areas of advisory and assistance services are required: 1) assessment, planning and analysis; 2) statistical analysis; 3) methodological research; 4) technology services; 5) sub-population research; and 6)data analysis and dissemination. The Contractor(s) shall furnish all management, qualified personnel, facilities, materials, hardware, software, and other contractor support services required to perform the Statement of Work/Specifications in Section C.3 for the one or more technical areas awarded to the Contractor(s).

The possible areas of work for each of the six major technical areas are examples of the type of work that would be sought. Other research areas are possible, but would be similar to one of the applications provided. Such research will be fairly described in the statements of work and specifications set forth in task orders.

The Government may issue a task for production purposes to deploy a successful methodological prototype system as a follow-on task to a research and development task order.

The Contractor(s) shall perform all work described herein as ordered on task orders issued by the Contracting Officer. The Census Bureau shall order services by means of task orders with specifically defined scopes and schedules, as needed. It is impossible to determine the precise types or amounts of services that will be ordered during the contract term. The Census Bureau will not use this contract when it has or intends to use Government in-house resources.


C.3 STATEMENT OF WORK/SPECIFICATIONS

The contractor(s) shall furnish the necessary personnel, material, services, and facilities (except as otherwise specified) to perform the Statement of Work/Specifications as described herein.


C.3.1 ASSESSMENT, PLANNING, AND ANALYSIS

This technical area focuses on the assessment, planning and analysis of Census Bureau programs and the way the Census Bureau conducts business. The Census Bureau, like many other Government agencies, must continually assess the changing workforce, current management and operating procedures; emerging markets and technologies, open systems and standards, and the use of automated systems to its mission. Success of future Census programs depends on effective planning and management; the use of automated data processing (ADP) technology; an enhanced level of services and the reduction of life cycle costs. Taking advantage of these opportunities requires not only appropriate technical skills, but also strong management discipline to ensure that the Bureau's decisions result in the expected payoffs. The Bureau needs to maintain flexibility to take advantage of advances that will occur over time.

Possible areas of work are:

C.3.1.1 Marketing Assistance. Assistance in conducting market research and trend analyses; customer and product development, strategic marketing management, modeling and market information systems and testing and evaluating marketing plans and strategies. Customers and their needs are constantly changing. Who the customer is and what products and services are needed change rapidly just as society as a whole changes. Once a product or service need has been identified, we need to determine the best and most acceptable means of production and distribution. The Census Bureau needs to look at how we identify our customers, what materials and products the customer needs, and the optimal way to produce and distribute the products.

C.3.1.2 Technology Assessment. Assessment, evaluation and integration of rapidly changing technology and emerging automated systems for data collection, data processing and control, data security, data dissemination, migration to open systems, systems design and testing, uses of technology in training, and telecommunications. Assessments provide a means for making reasonable projections about the technologies that are likely to be available in the future along with information on price, performance, standards, training, penetration to various market segments and expertise or training required to use it. The Census Bureau needs to identify these trends early and assess their utility for future program implementations. The Bureau must construct prototype systems to evaluate early enough to meet procurement and logistical timing requirements for program implementation. Examples of technologies the Bureau may be interested in assessing include hand-held computers and palm-tops for field applications of interviewing, listing and mapping; the implementation of multimedia technologies for electronic questionnaires; generalized variance calculation systems; optimal data bases for macro-data and micro-data; web-based/computer-based training and automated calendering/planning tools for field management; the use of the internet/worldwide web for collecting and disseminating data; and for training applications and documentation in a broad array of information.

C.3.1.3 Knowledge, Attitude and Behavioral Studies. Surveys to determine public attitudes and perceptions regarding various technologies; literature reviews; the extent of technology penetration and public's use of technology; cost to users and the economics of the technology(income level of users); relevant legislation under consideration; and research on the ways to migrate to applications software systems that are inter-operable across diverse computing platforms or new platforms that emerge.

C.3.1.4 Project Management Assistance. Assistance with project management and evaluation of computer-based project management tools for the conduct of censuses and surveys to provide leading edge project management solutions for achieving project objectives. A critical success factor in keeping a competitive edge is to define and strengthen project management capabilities across the organization, by evaluating the "as-is" as well as the "to be" status. Failure to meet one or more of the three fundamental project objectives - schedule, budget and product quality - can have a significant impact on the success of the organization as a whole. By researching and developing planning processes at a detailed level, you achieve a critical connection between corporate strategic goals and project goals.

C.3.1.5 Business Case Planning. Assistance with business case planning to develop an integrated set of management tools, policies, and procedures for planning, managing and conducting Census Bureau programs. This support shall include: (1) assisting in the development of a plan of action and set of criteria for determining the scope of benefit/cost analyses; (2) assisting planners in the Bureau's functional areas in the development of business case models related to their functions; (3) supporting the performance of requirements analyses; (4) supporting the performance of benefits/cost analyses that focus on specific solutions suggested as a result of requirements analyses; (5) developing benefit and cost criteria, and guidance for selection of appropriate resources; (6) formulating strategies, plans, procedures, and policies for preparing business case analyses; and (7) Contractor shall run/support/facilitate technical meetings and/or JAD sessions.

C.3.1.6 Technical Analysis. Assistance in conducting technical tradeoff analyses of alternative technology related solutions, to perform the business functions of the program areas. The analysis shall include documentation of the existing functions and processes, high-level alternative solutions that improve the efficiency and/or the effectiveness of the Bureau's business, cost and benefit analysis compatible with the business case model of the functional area, conceptual design documentation of the selected alternative; requirements specification for follow-on efforts to implement the selected alternative, and justification documentation (benefit cost analyses, alternatives analyses, strategic documents, etc.) as appropriate. Technical alternatives to be considered may cover a broad spectrum, including the following areas: (1) artificial intelligence and expert systems; (2) high performance computing platforms; (3) high performance data communications networks; (4) software tools and application packages; and (5) end-user and local group assets. Potential avenues for exploration include ADP hardware, software, data communications, personnel, documentation, global position system(GPS)integration, facilities, and training.

C.3.1.7 Cost and Workload Modeling Assistance. Assistance in supporting predictive and evaluative modeling of cost effective approaches for workloads and assignments using demographic, economic and geographic data. Models based on the integration of the three data groups are necessary to improve planning and cost and workload estimates. The models support evaluations that are based on functions such as quality, coverage and extent of geographic source information and the impact they have on future operations. For example, a model may indicate a measurable relationship between the frequency of feature updates such as new construction or changes to the landscape and their impact on acquisition of additional or modified address information respectively.


C.3.2 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS RESEARCH

This technical area focuses on research and development of statistical theory and methodologies for the design and production of estimates for censuses and surveys. Broad research areas include statistical standards, survey design and estimation, evaluation and quality assurance, small area estimation, confidentiality, sampling and non-sampling errors, automation, data analysis, time series analysis and statistical computing.

Possible areas of work are:

C.3.2.1 Sample Design and Estimation. Sample design and estimation research for the launching/re-design/continuous improvement of a census or survey. The Census Bureau needs flexible sample designs and estimation methodologies that allows for the production of estimates at many different levels, for many different sub-population groups, for many different purposes and for changing sample sizes. Examples of potential research are planning and designing surveys of electronic network usage and of "new economy" business practices; the investigation of methods to maximize the overlap between old and new primary sampling units in multistage sample designs to reduce survey costs or alternatively to minimize the overlap of sampling units in single-stage sample designs; and research on the impact of improved spatial databases using geographic information systems technology on: field assignment criteria; delineation of field assignment areas; new approaches to collection and tabulation geography; census and survey issues for user-defined geography; differencing issues in geo-spatial data; and issues of geographic and statistical data confidentiality.

C.3.2.2 Missing Data Techniques. Research on methods to handle missing and inconsistent data. These may be caused by non-response, respondent errors, interviewer errors, or processing errors. One area where research is needed is developing criteria for choosing between re-weighting and imputation approaches. Another area for research is the development of new statistical methods for computerized imputing and editing algorithms. Research on alternative methods for imputing missing data for racial and ethnic groups and populations requiring special enumeration methodologies is needed. For example, research is needed to assess the impact of using estimation techniques that use data reported by nearby neighbors to impute missing data on persons of Hispanic-origin.

C.3.2.3 Total Error Models. Research to develop and evaluate new error models. Total error models are used to reflect the sources of both sampling and nonsampling error on statistics based on data from censuses and surveys. Such models are also critical in comparing alternative census or survey designs in the context of minimizing total mean square error.

C.3.2.4 Coverage Measurement. Research on methods for refining, improving or developing new techniques for measuring completeness and coverage in our censuses and surveys.

C.3.2.5 Disclosure Avoidance. Research to seek new methods and technologies for maintaining confidentiality in microdata and tables. Research is needed on methods to protect the confidentiality of enumerated persons while at the same time minimizing data distortion or error.

C.3.2.6 Experiments and Simulation Studies. Research on statistical models to reflect the various design options in a simulated census or survey experiment to identify the resources and the timing each option would require. Operations research and linear programming techniques may be applied to study the feasibility of alternative operational configurations for the redesign of censuses and surveys.

C.3.2.7 Administrative Records Research. Research on using data from administrative records to determine the extent to which administrative records could replace or supplement traditional data collection methods in censuses and surveys. This requires research on the quality and completeness of the records, completeness of coverage of the files(e.g. percentage of the total population represented), on the feasibility and effectiveness of different procedures for aggregating administrative records for individuals into households, and on record matching. Research is needed to determine what information is necessary to link records from various sources. Alternative estimation strategies for combining data from different sources, including different record sources as well as enumeration, need to be explored.

C.3.2.8 Statistical Computing. Research the use of statistical methods in generalized survey-processing to improve statistical process control, reduce processing error, reduce software maintenance costs and reduce start-up costs for new surveys. Following initial development of such methodology, continuing research and development is needed to prevent software obsolescence. An example of such research and development is incorporating calibration estimation into an existing generalized survey-processing system.

C.3.2.9 Other Statistical Fields. There are a number of other statistical fields for which expertise may be needed including: experimental design, regression analysis, nonparametric measures, statistical modeling, survey methodology, variance estimation for complex estimators, quality assurance, stochastic process, statistical graphics, survival analysis and latent class analysis, statistical standards, evaluations, small area estimation and time series analysis.


C.3.3 METHODOLOGICAL RESEARCH

This technical area focuses on survey methodology such as questionnaire design, public cooperation and participation, and improvement of enumeration methods and procedures for surveys of individuals, households and establishments. Survey methodology draws on theories and practices developed in several academic disciplines -- mathematics, statistics, psychology, sociology, computer science, and economics. The work includes both observational and experimental methods to test key hypotheses about the nature of human behavior that affect the quality of survey data and modeling of behavior that describe errors in responding to survey questions. Both the social science and statistical concepts are used to study coverage properties, alternative modes of data collection, field administration operations, the role of the survey interviewer, the effect of question structure, wording and context on respondent behavior, models of measurement error and post-survey processing.

Possible areas of work are:

C.3.3.1 Questionnaire Design. Questionnaire research focused on the content, wording and design to reduce measurement error, reduce item nonresponse, reduce respondent burden, and increase participation. Research is also needed to assess if the use of different data collection techniques have any impact on the respondent's understanding and ability to answer questions. Research techniques include pretesting through usability testing, focus groups, cognitive interviews, expert panel review, etc.

C.3.3.2 Response Burden Studies. Respondent burden research to identify ways to reduce individual and business reporting burden by coordinating data requests Bureau-wide and relating information requests with individual and business record keeping practices.

C.3.3.3 Cooperation and Participation. Cooperation and participation research is needed to investigate a variety of issues related to the timing, targeting, content of messages, and the effectiveness of alternative vehicles (oral, visual) for promoting participation in Census Bureau programs. Various segments of the population differ in their attitudes and knowledge about census programs, and vary in their concern about privacy issues. Different media and/or messages may be needed to encourage cooperation in different segments of the populations. Research needs to be conducted on how to inform the American public and traditionally low response groups, in a way that will motivate their participation. Additionally, effective means of communicating complex and potentially controversial messages, such as the use of administrative records or the use of sampling, must be developed and tested.

C.3.3.4 Privacy Issues. Privacy concerns may have significant (and possibly growing) impact on public cooperation with Census Bureau censuses and surveys. Privacy concerns may affect each program differently, depending on census or survey content and other features of the design. For instance, the use of administrative records can supplement Census Bureau data files, and potentially may reduce the burden on respondents; however, the public's attitude towards such use is uncertain. If public reaction is negative, response rates may decline. Research topics include measuring the public's attitudes toward administrative records use, computer matching, data sharing, and development of a notification on administrative records use, stakeholder outreach and education, media tracking, and measuring changes in public attitudes on privacy.

C.3.3.5 Data Collection Techniques. Research on field data collection and interviewing methods to identify and validate the most effective and efficient field data collection practices. This research would include: the examination of the effectiveness of current field training and the potential use of advances in training technology and media; methods for recruitment; testing and selection of field staff; establishing pay rates for field staff; organizational design and management; and performance assessment. Topics covered under this research might include the impact of automation on data collection procedures, methods and training; effective methods for staffing and collecting data in a multilingual/multiethnic/multiracial environment; and methods for building field data collection partnerships with organizations that represent and serve different ethnic, racial and language groups.

Tasks in this area may involve the following types of work: focus groups, in-depth cognitive interviewing, questionnaire pre-testing, field experiments with multiple forms of the questionnaire or variant administrative records notifications, an on-going national survey to provide trend measures of the public's attitudes on privacy, evaluation of data collection methodologies, data analysis, and cost/benefit models to determine evaluation of various design options, sample design and selection, sampling error calculation, interviewer variance, nonresponse bias, undercoverage bias.

C.3.3.6 Technology Use. Research of new electronic data collection and processing technologies and whether proposed changes to a particular survey or census should be undertaken. The various modes of data collection need to be evaluated with respect to applicability, quality and response issues, as well as their potential for reducing respondent burden. For the decennial census, alternative modes and methods of data collection vary in their effectiveness for collecting data from different segments of the population. For business respondents, research is needed to identify the best ways to increase electronic reporting, for example by integrating census and survey questionnaires with widely used accounting software and record keeping practices. Research is needed to evaluate and insure consistency across alternate data collection methods.

C.3.3.7 Human Factors and Usability Research. As computer use permeates almost every aspect of our current and future work, education and home environments, system design and evaluation research is needed to ensure compatibility with human information processing capabilities. This includes conducting task analyses, developing and applying interaction standards and display and function design solutions to computer and information products used the collection, analysis and dissemination phases of census and survey data. Current application areas reflecting an explosion in requests for assistance include: American FactFinder Usability Testing, Internet questionnaires, on-line recruiting and hiring, and computerized self-administered questionnaires.


C.3.4 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

This technical areas focuses on research and development in the rapidly changing computer technology field that can yield dramatic increases in performance and decreases in cost. In the span of a few years, easily affordable computers now have the capabilities of a supercomputer. Although the general trend is easily discernable, specific details of hardware or software characteristics are difficult to predict. Tasking under this activity would include general research, usability and behavioral studies, product evaluation, specifications development, training, programming, evaluation, and testing.

Possible areas of work include:

C.3.4.1 MAF/TIGER Enhancements. Research to improve address and mapping technologies. Study existing Master Address File(MAF) and Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Reference System(TIGER) legacy software systems and proposed Commercial Off the Shelf(COTS) software functions to model and appropriate hardware architecture and a functional software methodology. TIGER is a digital spatial database that contains features and geographic areas and their identifiers that are used as an integrating factor for Census Bureau programs. Maintaining and improving the content and its quality is an on-going goal and a technology challenge. Processes are required to automatically identify, compare, and evaluate spatial and attribute change between TIGER and potential sources.

C.3.4.2 Data Collection and Capture. Research on data collection technologies and data capture technologies. Possible research is the use of CARI (Computer Assisted Recorded Interviews); the use of interactive voice response(IVR), the use of AudioCASI which requires detailed knowledge of MS-Windows internals and DOS to be able to integrate the audio software with the calling program; the use of hand-held devices for data collection; and the use of Web-based surveys and censuses. Exploration may be needed into the use of multi-modes of data collection and allowing respondents to chose their preferred mode. Research on data capture includes the use of imaging technology; and automated capture tools such as Optical Character Recognition(OCR) and Optical Mark Recognition. Research would include the integration of coding into the data capture process and how to improve the reliability of OCR confidence scores.

C.3.4.3 Data Tabulation and Processing. Analysis of the capabilities of high performance computers for tabulating, coding, analyzing, and producing data in a variety of formats and forms. Census Bureau data products are tables for the most part, that are statistical summaries of the underlying detail files. A high speed tabulation system, in conjunction with an automated coding and an automated system for specifying and reviewing tables, could decrease the time needed to produce the data products which would result in more timely, useful data. Also need to evaluate systems for performing automated coding in a variety of configurations (batch, computer-assisted), for a variety of taxonomies (geographic, economic, or industrial classifications), and with measurable levels of accuracy and productivity.

C.3.4.4 Systems Design and Integration. Systems design research is needed to enhance and manage large complex databases encompassing hardware, software, communication, training, conversion/migration and deployment. This work includes requirement studies, system analysis, and development of prototypes for integrating all required components, facilities, equipment and systems and software. Assessment of commercial products and "middleware" methodology to incorporate more of the commercial off-the-shelf(COTS) technologies into integrated survey processing. Investigate proof-of-concept systems by combining multiple COTS products.

C.3.4.5. Software Enhancements. Development and testing of new and enhanced software and applications. Possible applications are techniques for data storage and warehousing(including an assessment of commercial products and development of proof-of-concept systems); metadata repositories and tools; version control software used to control software versions as they go through the development cycle and production cycles; software development technologies and techniques such as Capability Maturity Model(CMM) for judging the maturity of the software processes of an organization and for identifying the key practices that are required to increase the maturity of these processes; and eXtreme Programming(XP)which provides a deliberate and disciplined approach to software development.

C.3.4.6 Electronic Printing and Release. Studies of electronic printing of forms and electronic reporting of data via EDI, Internet, CATI, CSAQ, TDE, etc. is another area of potential research.

C.3.4.7 Information Technology Accessibility. Research and develop electronic and information technology that is accessible to people with disabilities. For example, develop prototypes for Computerized-Self-Administered-Questionnaires (CSAQ), which may be used by the visually impaired. The visually impaired use special tools such as tactile displays, screen reading software and hardware, and sound cues to allow them to react to messages on a computer screen. Poor screen design can reduce the effectiveness of these tools.

C.3.4.8 Statistical programming. Research, develop and support sophisticated software and information engineering research for statistical design, estimation and analysis. Support the use of SAS analytical software in analysis of research and production data to understand the implication of various research alternatives. This could involve developing a complete SAS application or supporting a SAS development application on Bureau systems. Another potential application is research on new or improved methods of matching and linking records from a variety of sources such Social Security Administration records, the Internal Revenue Service records, the postal service records or other public and vendor supplied sources. Multiple source files must be matched or linked. Since data are often incomplete or inaccurate and files are rarely standardized, computing algorithms, computer automation and computing power are critical to the successful matching of administrative records.

C.3.4.9 Data Security. Research on security and privacy technologies; alternative Work Environment Technologies such as telecommuting, mobile computing, virtual development and electronic collaboration; Customer Relationship Management(CRM) technologies; extensible markup language(XML)/Extensible Stylesheet Language(XSL) and other data exchange technologies; On-Line Analytical Procesing(OLAP) and Data Mining, and network technologies, including directory services, terminal services and desktop and server support

C.3.4.10 Other Services. Other services in this area that may be included are: training on the use and application of high performance computers (standard course offerings or specially designed programs); technical assistance for geoprocessing, computer science, computer operations, statistics, configuration management software evaluation, or other relevant fields in the high performance computing environment; development of software prototypes to address the areas discussed above; and computer services such as CPU time and telecommunications for work done in this area.


C.3.5 SUB-POPULATION RESEARCH

This technical area focuses on research and development of methods for the collection of information for racial and ethnic groups and other sub-populations requiring special enumeration procedures. Historical coverage differentials (with Blacks and other racial and ethnic groups covered at lower rates than the White population) have persisted; and, despite improvements in coverage (overall and differential), there is a need to make continuous improvement in efforts to enumerate these populations. Increasing cultural and language diversity continues to create barriers to counting people. For example, the increasing number of foreign born people in the United States affects concepts and how people react to survey and census concepts and methodologies. The problems associated with literacy add another dimension to coverage differentials.

There also appears to be an increase in the portion of the population that resides transiently or not at all in households, including some components of the institutionalized population (e.g., prisons and jail inmates), group quarters population (e.g., shelter residents), as well as the population with no usual residence. This trend causes difficulty for counting people in the census and in current surveys.

Possible areas of research are:

C.3.5.1 Questionnaire Design. Questionnaire research on the content, wording, and design of the questionnaire to facilitate response, completeness of the questions, and data processing. Research is needed to validate that different population groups understand the survey and census questions and concepts. For example, changes in ethnic composition of the United States need to be considered when designing questionnaire concepts and wording, identification of race and ethnicity, and when completing rosters. Also, the increasing number of persons born outside the United States impact how these people relate to the survey and census concepts and questionnaires. Research should focus on identifying ways to convey these concepts to racial and ethnic groups and other populations requiring special enumeration methodologies.

C.3.5.2 Enumerations Modes. Research to assess if the use of different enumeration methodologies (e.g., self-administered forms, computer-assisted telephone interviews, computer-assisted personal visits interviews, and interviewer-filled forms), have any impact on the respondent's understanding and ability to answer the questions. Finally, research is needed to determine the optimum questions(or questions) for identifying the racial and ethnic composition of the population.

C.3.5.3 Administrative Records. Research on administrative records and how administrative records can supplement census and survey coverage for the traditionally undercounted groups. Research is needed to determine what segments of the population are covered by administrative records and if administrative records can be used to address some of the problems of differential coverage. Research is needed to assess the coverage gain or loss for racial and ethnic groups and other populations requiring special enumeration methodologies if administrative records are used in place of information historically collected in censuses or surveys.

C.3.5.4 Hard-to-Enumerate Methods. Research to assess what special methods (e.g., questionnaire delivery) would improve coverage response of the traditionally difficult to enumerate sub-population groups. For example, in rural areas and on American Indian reservations there are few city-style addresses. This impacts coverage of this population group. Also, special methods may be needed to enumerate people in areas with high seasonal units, or a very mobile population, such as migrant workers, etc. Research should consider what special methods (e.g., questionnaire design, delivery, etc.) would improve response in low response areas, and by historically undercounted population groups.

C.3.5.5 Ethnography. Research barriers to enumeration and investigate applications, methods, outreach, and communications appropriate for population groups defined in categores other than "race" or ethnicity which are identified as requiring special methods for listing, enumeration, and/or enumeration support. Examples include people in migratory or seasonal occupations, communities of language other than English such as recent immigrants, institutions, and group quarters, or rural and remote or other areas difficult to enumerate by conventional methods and those who required accommodations or tailored approaches.


C.3.6 DATA ANALYSIS AND DISSEMINATION

This technical area focuses on subject matter research. The Census Bureau is the largest general-purpose statistical agency in the United States and conducts censuses and surveys of households, individuals, business firms, and governments. The statistics count and profile the people and institutions of the United States and their interaction with the rest of the world. Specifically, the Census Bureau conducts censuses and sample surveys in the areas of population, housing, manufacturing, business(wholesale trade, retail trade, and services), mineral industries, construction, finance, transportation, governments, and foreign trade. Since no data are static, continued research is needed on the subject matter by analyzing the collected data and our dissemination practices to improve the quality and usefulness of the data.

Possible areas of work are:

C.3.6.1 Report Guidelines. Develop general guidelines for analyzing data obtained from new survey designs and re-designs and from new methods of data collection. Survey practitioners analyze survey data in order to write statistically-defensible news releases, articles, and reports for both the general public and for special audiences, such as trade organizations, professional societies, and other survey practitioners. An example of topics that could be explored include the development of data analysis guidelines for new surveys designed to measure e-business activity and business supply-chain issues.

C.3.6.2 Demographic Analysis. Evaluate the current data and methodologies for international migration used in the estimation of the components of international migration (e.g., illegal migration, temporary legal migration, emigration). There is a great deal of interest in policy and academic circles as to how these estimates are derived and the implications of both the estimates and the methodologies used in their calculation.

C.3.6.3 Population Estimates and Projections. Studies focusing on population estimates and projections. Analyses of basic estimated and projected demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the population, of the components of population change and of special population groups are needed. An important area that needs to be researched involves evaluating decennial census counts and deriving methods for measuring undercounts for the United States for geographic areas and major ethnic groups based on methods of demographic analysis.

C.3.6.4 Data Analysis. Analysis of data on the social, demographic and economic characteristics of the survey population, including statistics for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean and selected Asian countries. This includes research on education, families and households, income, housing unit definitions, residence rules, internal migration, race, foreign-born ancestry, Hispanic Origin, etc. It also includes conducting specialized analyses covering population characteristics, macroeconomic (including input-output) accounts, industrial activity, labor force, financial systems and statistical reporting systems. This also includes research on special subjects such as producing analyses and disseminating data on HIV prevalence in Africa, Asia and Latin America and on sub-populations, such as women, those living in group quarters, and those 65 years and older. This also involves analyses of demographic, social, economic and health data to assist in the understanding of the effect of aging populations in the world on economic development and health.

C.3.6.5 Data Dissemination and Presentation. Research new methods for disseminating socio-economic and geographic data using current technology trends in effective user-friendly environments. The Census Bureau has been a leader in applying dissemination methods (e.g. 1980's CD_ROM, 1990's web-based and DVD technology). To exploit the usefulness of these technologies, research in new methods, based on comprehensive user studies, aid in maintaining responsive service to the data user community. This work includes evaluation of data dissemination systems such as Computer-Assisted Software Engineering (CASE) tools, internet, intranet, VoIP, wireless communications, etc., and research on how data users find and interpret economic data by geography, as well as, with changing nature of economic activity (Business-to-Business, eCommerce, etc.), how users find and interpret data by industry and product/line. Research should focus on traditional table-based presentation of data, as well as non-traditional (for Census) presentation methods (including static and dynamic maps, graphs, and charts).

C.3.6.6 Survey Indicators/Measures. Much of the census data is used as components or indicators in indexes. Research and develop alternative measures as benchmarks and indicators. For example, evaluate the pros and cons of alternative ways of measuring benefits and expenses not in the current poverty measurement, such as medical expenses, work expenses, child care expenses, taxes, and the value of noncash benefits (such as subsidized housing and free school lunches). Also involved here are adjustments to poverty thresholds; for example, research is needed to determine or evaluate the effectiveness of various methods of adjusting poverty threshold over time, adjusting them to reflect different family sizes, and adjusting them to reflect the cost of living by area of the country.

C.3.6.8 Cross-Tabulations. Compare statistics across surveys that collect information for the same subject matter. Study the conveyance and the sequencing of questions on the questionnaire for items such as income, wealth, disability status, health insurance coverage, participation in government programs, citizenship status and place of birth. There is also a desire to get consultation from subject matter experts on the use of other data sources--such as exact matches to administrative data and to analyze what improvements, if any, the yields to the quality of the data we collect on surveys.

C.3.6.8 Policy. Evaluate how to make our surveys as relevant as possible to policy makers. Consultation with those with public policy and survey expertise would help us ensure that our surveys remain as relevant to policy makers as possible. For example, are there things the March CPS or SIPP could do to be more relevant as a vehicle for welfare reform evaluations? Also advice and assistance on our housing surveys is needed to study important policy issues, such as: housing programs for the elderly, housing modifications to for the disabled, reverse or home equity conversion mortgages, measures of housing quality, Section 8 housing assistance, and public housing funding allocation formula.

C.3.6.9 Time-Series Analysis. Explore the introduction of improved tools to allow users to do time-series analysis of economic data, given the dynamic nature of classification systems (NAICS, NAPCS, Geographies, etc.) Includes research on the types of data dissemination tools that Census should provide in electronic data dissemination vehicles to allow users to do time-series analysis of Economic Census and annual and indicator survey data. Could include research on tools to dynamically combine data from two or more data sources as well as tools needed to build static combined data sets. Also included are data user tools required to analyze data when 100 percent comparable vs. when they are "close enough" for users' needs (as well as metadata needed to document relationships).


C.4 PERSONNEL SECURITY/SUITABILITY CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS

Census data are protected by Title 13 (T13), and subsequent amendments, of the United States Code. All contract personnel who will have access to Bureau of the Census (BOC) T13 data and/or a site, which contains T13 data, shall have an BOC-approved background clearance prior to being employed by the BOC. BOC-approved background clearances may include the Applicant Name Check, the National Agency Check and Inquiry (NACI), Special Agreement Check (OFI-86C) and/or other BOC-approved previous clearance(s).

Two (2) weeks prior to having access to any BOC site or to any site which contains Census data, the Contractor shall submit to the Contracting Officer two completed FD-258, "Fingerprint Cards," and the required BOC suitability clearance applications below:

These requirements also pertain to project supervisors, management officials, and other contract personnel who plan to visit site(s) containing T13 data.

Should the Contracting Officer receive an unsuitable report on any contract employee as a result of processing the required forms, or should an existing employee under this contract become unsuitable or unfit for assigned duties in this regard, the Contractor shall be advised by the Government that such employee cannot be assigned to work or continue to work under the contract. The Contractor shall immediately remove any such employee and begin the process to replace him/her with a suitable substitute.

Potential contract employees who have previously had their suitability determined may not need to submit forms, pending verification to the BOC by the prior Government agency or unless one (1) calendar year or more has elapsed since they last started work under a BOC or General Services Administration contract. These potential contract employees shall, however, submit in lieu of BOC required paperwork and prior to BOC employment, a statement on Government letterhead that they have a current suitability determination. In addition to being submitted on the respective agency's letterhead, the statement shall also list a point-of-contact including an up-to-date telephone number, contract number(s), and performance dates for contracts on which they have or are currently participating, which required such a determination.


C.4.1 TITLE 13 AND NON-DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

Given that Census data are protected by Title 13 and subsequent amendments, any potential contractor who may have access to Title 13 information shall be required to complete the BOC form BC-1759, Application for Special Sworn Status, shall take the BOC Oath of Non-disclosure of the data, and shall be subject to penalties prescribed in Title 13. The Oath will be administered after completion of a favorable pre-employment check by an authorized BOC official immediately upon assignment to a BOC contract, or upon issuance of a BOC Contractor badge, and prior to access of a facility containing Title 13 data. This requirement also pertains to project supervisors, management officials, and other contract personnel who may come into contact with T13 data.


C.5 QUALIFICATIONS OF CONTRACTOR PERSONNEL

The following labor categories contain qualifications as they relate to the education and number of years of experience we have determined necessary to perform the task in each technical area. Te required qualifications reflect the relative importance of each category. All persons provided by the Contractor to perform work specified by individual task orders shall be fully qualified as described below. On a technical area basis, Contractors may propose exceptional expertise or unique experience in lieu of the exact number of years experience or formal education. The minimum years education requirement may be substituted with equivalent years of applicable experience. The general experience requirement is inclusive of any additional specialized experience requirement. The government solely determines if that is sufficient.

The Bureau of the Census may add new technical areas and additional labor categories during the course of this contract to reflect changes in technology or the government's needs, provided the technical areas and labor categories fall within the general scope of work for this contract, which is for research and development services.

For each task order the Contractor shall provide a Task Manager and a Task Administrator who is responsible for the technical direction of the task and the administrative oversight of the task, respectfully. The following categories of labor are applicable to each of the areas as specified.


C.5.1 *(1) PROJECT DIRECTOR

The Contractor shall provide a Project Director for the duration of the contract. The Project Director serves as liaison between contractor personnel and the Contracting Officer's Technical Representative (COTR) and shall have overall responsibility for administrative matters. The Project Director shall organize task teams, review technical approaches to ensure that the proper methodologies and procedures are followed in accordance with task order requirements, and ensure that all products and services are of high quality and delivered on time and within budget limitations.

The Project Director shall be a senior member of the Contractor's organization with a minimum of six (6) years experience at the senior management level. At least four (4) years of experience managing multidisciplinary efforts similar to this procurement and ten (10) years of progressively responsible professional experience are required. The Project Director shall have at least a Bachelors Degree in one of the following disciplines: engineering, statistics, computer science, management information or a social science. Advanced degrees in these disciplines are highly desirable.


C.5.2 * TASK MANAGER

The Task Manager is responsible for the technical management and leadership for each task assigned. The Task Manager must have a Bachelors degree in a field related to the task subject area and a minimum of two (2) years experience managing tasks similar to those described in the subject area for which the individual is being proposed. In addition, the task manager must have (10) years experience specifically related to the work in the subject area.


C.5.3 * TASK ADMINISTRATOR

The task administrator is responsible for the administrative management of the task, such as progress reports, invoices and deliverables. The Task Administrator must have an Associates degree and two(2) years experience or four(4) years experience administering government contracts.


C.5.4 ASSESSMENT, PLANNING AND ANALYSIS PERSONNEL

  1. * Senior Marketing Specialist/Researcher. Master's degree in marketing and five (5) years experience with large consumer-oriented organization in all aspects of marketing. Three (3) years experience is required in developing market strategies and products based on user needs. Familiarity with spreadsheet and database software is required.
  2. * Senior Systems Analyst/Technologist. Bachelor's degree (Masters preferred) in Management Information, Computer Science, Engineering, Business or related scientific or technical discipline and ten (10) years experience in information and communications technology. Five (5) years progressive experience analyzing user needs to determine functional requirements for hardware or software systems and determining functional requirements for analysis and definition of business needs or one or more specific technologies being assessed is required. A graduate degree in Information Systems, Business, or a related field will be considered equivalent to one (1) year of experience.
  3. * Senior Cost Analyst. Bachelor's degree in Economics, Mathematics or related technical discipline. Eight (8) years of experience analyzing and developing criteria for determining the need for benefit/cost analyses and developing methodologies, tools, and procedures to perform benefit/cost analyses of information systems alternatives. A Graduate degree in Computer Science or Operations Research will be equivalent to two (2) years of experience.
  4. * Principal Senior Systems Engineer. A Bachelor's degree with a mathematics intensive major. Ten (10) years of progressive experience in systems engineering and analysis. Two (2) years directing high-level systems engineering, analysis, design, documentation, and implementation of very complex applications and directing and participating in all phases of software development with emphasis on the planning, engineering, analysis, testing and acceptance phases.
  5. * Telecommunications Specialist. Six (6) years of experience analyzing network and computer communications hardware and software characteristics; recommending equipment enhancements, removals, software upgrades, and modifications; and designing optimized network topologies and site configurations. A Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related study will be considered equivalent to one (1) year of experience. A Graduate degree in Computer Science or related study will be equivalent to two (2) years of experience.
  6. * Management Analyst. Bachelors degree in management, business management, or related discipline and five (5) years experience in management analysis of information and communications technology. Two (2) years experience specifically related to business case planning is required.
  7. Systems Engineer. A Bachelor's degree with a mathematics intensive major. Eight (8) years progressive experience in systems engineering and analysis in broad based ADP settings including contemporary computer hardware and programming languages. Experience is required in all phases of systems life cycle including planning, analysis, design, documentation, testing, acceptance, implementation and maintenance of very complex applications.
  8. Senior Cartographer. A Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and five (5) years experience in one or more of the following: cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and spatial databases. Experience includes research or operations from 1) established academic program in geography, cartography, and/or geographic information science, and/or 2) private or government organization employing large spatial databases to support geography, cartography and GIS programs. Specialized experience is considered in areas of remote sensing, air photo interpretation, global positioning systems, and mobile geographic field update technology.
  9. Cartographer. Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and three (3) years experience in one or more of the following: cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and spatial databases. Experience includes extensive use of COTS GIS software for analysis and/or map production and use of spatial databases. Specialized experience is considered in areas of remote sensing, air photo interpretation, global positioning systems, and mobile geographic field update technology.
  10. Geographer. Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and three (3) years experience in one or more of the following: legal, administrative, and/or statistical geographic areas; geographic analysis using COTS GIS software; urban planning; and extensive use of geospatial databases. Specialized experience is considered in areas of remote sensing, air photo interpretation, global positioning systems, and mobile geographic field update technology.
  11. Economist. PhD in economics with a specialization in econometric theory applied to demographic, economic, and geographic data. Five (5) years experience in modeling development research and/or projects is required. Evidence of research includes relationships between demographic, economic and geographic data that can be used to support management and operational requirements.
  12. Program Analyst. Bachelors degree in management information, computer science, business or economics, engineering or related discipline and five (5) years experience in market analysis of information and communications technology. Two (2) years experience specifically related to technology assessment is required.

C.5.5 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS PERSONNEL

  1. * Senior Mathematical Statistician. Ph.D. in statistics or mathematics and ten (10) years experience in performing a variety of statistical analyses using various statistical techniques. Five (5) years experience specifically related to applied statistics in social or economic measurement systems, as appropriate to the task, is required. Experience in the oversight and direction of sound statistical methods is required.
  2. * Senior Statistical Programmer. Bachelor's degree in computer science, mathematics, or related discipline and seven (7) years experience using, developing, modifying and maintaining analytical software or ten (10) years experience in using, developing, modifying, maintaining analytical software.
  3. Senior Data Analyst. A Bachelor's degree and ten(10) years experience in analyzing survey data and using the results of such analyses to write statistically defensible news releases, articles, and reports for both the general public and for special audiences, such as survey practitioners, trade organizations, and professional societies. Experience in developing general guidelines for analyzing data obtained from new survey designs and re-designs and from new data collection methods is highly desirable. Economics experience or education would be helpful but not necessary.
  4. Mathematical Statistician. Master's degree and five (5) years of relevant experience in a variety of statistical methods. Experience is required in sampling, weighting, variance estimation, modeling, and imputation.
  5. Junior Mathematical Statistician. Bachelor's degree and five(5) years of relevant experience in a variety of statistical methods. Experience is required in sampling, weighting, variance estimation, modeling, and imputation.
  6. Statistical Programmer. Bachelor's degree in computer science, mathematics, or related discipline and two (2) years experience using, developing, modifying and maintaining analytical software or five (5) years experience in using, developing, modifying, maintaining analytical software.
  7. Principal Researcher. Master's degree and eight (8) years of relevant experience associated with a specific skill or a unique area of expertise. The duties are developing and implementing statistical methodology based on the unique skill or area of expertise using sound statistical methods.
  8. Senior Cartographer/Geographer. Ph.D. in cartography or geography and five (5) years experience in the use of spatial databases, geographic information systems (GIS) technology and socio-economic data. Evidence of research is indicated through publications and/or projects on topics such as: mobile field update technology; time and distance measurements related to work units; user-defined geography based on point and areal locations combined with socioeconomic data; differencing in geospatial data; and/or issues in geographic and statistical data confidentiality.

C.5.6 METHODOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERSONNEL

  1. * Senior Methodologist. Ph.D. in anthropology, sociology, psychology, statistics, survey methodology, economics, or political science and ten (10) years experience in all aspects of survey design and operations. Five (5) years experience using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI), Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI), or other survey technologies is highly desirable. Five (5) years experience designing and conducting focus groups, cognitive research, and designing questionnaires is highly desirable.
  2. * Sampling Statistician. Master's degree and five (5) years relevant experience in sampling designs including, random digit dialing samples, multistage probability samples, and mixed frame designs.
  3. Methodologist. Master's degree and five (5) years experience in all aspects of survey design and operations. Three (3) years of experience designing and conducting focus groups, cognitive research, and designing questionnaires is required.
  4. Survey Specialist. Bachelor's degree and five (5) years relevant experience in designing, coordinating, and conducting surveys and analyzing survey results using SAS or other statistical packages. Advanced degree is highly desirable.
  5. Graphic Artist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in form design and layout.
  6. Interviewer. Minimum of one (1) year experience conducting face-to-face or telephone structured interviews, three (3) months experience with CATI and/or CAPI interviewing technologies. CATI/CAPI experience requirement may be waived if not relevant for a specific task.
  7. Media Specialist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in designing media campaigns and accompanying materials. One (1) year experience working with media campaigns and materials for minority and special populations is highly desirable.
  8. Technical Writer. Minimum of three (3) years experience in specifying and documenting research that is statistically-based.
  9. Labor Economist. PhD in economics with ten or more years experience in labor economics and econometric research. Five or more years of relevant experience with analyses of Bureau of Labor Statistics workforce and pay rate data. Previous experience working with government agencies that recruit and hire large work forces.
  10. Instructional Design Specialist. PhD in education or instructional design/development with ten or more years work experience in at least 3 of the 5 following areas: adult learning theory and/or the psychology of adult learning; instructional design practices; educational evaluation; instructional product development ; computers and the use of technology in education/training. Previous experience working with government agencies that recruit and train large work forces.

C.5.7 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES PERSONNEL

  1. * Senior Computer Scientist. Master's degree in computer science, management information, engineering, mathematics, or related scientific discipline and ten (10) years of experience in information technology. A doctorate in one of these fields is highly desirable.
  2. * Senior Information Technologist/Computer Specialist. Bachelor's degree in computer science, management information systems, engineering, or related scientific discipline with seven (7)or more years experience in information technology. Two (2) additional years experience is required in specific technology area (e.g. Communications and Network Services, Customer Support, Data Management, Information Systems Security, Policy, Planning and Management, Software Engineering, Applications, Software Engineering, Systems, Systems Administration, Systems Analysis, Web Development)
  3. Senior Computer Programmer. Bachelor's degree in computer science, mathematics, or related discipline and seven (7) years experience developing, modifying, and maintaining systems and applications software. Bachelor's degree and ten (10) years experience developing, modifying, and maintaining systems and applications software may be substituted for a masters degree.
  4. Computer Scientist. Bachelor's degree in computer science, management information, engineering, mathematics, or related scientific discipline and seven(7) years experience.
  5. Information Technology Specialist. Bachelors degree in computer science, management information systems, engineering, or related scientific discipline with two (2)or more years experience in information technology. Seven (7) years experience in information technology maybe substituted for a Bachelor's degree.
  6. Programmer. Bachelor's degree and four(4) years experience in systems and applications programming. Seven (7) years experience in systems and applications programming may be substituted for a Bachelor's degree.
  7. Quality Assurance Specialist. Bachelor's degree in statistics, operations research or related scientific discipline with four(4) years experience in quality assurance and control.
  8. Requirements Engineer. Bachelor's degree in systems or computer engineering with eight(8) years experience in technical projects/programs for Government/Industry customers. Prior system engineering experience, including the process to identify, collect and baseline stakeholder needs, expectations, and constraints; analyze and quantify functionality based on customer requirements; derive, from the functional needs and other constraints/standards/guidance, requirements that may be logically inferred and implied as essential to system effectiveness; and transform customer/user needs into a set of system level requirements. Support definition of a system requirement baseline.
  9. Human Factor Specialist. Master's degree in Human Factors/Ergonomics, Human-Computer Interaction, cognitive Psychology, Interaction Design, or similar relevant topic with a speciality in computer software user interface design, both graphical user interface (GUI) and Web user interface(WUI) application design. Also, four or more years of industry experience as a hands-ons Human Factors practitioner and usability evaluation specialist.
  10. Graphic Artist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in computer design and layout.
  11. Media Specialist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in designing media campaigns and accompanying materials. One (1) year experience working with media campaigns and materials for minority and special populations is highly desirable.
  12. Technical Writer. Minimum of three (3) years experience in specifying and documenting processes and applications that are computer-based.
  13. Senior Cartographer/Geographer. Ph.D. in cartography or geography and five (5) years experience in the design of spatial databases, geographic information systems (GIS) technology or geo-spatial imagery. Evidence of research is indicated through publications and/or projects on topics such as: spatial database modeling, spatial database design, new GIS functionality, remote sensing, spatial change detection, geographic and cartographic object classification, and global positioning systems.
  14. Cartographer/Geographer. Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and three (3) years experience in one or more of the following: design of spatial databases, geographic information systems (GIS) technology or geo-spatial imagery. Specialized experience is considered in areas of modeling, spatial database design, new GIS functionality, remote sensing, spatial change detection, geographic and cartographic object classification, and global positioning systems.
  15. Spatial Database Developer. Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and five (5) years experience in spatial database design and implementation. Specialized experience should include evidence of hardware and COTS GIS software systems requirements development, measurement methods of spatial database performance, and geoprocessing prediction and evaluation tools.
  16. Hardware Configuration Engineer. Master's degree (Ph.D. preferred) and five (5) years experience in configuration of hardware to support COTS GIS software. Specialized experience should include evidence of hardware configuration models and diagrams, network communications requirements, and systems requirements for COTS GIS software.

C.5.8 SUB-POPULATION RESEARCH

  1. * Senior Social Scientist. Ph.D. in anthropology, sociology, psychology, or political science and seven (7) years experience in conducting focus groups, cognitive research and designing questionnaires.
  2. * Survey Methodologist. Master's degree and five (5) years experience in all aspects of survey design and operations. Three (3) years of experience designing and conducting surveys related to minority and special populations is required.
  3. Sampling Statistician. Master's degree and five (5) years relevant experience in sampling designs including, multistage probability samples and mixed frame designs.
  4. Survey Specialist. Bachelor's degree and five (5) years relevant experience in designing, coordinating, and conducting surveys and analyzing survey results using SAS or other statistical packages. Two (2) years of experience working with minority and special population surveys is required. Advanced degree is highly desirable.
  5. Graphic Artist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in form design and layout.
  6. Media Specialist. Minimum of three (3) years experience in designing media campaigns and accompanying materials. One (1) year experience working with media campaigns and materials for minority and special populations is highly desirable.
  7. Interviewer. Minimum of one (1) year experience conducting face-to-face or telephone structured interviews, three (3) months experience with CATI and/or CAPI interviewing technologies. Relevant language proficiency and experiences with hard-to-enumerate populations is required. The CATI/CAPI experience requirement maybe waived if not relevant for a specific task.

C.5.9 DATA ANALYSIS AND DISSEMINATION

  1. * Senior Subject Matter Specialist. Ph.D. in economics, demography, sociology, psychology, statistics, political science, or other discipline related to the task subject area and ten (10) years experience in all aspects of survey design and operations.
  2. * Senior Data Analyst. A Bachelor's degree and ten(10) years experience in analyzing survey data and using the results of such analyses to write statistically-defensible news releases, articles, and reports for both the general public and for special audiences, such as survey practitioners, trade organizations, and professional societies. Experience in developing general guidelines for analyzing data obtained from new survey designs and re-designs and from new data collection methods is highly desirable. Economics experience or education would be helpful but not necessary.
  3. Subject Matter Specialist. Master's degree in economics, demography, sociology, psychology, statistics, political science, or other discipline related to the task subject area and five (5) years experience in all aspects of survey design and operations.
  4. Principal Researcher. Master's degree and eight (8) years of relevant experience associated with a specific skill or a unique area of expertise. The duties are developing and implementing statistical methodology based on the unique skill or area of expertise using sound statistical methods.
  5. Technical Writer. Minimum of three (3) years experience in specifying and documenting statistically- and analytically-based research.

C.5.10 RESEARCH ASSISTANT SERVICES

A research assistant may be proposed for each task area. General qualifications shall include a Bachelor's degree in the related subject area for which the individual is being proposed and two (2) years experience in performing analyses. Specific experience with SAS or other statistical software packages is required. For related experience required see descriptions under each specific area.


C.6 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE GOVERNMENT

Government-furnished subject-matter specialists, space, equipment, computer files, other data, and time that are necessary to perform a task will be specified in each individual task order.


C.7 CORRECTION OF SOFTWARE AND DOCUMENTATION

The Contractor shall, over the term of the contract, correct errors in contractor developed software and applicable documentation which are discovered by the government, any other user of the software, or the Contractor. Such corrections shall be made within 30 days (or a mutually agreed date) of the date the Contractor is notified that the error exists or the date the Contractor discovers the error. Further, the Contractor agrees to provide such corrections (fixes) at no charge to the Government unless the error is a direct result of negligence of the government, or is a direct result of Government modification to the software. Inability of the parties to determine the cause of software errors shall be resolved in accordance with the disputes clause in Section I of this contract, but in no event constitutes grounds for delay of error correction beyond the time frames specified above.


SECTIONS  D - K  WILL BE AVAILABLE AT A LATER DATE.


SECTION L - INSTRUCTIONS, CONDITIONS, AND NOTICES TO OFFERORS


L.1 SOLICITATION PROVISIONS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
      (FAR 52.252- 2) (FEB 1998)

This solicitation incorporates the following provisions by reference with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer (CO) will make their full text available. The offeror is cautioned that the listed provisions may include blocks that must be completed by the offeror and submitted with its quotations or offer. In lieu of submitting the full text of those provisions, the offeror may identify the provision by paragraph identifier and provide the appropriate information with its quotation or offer. Also the full text of a solicitation provision may be accessed electronically at this URL: http://www.ARNet.gov/far.

FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR) (48 CFR CHAPTER 1) SOLICITATION PROVISIONS

FAR
CLAUSE
TITLE DATE
52.214-34 SUBMISSION OF OFFERS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE APR 1991
52.214-35 SUBMISSION OF OFFERS IN U.S. CURRENCY APR 1991
52.215-5 SOLICITATION DEFINITIONS JUL 1987
52.215-7 UNNECESSARILY ELABORATE PROPOSALS OR QUOTATIONS APR 1984
52.215-8 AMENDMENTS TO SOLICITATIONS DEC 1989
52.215-9 SUBMISSION OF OFFERS FEB 1997
52.215-10 LATE SUBMISSIONS, MODIFICATIONS, AND WITHDRAWALS OF PROPOSALS FEB 1997
52.215-12 RESTRICTION ON DISCLOSURE AND USE OF DATA APR 1984
52.215-13 PREPARATION OF OFFERS APR 1984
52.215-14 EXPLANATION TO PROSPECTIVE OFFERORS APR 1984
52.215-15 FAILURE TO SUBMIT OFFER JUL 1995
52.215-16 CONTRACT AWARD OCT 1995
52.215-30 FACILITIES CAPITAL COST OF MONEY SEP 1987
52.216-27 SINGLE OR MULTIPLE AWARDS OCT 1995
52.216-28 MULTIPLE AWARDS FOR ADVISORY AND ASSISTANCE OCT 1995
52.222-24 PREAWARD ON SITE EQUAL OPPORTUNITY COMPLIANCE REVIEW APR 1984
52.222-46 EVALUATION OF COMPENSATION FOR PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES FEB 1993

L.2 SUBMISSION OF PROPOSAL

  1. MARKINGS: It is important that the offer is sealed and the outer envelope or wrapping of the offer is addressed as follows:

    Mailing Address:
    Ms. Donna Souders
    U.S. Census Bureau
    4700 Silver Hill Rd, Stop 1700
    Washington, DC 20233-1700
    Solicitation No. 52-SOBC-1-00002

    Date and Hour: TBD

    Note: Failure to correctly mark the outer cover could be the cause of the offer being misdirected and received too late at the required destination as shown above.

  2. Offers shall be delivered to the office cited above and also cited in SF33, Block 7, or if hand carried offers must be delivered to the physical address below and contact must be made by the time and date specified above and in SF33, Block 9. Offerors that hand carry offers to the address below should allow extra time for clearance into the Suitland Federal Complex and for packages to be scanned upon entrance to FOB 3. Offers received at Room 1557 after time and date specified for receipt shall be considered late.
  3. Physical Address:
    Bureau of the Census
    Acquisition Division, Rm. 1557-3
    4700 Silver Hill Road
    Suitland, MD 20746-1700
    Attn: Ms. Donna Souders

    Solicitation No. 52-SOBC-1-00002


L.3 SERVICE OF PROTEST

An agency level protest may be files with either the Contracting Officer or the agency protest decision authority. See Section J, Attachment #5 for procedures for filing an agency protest with the protest decision authority.

Agency protest filed with the Contracting Officer shall be sent to the following address:

Bureau of the Census
Acquisition Division
Room 1557, FOB3
4700 Silver Hill Road, Stop 1700
Suitland, MD 20746

Attn: William H. Russell, Contracting Officer

If a protest is filed with the General Accounting Office (GAO), a complete copy of the protest and all attachments shall be served upon the Contracting Officer as well as the Contract Law Division of the General Counsel within one day of filing with GAO. Service upon the Contract Law Division is to be made as follows:

U. S. Department of Commerce
Herbert C. Hoover Building, Room H5893
14th Street between Pennsylvania and Constitution Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20230

Attn: Jerry Walz


L.3.1 AGENCY PROTEST

  1. The Department of Commerce requests that any disputes or disagreements resulting from this acquisition be resolved informally through discussions or by the use of alternate disputes resolution, in particular, the use of agency-level protest procedures under the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR 33.103) and applicable Department of Commerce guidelines. An agency protest filed with the Contracting Officer must be sent to the following address:

    U.S. Census Bureau
    Acquisition Division
    Rm. 1557, FOB 3
    4700 Silver Hill Road, Stop 1700
    Suitland, MD 20746

    Attn: William H. Russell

  2. A copy of the agency protest procedures, for protests above the Contracting Officer level, is included as Attachment #5, Section J.

L.4 TYPE OF CONTRACT

The Government contemplates awarding multiple indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity labor hour (task order) contracts for services resulting from this solicitation. Offerors may propose on one or more of the technical areas; however, they may not offer on a subset of an area. The offeror must offer firm fixed prices for all labor categories specified in Section B for the technical area for which it is proposing for a base year and four one year options. Offerors must propose on all technical requirements as described in Section C of this document. It is anticipated that some tasks may be issued on a firm fixed price basis (based on estimated number of hours and established labor hour rates) and some on a labor hour basis with a Not-To-Exceed ceiling price.


L.5 ACCEPTANCE OF PROPOSALS

The Government reserves the right:

  1. To consider as acceptable only those proposals submitted according to all technical requirements stated or referenced in this solicitation which demonstrate an understanding of the requirements and the scope of the project.
  2. To reject, as unacceptable, proposals deleting or altering technical requirements.

L.6 EXTENT OF COMPETITION

This is a full and open competition. A Subcontracting Plan is required prior to award, and must follow the content in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR 19.704). No set-asides are mandated, but offeror(s) are encouraged to propose reasonable, appropriate, attainable, and aggressive goals for subcontracting direct and indirect costs to small businesses, wherever possible, including those certified as 8(a); small disadvantaged, and small and/or disadvantaged women-owned businesses.


L.7 SOLICITATION

Offerors shall submit one fully executed copy of the SF33, Solicitation, Offer and Award including all amendments and completion of the representations and certifications found in Section K. The fully executed copy of the representations and certifications shall be included in Part II entitled, "Price and Other Business Factors."


L.8 ALTERNATE PROPOSALS

If an offeror intends to make an alternate proposal of terms and conditions that differ from or supplement those contained in the model contract, then the offeror must state those alternate terms and conditions in a letter attached to the offer. The same representative of the offeror who signed SF 33, block 17, must sign the letter. The Government warns offerors that it intends to award this contract without discussions, in accordance with FAR 15.610(a) and 52.215-16(c) (Alternate II). By making an alternate proposal the offeror may, either intentionally or inadvertently, render its proposal unacceptable, unless the RFP expressly states that the Government will entertain an alternative proposal with regard to a specific term or condition of the request for proposals. In the absence of discussions, the Government will not give offerors an opportunity to modify their proposals to eliminate deficiencies. Offerors who have questions in this regard should submit them in writing to the Contracting Officer in sufficient time for a response before the deadline for the receipt of proposals TBD.


L.9 LATE SUBMISSIONS

The Government will process late submissions of offers in accordance with FAR 52.215-1. If an offer is received late and is not eligible for consideration in accordance with FAR 52.215-1, then the Government will reject that offer without evaluation.


L.10 MINIMUM ACCEPTANCE PERIOD

Offerors allowing less than 180 calendar days in the "offer" portion of Standard Form 33 entitled, "Solicitation, Offer, and Award" for acceptance by the Government will be rejected as nonresponsive and unacceptable.


L.11 PRE-AWARD SURVEY

  1. The general and additional minimum standards for responsible prospective Contractors and Subcontractors are set forth in the FAR Part 9.
  2. The CO may request a pre-award survey in accordance with the FAR 9.106 and may solicit from available sources, relevant information concerning the Offeror's record of past performance, and use such information in making determinations of prospective Offerors responsibility.
  3. If your offer is one of those favorably considered, a survey team may contact your facility to determine your financial and technical ability to perform the required tasks.
  4. In addition, Offerors are hereby advised that the apparently successful offeror, as a condition of award of any contract resulting from this solicitation, may be required to execute a certification related to business integrity.

L.12 FORMAL COMMUNICATION - REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION(S) OR QUESTIONS REGARDING THIS RFP

  1. Formal communications and specific requests for clarification(s) and/or information concerning this solicitation shall be submitted in writing to the CO at the following Email address:

    Email: acq.vius@census.gov

  2. All such requests shall be in electronic form and submitted to the above address. In an effort to provide early notice, questions and clarifications may be submitted via E-Mail to acq.r&d.2007@census.gov. In order to avoid attachment conversion problems, all questions submitted via E-Mail shall be contained in the body of the E-Mail message, i.e, not as an attachment to the E-Mail message.

  3. Any questions regarding the RFP shall be received by the CO within ten (10) calendar days from the RFP issue date in order to be considered for a response(s).

  4. Amendments to the solicitation and answers to questions will be posted on the BOC Internet Web page. Offerors will be able to download the RFP, amendments to the solicitation and answers to questions by using the BOC Internet Web page. The address for the web page is http://www.census.gov/procur/www/rd2007.

  5. No information concerning this solicitation or requests for clarification will be provided in response to telephone calls from Offerors.


L.13 PRIME CONTRACTOR RESPONSIBILITIES

The Offeror shall be held responsible as the Prime Contractor for the procurement of all services required under this contract. The Offeror alone shall be held responsible by the Government for performance of all Contractor's obligations under any contract resulting from their proposal. The Government in turn shall render all payments due from services performed solely to the prime Contractor.


L.14 AMENDMENTS TO PROPOSAL

Any changes to a proposal made by the Offeror after its initial submission shall be accomplished by replacement pages of a different color than the original submission. Changes from the original page shall be indicated on the outside margin by vertical lines adjacent to the change. The Offeror shall include the date of the amendment at the bottom of the changed pages. Any revisions to proposals shall be due no later than the scheduled date for Offeror's Oral Presentation.


L.15 ANTICIPATED AWARD DATE

The anticipated contract award date for this solicitation is on or about TO BE DETERMINED. The anticipated effective date of the contract will be the award date of the contract. The Government is not obligated to award the contract on this date.


L.16 SET-ASIDE/SIZE STANDARD INFORMATION (CAR 1352.219-70)

For purposes of the "Small Business Concern Representation" in Section K, the North American Industrial Classification Standard, (NAICS) information for this procurement is as follows:

This solicitation includes the following set-aside and/or size standard criteria:

  1. Percent of the set-aside: 0%
  2. Type of set-aside: None
  3. Size standard or other criteria:
  4. NAICS: 54169 For all areas; Small business size standard is $3.5 Million.

L.17 EVALUATION PHASES AND COMPETITIVE RANGE DETERMINATION

The evaluation will proceed in two phases, Phase I, Written; and Phase II, Oral as detailed below. If the Offeror fails to submit either a written proposal or conduct an oral presentation as scheduled, the entire offer will be considered nonresponsive.

  1. Phase I: Written Proposal
    1. Phase I, Written: Proposals will be evaluated based on the evaluation criteria described in Section M, the instructions in Section B, Cost/Pricing data, and all other terms and conditions of the RFP.
    2. A Competitive Range Determination will be made based upon written proposals. Only those offerors who are determined to be in the competitive range will be scheduled to provide an Oral presentation. At the conclusion of Phase I, successful offerors will be notified and scheduled for Phase II, Oral Presentation.

  2. Phase II: Oral Presentation

    1. Phase II, Oral Presentation: Offerors in the competitive range must show their familiarity with and understanding of the work, it would have to perform under the prospective contract.
    2. Following the oral presentation, the offerors may be required to participate in a question and answer (Q&A) session. This Q&A session will not constitute discussions as defined in FAR 15.306(d). Discussions may be conducted with offerors following at anytime determined necessary by the Government in accordance with the FAR 15.306.

L.18 INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF TECHNICAL AND COST PROPOSALS

L.18.1 WRITTEN PROPOSAL INSTRUCTIONS

  1. The written proposals shall be provided in three volumes, as follows:

    Volume I Past Performance and Experience

    Volume II Technical - Executive Summary and Resumes for Proposed Personnel

    Volume III Price and Other Business Factors

  2. The written proposal will be evaluated on the information submitted in Volumes I, II and III. Organization, clarity, accuracy of information, relevance, and completeness are of prime importance.

  3. Offerors shall submit only the information required by each section. Marketing literature, marketing or product videos, catalogs, manuals, product literature, or other extraneous information, either electronic or hardcopy, which is provided with the proposal will not be reviewed or utilized in the evaluation.

  4. This request for proposals is written in the Uniform Contract Format described in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Section 15.406. Offerors are encouraged to familiarized themselves with the Uniform Contract Format. This will facilitate their understanding of the terms and conditions of this solicitation, the instructions which follow, and the source selection process.

  5. The evaluation board will consider any failure to conform to these instructions and rules and any attempt to evade these specifications and rules on the basis of technicalities as indication of the kind of behavior that it may expect from the Offeror during contract performance. The board will take this into account when making its evaluation. If an Offeror does not understand these instructions, then it should write to the CO for clarification sufficiently in advance of the deadline for the receipt of offers to get an answer in time to meet the deadline for proposal submission. Offerors will be able to download the Solicitation, amendments to the solicitation and answers to questions by using the BOC Internet Web page: http://www.census.gov/procur/www/rd2007.


L.18.2 OFFER

The Offer is the "proposal," as that term is defined and used in the Federal Acquisition Regulations, (FAR). The offer must show that the offeror agrees to the terms and conditions of the model contract of this solicitation, which consists of Request for Proposal (RFP) Sections A through K, including all documents, exhibits, and other attachments, that are incorporated therein by reference and made a part thereof. The Offeror's agreement to all of those terms and conditions is mandatory, unless this solicitation states otherwise by express exception with regard to a specific term or condition. In order to show its agreement, the Offeror must complete and submit the following three items as its Offer without exception or reservation:

RFP Section A, Standard Form (SF) 33, "Solicitation, Offer and Award," blocks 12 through 18; (original and 3 copies)

A separate proposal must be prepared for each technical area in which the offeror wishes to be considered. The cover of the proposal must identify, by title, the technical area for which the offeror wishes to be considered appropriately marked, i.e., Methodological Research, Data Analysis and Dissemination.


L.19 VOLUME I: PAST PERFORMANCE AND EXPERIENCE

The proposal shall contain the information described below. Evaluation criteria for this is provided in Section M. Past performance information must be submitted to the address specified in paragraph L.3 by TBD.

Offerors shall submit written descriptions for any Federal, State, or Local Government, or commercial contracts which are consistent in size and complexity to the RFP. The requirements for past experiences are as follows:

  1. The Offeror shall provide up to five relevant past performance experiences.. The last day of the period of performance for the experience(s) can be no longer than three years prior to the release date of this RFP. Past performance experience may include experience as a prime or as a subcontractor.
  2. Offerors shall provide past performance references for five (5) of their most recent contracts on the Form provided in Section J, Attachment 1. Offerors shall provide past performance information in accordance with the instructions and using the matrix template provided in Section J, Attachment 2. No alterations shall be made to the template. Offerors shall use only the alloted space for each numbered item.
  3. The Offerors shall send to the proposed references, specified in Attachment 1, the questionnaires included in Section J, Attachment 3 to all of the client references specified in Attachment A. The client will complete and forward the form to the BOC. The Government may notify the offeror if the reference is not responding to the questionnaire. The Government may also follow up by phone or in person to clarify and complete the questionnaires.
  4. The experiences selected for submission by the Offeror shall be those that provide evidence which can be validated by the Government via reference checks, utilization of other contacts, or any other available information. Any past performance information provided by an Offeror in its proposal is subject to verification/validation by the Government during the evaluation and pre-award survey process. The Government reserves the right to contact the Government /commercial point of contact provided by the Offeror and any project officials and/or other persons who have been involved in any of the contracts listed by the Offeror in its proposal, for the purposes of verifying the information provided and obtaining additional information concerning the Offeror's performance on these contracts. The Government also reserves the right to use any information available, irrespective of the source, in the evaluation of past performance. This applies to the Offeror and any proposed teaming partners/subcontractors.

L.20 VOLUME II: TECHNICAL - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND KEY PERSONNEL

In this section the offeror shall include the following information:

L.20.1 Executive Summary        NOT TO EXCEED 3 PAGES

An executive summary describing the Offeror's general background, organization, capabilities, subcontracting plans, experience and other pertinent information. This information must not exceed three (3) typewritten pages. This must also include the name and telephone number for the person the Government should contact to schedule the oral presentation, in the event the Offeror is required to give a presentation.


L.20.2 Resumes for Key Personnel        NOT TO EXCEED 3 PAGES

Offerors shall propose Key Personnel deemed necessary to satisfy the requirements of this solicitation. Offerors shall support their proposed key personnel with resumes that demonstrate breadth, depth, and quality of relevant experience. Resumes must be submitted for all key personnel. Proposed key personnel are those persons, who will occupy all of the following positions (see Section C for the duties and qualifications of these positions) for the term of the prospective contract:

FOR ALL SUBJECT AREAS: - Project Director
- Task Manager
- Task Administrator

For Assessement,
   Planning and Analysis:
- Senior Marketing Specialist/Researcher
- Senior Cost Analyst
- Senior Systems Analyst/Technologist
- Principal Senior Systems Engineer
- Telecommunications Specialist
- Management Analyst

For Statistical Analysis: - Senior Mathematical Statistician
- Senior Statistical Programmer

For Methodological Research: - Senior Methodologist
- Sampling Statistician

For Technology Services: - Senior Computer Scientist
- Senior Information Technologist/Computer Specialist

For Sub-Population Research: - Senior Social Scientist
- Survey Methodologist

For Data Analysis and
   Dissemination:
- Senior Subject Matter Specialist
- Senior Data Analyst

  1. In addition, the Offeror shall provide a letter of commitment that provides evidence of the corporate intent to commit these Key Personnel in the service of the R&D 2007 project from the date of contract award. The letter of commitment shall include the name of each person whose resume is provided.
  2. In addition, for consultants and/or subcontracted individuals for key positions, the Offeror must submit evidence of a contract employment and/or consultant agreement. Phone numbers must current and reachable for reference.
  3. Resumes should be current, updated within the past year. Each resume shall be limited to three pages. Resume pages in excess of the page totals described above will not be evaluated.

L.21 VOLUME III - PRICE AND OTHER BUSINESS FACTORS


L.21.1 PRICE

  1. The Price Proposal shall represent a fixed price labor hour as provided in Section B of this Solicitation. In order to aid the Government in evaluating the reasonableness and risk associated with the Offeror's proposal, the Offeror shall complete the Pricing Tables provided in Section B, in order to be considered for award. The Contractor must offer prices for all labor categories specified in Section B. Offerors may add SUBCLIN numbers to Section B in order to accommodate offeror's specific labor price ranges and/or levels of expertise. Offerors are advised that the Government does not anticipate adding labor categories after award, therefore offeror's must submit complete pricing tables at time of submission of offers. All labor rates will be evaluated for price reasonableness. Price/cost evaluation is described in Section M.
  2. An Independent Estimate shall used for determining price reasonableness. The Offeror's prices provided in Section B shall include all services to be delivered under the contract.

L.21.2 OTHER BUSINESS FACTORS

  1. "Other Business Factors" shall include information that will be used in evaluating the Offeror's proposal and in making the final source selection decision. Information provided in this section includes information pertinent to the financial capability and responsibility of the Offeror, fully executed SF33, Solicitation, Offer and Award (Section A), and the representations and certifications (Section K) made by the Offeror.
    1. Financial Condition and Capability. The Offeror shall discuss its current financial status and plans relative to this contract, including its financial condition and financial capability to conduct a project of the type and magnitude of this contract. Include, as a minimum, the following information for the Prime Contractor and Subcontractors:
      1. Name and location of the company and all its divisions, highlighting the division expected to perform the effort.
      2. Audited annual reports to stockholders for the last three fiscal years.
      3. Projected business ventures through Fiscal Year 2007

    2. Other financial resources available to the company, such as a letter of credit (Prime only).

  2. This information shall be provided at the Corporate level and the lowest level pertinent to the Offeror's financial condition.

L.21.3 SUBCONTRACTING PLAN

The subcontracting plan must be submitted in accordance with FAR Parts 19 and 52, with specific attendtion paid to FAR 19.704 and FAR 52,219-9. The subcontracting plan is subject to negotiations and will be made a part of the contract at time of contact award. Failure to submit and negotiate an acceptable subcontracting plan will make the Offeror ineligible for award.

The Offeror shall show the subcontractor's business size, percentage and type of work estimated to be subcontracted.

All prospective subcontractors contacted by your firm in any manner should be expressly advised in writing that no solicitation on your behlad shall be construed in any manner to be an obligation on your part to enter into a subcontract with said subcontractor. Nor shall any contract result in any claim whatsoever against the United States Government for reimbursement of costs for any efforts expended by said subcontractor, regardless of whether or not your firm is successful in receiving a contract as a result of this proposal.


L.21.4 CONFLICT OF INTEREST AVOIDANCE

In this section of the proposal, the Offeror shall discuss any known potential conflicts with existing efforts being performed under contracts or subcontracts and shall address their plans for ensuring avoidance of conflicts of interest under this contract. Of critical importance is the Offeror's commitment to the performance of the work required under this contract. Thus, Offerors shall provide a brief narrative discussion of how a future conflict would be resolved so as to ensure that there is no interruption in the work performed under the resulting contract.


L.21.5 EXPLANATION OF PRICING

This section of the Offeror's proposal is designed to provide a narrative discussion/explanation of all of the assumptions made in developing the proposal or to explain the rationale for the structure of the price proposal. In the original volume only, the Offeror must include information to support the proposed loaded hourly rates by supplying the following information:


L.22 PAST PERFORMANCE, TECHNICAL AND PRICE PROPOSAL

(VOLUMES I, II AND III) INSTRUCTIONS ON QUANTITIES, PAGE LIMITATIONS AND ELECTRONIC SUBMISSIONS:

  1. Volume I shall be submitted in accordance with the Offeror Past Performance Reference Form and Information Matrix provided in Section J, Attachment 1 and 2. As provided above, the content of Volume I shall not exceed five (5).
  2. The Executive Summary and Key Personnel Resumes of Volume II shall not exceed the page limitations provided for each section, exclusive of cover page. The resumes of key personnel shall be limited to three (3) pages as provided above. All pages, or any other material, in excess of the maximum number of pages stated will not be evaluated. The written technical proposal shall follow the format below. The Government may determine those proposals not following directions as unacceptable and may reject them from further consideration.
  3. In addition to the original, three (3) copies of Volume I, II and III are required. Each proposal volume shall be bound in a separate three-ring binder of minimum size to contain the material. A binder cover sheet shall be affixed to the outer cover of each volume, which clearly identifies each volume (by volume number and name), copy number (i.e., copy 2 of 4), the solicitation number, date of submission, and Offeror's name. This information shall also appear on the edge of the binder to allow for rapid accessibility when placed in a vertical position in a storage cabinet. Tab indexing shall be used to identify all sections within a particular proposal volume. There shall be no writing on the tab index page other than that writing required to identify the particular section.
  4. The price proposal is not subject to page limitations; however, the Offeror shall only include information that is pertinent to matters. Copies of Volume III must be physically separate from other volumes of the proposal. Proposal pages must be numbered. Offerors shall ensure that any spreadsheets and narratives are capable of being extracted by the Government and placed into Microsoft Excel 6.0 and MS Word 9.2 formats, respectively. Each proposal volume shall be bound in a separate three-ring binder of minimum size to contain the material. A binder cover sheet shall be affixed to the outer cover of each volume, which clearly identifies each volume (by volume number and name), copy number (i.e., copy 1 of 3), the solicitation number, date of submission, and Offeror's name. This information shall also appear on the edge of the binder to allow for rapid accessibility when placed in a vertical position in a storage cabinet. Tab indexing shall be used to identify all sections within a particular proposal volume. There shall be no writing on the tab index page other than that writing required to identify the particular section.
  5. The written proposal shall be prepared on standard 8.5 x 11 inch pages. The proposal pages shall be numbered and bound along the left margin. Each page shall have a one-inch margin at the top, the bottom, and on each side. Page numbers, notations of propriety, and any other identifying information printed on each page may be included in the margin.
  6. Text font shall be no smaller than 12 point, however, text included on figures and/or matrices in the written proposal may be reduced to 8 point. Should the Offerors require fold-out pages, one fold-out page shall not exceed either 8.5 inches x 22 inches or 17 inches x 11 inches, which when folded will be no larger than 8.5 inches x 11 inches.

L. 22.1 WRITTEN FORMAT MATRIX OF PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

Proposal Volume Date Due Copies Sections Maximum Pages and Special Instructions
Volume I Technical -

Past Performance and Experience
TBD Original + 3 copies Section: Past Performance and Experience The last day of the period of performance for all projects must be within 3 years of the release date of the RFP.
Volume II Technical

Executive Summary

Key Personnel Resumes
TBD Original + 3 copies Section 1 - Executive Summary


Section 2 - Key Personnel Resumes
Not to exceed 3 pages.
See Section L.20.1.

Not to exceed 3 Pages per resume. See Section L.20.2.
Volume III - Price and Other Business Factors

Price and Other Business Factors
TBD Original +3 copies Tab A: SF33

Tab B: Representations and Certifications (Section K of the RFP)

Tab C: Subcontracting Plan (in accordance with L.21.3)

Tab D: Other Required Business Information as required in Section L.

Tab E: Pricing Information (Section B of the RFP)

Tab F: Pricing Tables from Section B,
Offeror shall include the fully executed representations and certifications (Section K) in the original Volume III. The Offeror shall also include a fully executed SF33 with the Original Volume III.
Volume IV - Oral Presentations TBD Original + 10 See Section L.22.1 There is no page limitations. See Section L.23

L.22.2 ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF PRICE PROPOSAL MATERIAL

  1. Volume III of the Price proposal shall also be submitted on a separate floppy diskette having the following characteristics:
    1. 3.5-inch, Double Sided, High Density (DSHD)
    2. Formatted at 1.44MB (high density)
    3. Readable on an IBM PC-compatible system running Windows 95.

  2. The diskette shall be clearly labeled, and labeled with the following:
    1. Offeror's name
    2. Solicitation number
    3. Date of the submission
    4. Volume III.

  3. If more than one diskette is required for Volume III, the diskettes shall be labeled as Disk "x" of "y" (e.g., Disk 1 of 2).
  4. If there are any discrepancies between the electronic version and the original hardcopy version submitted in response to this solicitation, the original hardcopy version shall take precedence.
  5. Electronic files shall be named in accordance with the following conventions.

L.22.3 ELECTRONIC MATRIX OF PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

Volume/Section Format File Naming Convention
Volume III
Price and Business Factors Price and Other Business Factors v3f4P.wpd (for Price) for Tabs C, D, and E.

v3f4.xls (B Tables, Tab F)(MS Excel format)

Tabs A and B of Volume III need only be submitted in hard copy.


L.23 ORAL PRESENTATION

  1. Following the receipt and evaluation of written proposals, the Government will conduct a competitive range determination. Offerors within the range will be invited to conduct an oral presentation. The Government will determine the order in which Offerors shall provide their oral presentations. Following this selection, the Government will notify Offerors of the scheduled date and time for their oral presentation.
  2. The Government anticipates use of a voluntary "down-select" process for this procurement. The term "down-select" as it is used herein refers to a two-step procurement technique where the number of competitors is reduced in a first step by a preliminary screening and a best value procurement is conducted between the remaining competitors in the second step. In this process, the offers will be evaluated on the written capability information as described in this solicitation and information gathered by the Government through a past performance survey. Prior to oral presentations, based on the Government's evaluation of the written material and past performance information, offerors will be informed that it is unlikely that they will win the competition. The offeror will be given the opportunity to withdraw from the competition to save additional proposal costs and efforts. Those firms who wish to remain in the competition will be allowed to continue to the oral presentation stage of the procurement.
  3. Purpose. The oral presentation is a tool, the sole purpose of which is to enable the evaluators to assess each offer's relative level of familiarity with and understanding of the work that, as Contractor, it would have to perform under the prospective contract. The offeror's representatives must show by their presentation and by answers to the government's questions that they understand the requirements; that they are familiar with the kinds of problems that may develop during performance; and that they are capable of developing practicable and effective solutions to those problems. The offerors will be given a sample task and an equal amount of time to study the task. At the end of the allotted time, the offerors will have an opportunity to explain to the Government evaluators their approach and/or proposed solution to the sample task. The oral presentation will not encompass price or cost discussions or issues.
  4. Schedule. The contracting officer will schedule the oral presentation and notify each offeror of the scheduled date, time and location of its presentation. The Government will provide a minimum of fourteen (14) business days notice to the offeror of the scheduled date and location. The offeror must make its oral presentation in accordance with these instructions and any additional instructions that the contracting officer may provide. The contracting officer may reschedule an offeror's oral presentation at his or her sole discretion.
  5. Participation and Attendance. The offeror's presenters(s) must be chosen from among the offeror's proposed key personnel. The offeror may not use a professional speaker; however, individuals proposed as key personnel to perform on the contract who are consultants and/or employees of a proposed subcontractor may participate. If proposed consultants are used as presenters their resume and a employment or consulting agreement(s) must be submitted as part of the offer. The proposed Program Manager must attend. The offeror may send no more than six (6) representatives to the oral presentation.
  6. Questions. During the presentation the Government's attendees will not interrupt the offeror to ask questions (except to request the repetition of inaudible words or statements or the explanation of terms that are unknown to them) or otherwise engage the offeror in any dialogue. However, the Government will conduct a question and answer session following the presentation during which the offeror's representative must answer questions from the evaluators.

    The Government will not consider the offeror's oral presentation and the question and answer session to be part of the offeror's proposal, as that term is used in the Federal Acquisition Regulation. The Government will not include the offeror's presentation and its answers to questions in any prospective contract. The Government will not permit an offeror to discuss or change its proposal during the oral presentation or the question and answer session. Cost and/or price issues will not be discussed.

  7. Discussions. The oral presentation and the question and answer session will not constitute discussions, as that term is defined and used in FAR subpart 15.6. The Government will not solicit or entertain revisions to the offeror's oral presentation, its response to the sample task or answers to questions.
  8. Topics. During the oral presentation, the offeror must address the following topics:
  9. Sample Task. Following the oral presentation, the offeror will be given the Government's sample task. After the presentation of the sample task, the offeror shall have 30 minutes to prepare a response and concluding the preparation time, the offeror will present the solution of the sample task to the Government. The sample tasks involve the following:

    For Technology Services: The development and testing of the prototype for a continuous, automated system that replaces a multi-step, multi-disciplined system.

    For Assessment, Planning and Analysis: The tracking of technological advances and analysis of user interface for a new technology.

    For Statistical Analysis: The research and development of statistical models that explain specific human behavior in survey data collection.

    For Methodological Research: The investigation and testing of ways to improve response rates and reduce respondent burden in surveys.

    For Sub-Populations Research: The investigation and testing of ways to correctly obtain some demographic information for a selected subpopulation group.

    For Data Analysis and Dissemination: Evaluate the pros and cons of alternative ways of measuring benefits and expenses not in the current poverty measurement, such as medical expenses, work expenses, child care expenses, taxes, and the value of noncash benefits (such as subsidized housing and free school lunches).

L.23.1 Presentation Media. The offeror shall use 8 inch by 11 inch, black and white overhead slides (transparencies) when making its presentation. The offeror may not use any other presentation media. The Government will provide a blank pad of flip chart paper, an overhead projector, screen, and marker pens for the offeror's use during the presentation.

The overhead slides must conform to the following specifications:

  1. Presentation Media. The offeror shall use 8 inch by 11 inch, overhead slides (transparencies) when making its presentation. The offeror may not use any other presentation media. The Government will provide a blank pad of flip chart paper and marker pens for the offeror's use during the question and answer session. Presentation overhead slides shall be delivered within seven (7) days prior to the scheduled oral presentation. Slides will not be accepted the on day of the oral presentation.

    The offeror must submit its overhead slides and 10 sets of 8 inch by 11 inch, landscape orientation, paper copies of its overhead slides, and bind each set in a three-ring loose-leaf binder. In order to ensure the integrity of the source selection process, the offeror must use the overhead slides submitted to the Government with its offer when making its oral presentation, without alteration. The evaluation board may review the copies of the slides prior to the presentation. The offeror may submit no other written documentation for its oral presentation. There is no limit on the number of slides that an offeror may use during its presentation. However, when evaluating the offeror the Government will consider only the information on the overhead transparencies actually used during the presentation and will discard all others.

  2. The oral presentation shall be sufficiently detailed, specific, and complete to enable the Government to thoroughly evaluate the presentation in accordance with Section M, Evaluation Factors for Award.
  3. Oral presentations will be targeted toward the technical complexities associated with this requirement. Accordingly, the key personnel identified in the offeror's proposal will be required to address the questions posed by the Government. Offeror attendees will be limited to those key personnel identified in their proposal. There will be no requirement for any written or slide presentations during the oral presentations. Accordingly, the Government will not accept any written or other materials (e.g., marketing or corporate brochures, proposal amendments, etc.) for evaluation during oral presentations or the question and answer session.

L.24 ORAL PRESENTATION FORMAT

  1. The format for the oral presentations will be as follows:

    Presentation 1 hour
    Question & Answers 20 mins.
    Break 20 mins.
    Sample Task presentation 20 mins.
    Offeror Preparation of sample task 30 mins.
    Offeror Presentation of sample task 30 mins.

  2. The oral presentation shall commence with an introduction by name, position, company affiliation, and area of expertise for each key personnel. Introductions will count towards the time limit. The Government will monitor the allotted time, announcing the start and end of the presentation periods. The Government will not interrupt the Offeror to ask questions (except clarification of terms or misheard words) or otherwise engage the Offeror in any dialogue.

    The contracting officer will tell the Offeror when to start its presentation, keep time and stop the presentation at the end of the 60 minute time period whether or not the Offeror is finished. The Offeror will be given the sample task at the end of its oral presentation.

  3. During the Oral Presentations the Government will enter into a question and answer period with the Offeror following completion of its oral presentation. This period will also allow the Government to clarify and discuss information provided in the oral presentation.

L.25 ORAL PRESENTATION LOGISTICS

L.25.1 LOCATION

Oral presentations shall be conducted at the U.S. Census Bureau in Suitland, MD. The oral presentation shall begin at 9:00 a.m. and end at approximately 12:00 noon, unless the Offeror is otherwise notified.


L.25.2 AUTHORIZED PRESENTERS

  1. Only Key Personnel shall participate in the one hour oral presentation. The Contracting Officer may allow substitute personnel under dire circumstances but this may affect the Offeror's technical evaluation. Teleconferencing is not allowed. Non Key Personnel may attend the oral presentation, participate in the question and answer session, and participate in the preparation of the solution to the sample task. Only Key Personnel shall present the proposed solution to the task.
  2. There shall be no entry and exit allowed from the oral presentation facility once the first presentation begins, with the exception of Government-determined break periods.
  3. It is at the discretion of the Offeror as to which presentation personnel present a particular segment. There is no limit on the number of presenters within a segment, although there will be no additional time provided for introductions and/or set-up modifications.

L.25.3 RECORD OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

The Government will audiotape the oral presentation for its records and will not provide a copy of the tape to the offeror.

Offerors will not be allowed to videotape or audiotape the oral presentation.


L.26 DISCUSSIONS

  1. The Government reserves the right to award without conducting discussions.
  2. If discussions are necessary, this discussion period will allow the Government to clarify and discuss information provided in the written proposals and oral presentation, address any weaknesses and deficiencies, and gain additional information concerning the Offeror's proposal, as required. Although the Offeror may have additional personnel in attendance at the discussion period, the key personnel participating in the oral presentation shall attend these discussions.
  3. The Government reserves the right to call for discussions, proposal clarifications, and or revisions at any time as may be determined to be in the Government's best interest and in accordance with the FAR.

L.27 TELEGRAPHIC OFFERS

Telegraphic (including mailgrams) offers, proposals are not authorized for this solicitation.


SECTION M: EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD


Source evaluation will be conducted and selection will be made in accordance with the guidelines provided in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).


M.1 BASIS FOR AWARD

The Bureau of the Census (BOC) source evaluation will be based on best value principles. Accordingly, award will be made to the responsible and technically acceptable Offeror whose proposal provides the greatest overall value to the Government, price and other factors considered. This will be determined by comparing the value of the differences in the technical skills of competing offers based on their strengths, weaknesses, and risks with differences of their price to the Government. In making this comparison, the Government is more concerned with obtaining superior technical skills than with making an award at the lowest overall cost to the Government. However, the Government will not make an award at a significantly higher overall price to the Government to achieve slightly superior technical skills.


M.2 GENERAL SELECTION AND AWARD CONDITIONS

M.2.1 SOURCE SELECTION PROCEDURES

  1. Formal source selection procedures encompass the use of a structured process that involves a source selection organization responsible for the evaluation of the proposals and selection of a source for contract award. The source selection organization consists of a team of Government representatives with the technical expertise required to evaluate and make contract award.
  2. The source selection organization will be responsible for evaluating and selecting the successful Offerors for this requirement. Select members of the team will be responsible for evaluating the technical merits of Volumes I, II, and the oral presentations(Volume IV) and other members will be responsible for evaluating the merits of Volume III, Price and Other Business Factors. After initial and any subsequent evaluations, the source selection organization will conduct a final assessment of the Offerors' proposals. The source selection organization will arrive at a consensus on which offeror's proposal represents the best value for the Government.

M.2.2 STREAMLINING

M.2.2.1 DISCUSSIONS

The Government intends to award contracts based on initial offers received without discussion of such offers. Accordingly, it is strongly suggested that each initial offer should be submitted on the most favorable price and technical terms that the offeror can submit to the Government. The Government does reserve the right to conduct discussions with the Offerors. The discussions may include all aspects of the proposal. At any point in the evaluation process the Government may communicate with Offerors.

M.2.2.2 OFFEROR ATTENDANCE AT DISCUSSIONS

Attendance of Offeror personnel and subcontractors at discussions will be limited to those individuals required for the accomplishment of the objectives of the discussions. Therefore, Offerors shall take into consideration BOC streamlining efforts when preparing their proposals to ensure the availability of personnel assigned to the preparation and subsequent negotiation of proposals. Because the BOC will rely on the information provided at these discussions, it is imperative that at least one of the individuals participating be an authorized officer of the firm possessing the authority to commit the firm and its resources.

M.2.2.3 OTHER INFORMATION MADE AVAILABLE FOR EVALUATION

In conducting the evaluation of the proposals, the BOC reserves the right to utilize all information available at the time of evaluations. The BOC may rely on information contained in its own records (such as Government audit agencies), information made available through reference checks, information available through commercial sources (such as Dun and Bradstreet Reports) and information publicly available (such as articles contained in periodicals).


M.2.3 SITE VISITS

The Government reserves the right to visit or contact other customer sites that the Offeror is currently supporting, or previous customers who have obtained similar services prior to award of the contract. Site visits may be required to verify information provided in Offerors' proposals. Site visits, if conducted, will be taken into consideration as part of the evaluation factors set forth below. The BOC will use information obtained during site visits (if any) to validate information contained in Offeror proposals.


M.3 METHOD OF EVALUATION

  1. Proposals will be evaluated against the requirements of the solicitation and in accordance with the evaluation factors set forth below to determine the Offeror's demonstrated ability to perform the services required. General statements such as "the vast resources of our nationwide company will be used to perform the services required by the Statement of Work" are not sufficient. The Offeror shall clearly address each element of the proposal as required by Section L of this solicitation. Any proposal failing to address all of the elements of Section C may be considered indicative of the Offeror's lack of understanding in response to the Government's requirements and may be considered unacceptable.
  2. The evaluation will be conducted using the evaluation factors set forth below. In the evaluation we will use the Offeror's written proposals, oral presentation, questions and answers, discussions, and any other information as stated in M.2.3.
  3. The Government reserves the right to determine the specific order and duration of individual activities as the evaluation proceeds, and may call for discussions, proposal clarifications, and revisions at any time as may be determined to be in the Government's best interests and in accordance with the FAR.

M.3.1 EVALUATION FACTORS

  1. Proposals will be evaluated in relation to the evaluation factors. The proposal evaluation factors are categorized as technical or business evaluation factors, and are listed below.

    Technical Evaluation Factors:

    Factor 1: Past Performance and Experience

    Factor 2: Key Personnel

    Factor 3: Understanding of the Governments' Requirements,
    Nature of the Work, and Sample Task

    Factor 4: Project Management Plan

    Business Evaluation Factors:

    Factor 4: Price and Other Business Factors

  2. Past Performance and Experience; Key Personnel; Understanding of the Governments' Requirements, Nature of the Work, and Sample Task; and Project Management Plan factors are referred to as the Technical Factors. Price and Other Business Factors, referred to as the Business Factors, are factors that will be evaluated separately and applied in the determination of best value.

  3. The technical evaluation will be attained through a determination and analysis of strengths, weaknesses, and risks of each proposal. Technical risk will be included in the final evaluation of each factor and will not be evaluated as a separate factor. In the assessment of technical risk, the Government evaluators will also consider other available information.


M.3.2 RELATIVE ORDER OF IMPORTANCE OF TECHNICAL FACTORS

The Technical Evaluation Factors, in their relative order of importance, are:

Relative Order of Importance Factor Importance
1 Factor 1: Past Performance and Experience The Past Performance and Experience factor is the most important technical evaluation factor.
2 Factor 2: Key Personnel Key Personnel factor is less important than Past Performance and Experience.
3 Factor 3: Understanding of the Governments's Requirements, Nature of the Work, and Sample Task The Understanding of the Governments' Requirements factor is less important Key Personnel.
4 Factor 4: Project Management Plan The Project Management Plan factor is less important than the Understanding of Govenments' requirements factor.


M.3.3 BUSINESS EVALUATION FACTORS

The Business Evaluation Factor is less important than the Technical Evaluation Factors. The Business Evaluation Factors are not weighted. The degree of importance of price will increase with the degree of equality of the proposals in relation to the other factors on which selection will be based.


M.3.4 FACTOR 1 - PAST PERFORMANCE AND EXPERIENCE FACTOR

  1. Given the critical need to guard against poor contract performance, the Past Performance and Experience evaluation factor is the most important factor and will assess the relevance and breadth of the Offeror's experience and the quality of the Offeror's past performance on contracts consistent in scope and complexity with the R&D 2007 requirement. The Government is seeking to determine whether:
    1. The Offeror has experience that will enhance its technical and managerial capability to perform, and
    2. The Offeror consistently delivers quality services in a timely manner.

  2. The quality of the Offeror's past performance will be evaluated on the basis of information contained in the Offeror's proposal and the information that the Government obtains through reference checks or other means. The past performance information may include the Offeror's record of providing high quality services in a timely manner; conforming to specifications and the standards of good workmanship; adhering to contract schedules, including the administrative aspects of contract performance; overall personnel quality, availability, and stability; reasonable and cooperative behavior; commitment to and business-like concern for the interests of the customer; overall program management approach, quality, and capability; record of awards or performance recognition earned; and overall client satisfaction. If the Offeror and subcontractor(s) has no single experience that encompasses all types of past performance and experience defined under this factor, then the Offeror may show past performance and experience through a combination of projects which together show that work has been accomplished that is consistent in scope and complexity with the R&D 2007 requirement.
  3. The evaluation of this factor will provide an indication of the Offeror's ability to hire staff and manage technical personnel assigned to operations similar in function, scope and complexity to the R&D 2007 requirements, and will indicate the likelihood of the Offeror's success.

M.3.5 FACTOR 2 - KEY PERSONNEL

This factor will be evaluated on the basis of the Key Personnel defined by the BOC in Section H.6, and additional key personnel the Offeror proposes to make available to the R&D2007 project, as stated in its written proposal and oral presentation. The Key Personnel should have relevant experience in performing the tasks required of this solicitation in other projects that are similar in function, scope, and complexity to the R&D2007 requirements. The key personnel will be evaluated for the breadth, depth, and quality of relevant experience, results and effectiveness of their work in achieving goals in performance of projects of similar size and complexity to the R&D2007 requirement.


M.3.6 FACTOR 3 - UNDERSTANDING OF THE GOVERNMENT'S REQUIREMENTS, NATURE OF WORK, AND SAMPLE TASK

The Government will evaluate the offerors' understanding of the Government's requirements, its understanding of the nature of the work to be performed under the prospective contract(s) and its solution to the sample task.


M.3.7 FACTOR 4 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN

The Government will evaluate the offerors' methods for staffing, managing personnel, subcontracting plans, and project management plans, including, but not limited to, managing priorities, task monitoring, and decision making processes.


M.4. BUSINESS EVALUATION

The business evaluation will assess price and other business factors as deemed appropriate by the BOC.


M.4.1 PRICE EVALUATION

Under the price factor, the price proposal will be evaluated to determine, among other things, price analysis, price reasonableness, and any risks attributable to composition of the prices proposed.

M.4.1.1 PRICE ANALYSIS

FAR 15.404 prescribes the use of one or more of the following techniques to perform price analysis:

  1. Comparison of proposed prices received in response to the solicitation.
  2. Comparison of prior proposed prices and contract prices with current proposed prices received for the same or similar end items.
  3. Comparison with competitive published price lists, published market prices of commodities, similar indexes, and discount or rebate arrangements.
  4. Comparison of proposed prices with Independent Cost Estimates.
  5. Comparison of proposed prices with prices for the same or similar items obtained through market research.

M.4.1.2 PRICE REASONABLENESS

Each proposal will be evaluated to determine whether the Government considers the proposed prices to be reasonable. The Government will evaluate prices of all labor categories proposed.

To accomplish this, the Government may employ one of the following:


M.4.1.3 TOTAL EVALUATED PRICE

For price evaluation purposes only the Government will assume that it will purchase 100 hours of each skill category for each area purposed for all five (5) potential contract years including the Project Director and Task Manager. The yearly totals will be added together to get a total contract evaluated cost. These assumptions in no way bind the Government to exercise any option during the life of the contract and/or order any amount of services during the life of the contract.

Hourly rates will be multiplied by the total hours. This amount will be added for all categories and totaled by year. All yearly totals will added for a total evaluated contract price.


M.5 RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO PRICE

  1. Risks attributable to price are defined as any aspect of an Offeror's proposal that could result in adverse performance under the contract as a result of the prices proposed by the Offeror. Each proposal will be assessed to identify risks attributable to the prices proposed. Where price risk is assessed, it may be described in quantitative terms or used as a best value discriminator.
  2. The Government will reject as non-responsive any proposal that is materially unbalanced in terms of prices for basic and option-year quantities. An unbalanced proposal is one that incorporates prices significantly less than cost for some items and/or prices that are significantly overstated for other items.

M.6 OTHER BUSINESS FACTORS

The information contained in each Offeror's Price and Other Business Factors Proposal will be used to determine each Offeror's responsibility, in accordance with FAR Part 9, and business capability to perform. The evaluation of Other Business Factors is critical to the determination of responsibility; consequently, they will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis. The information requested by Section L of this RFP, together with information that may be available from Government agencies and from non-Government organizations will be considered in the evaluation of Other Business factors. The following will be part of the evaluation:

  1. Financial Condition and Capability. The Offeror's current financial status and other business information will be evaluated to determine if the Offeror has the necessary tenacity, capacity, capability, and credit to successfully perform this contract.

M.7 ORAL PRESENTATION

The oral presentation will be used as part of the evaluation of all those firms determined to be within the competitive range. The Government may use the information and insights gained from the Offeror's presentation and responses to questions concerning the oral presentation to reassess the Offeror's strengths, weaknesses, and risks associated with all evaluation factors. The oral presentation may result in a higher or lower overall evaluation of the Offeror's technical factors.

__________________________

1. * identifies Key Personnel


Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Acquisition Division

Last revised: October 15, 2012