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2020 Post-Enumeration Survey (PES) Results for the 50 states and District of Columbia to be released May 19. Learn more.

Fighting Census Rumors

Use this page to learn about how the U.S. Census Bureau's Trust & Safety Team protected the 2020 Census count by reporting inaccurate, suspicious, and fraudulent information circulating online.

Setting the Record Straight

Can my answers be shared with CDC or local health officials?

No. The law prevents the Census Bureau from sharing your information with any local, state, or federal health officials. Your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency in any way. Your answers are used only to create statistics about our country. The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the U.S. Code to protect your personal information—every answer, to every question—and keep it strictly confidential.

Did the 2020 Census ask about citizenship status?

No. The 2020 Census did not ask whether you or anyone in your home is a U.S. citizen.

Were noncitizens counted in the census?

Yes. The 2020 Census counted everyone living in the country, including noncitizens.

Can my answers be shared with law enforcement or used against me?

No. The law prevents the Census Bureau from sharing your information with law enforcement or immigration enforcement. Your answers do not affect your eligibility for government benefits—and they cannot be used against you by any government agency or court in any way. Your answers are used only to create statistics about our country. The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the U.S. Code to protect your personal information—every answer, to every question—and keep it strictly confidential.

What information is shared with the public?

After the Census Bureau finishes processing responses to the 2020 Census, we release anonymous population and demographic data for communities, states, and the country as a whole.

Will my answers affect my eligibility for government benefits?

No. Your answers do not affect your eligibility for any government benefits. Similarly, your census responses do not affect your eligibility to vote. The answers you provide are used only to produce statistics.

Checking the Facts

Census workers occasionally call homes to ask follow-up questions about responses to the 2020 Census and other household surveys.

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An individual’s response to the 2020 Census race question is a matter of self-identification.

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A false report alleged that Census Bureau records were breached.

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Your answers do not affect your eligibility for any government benefits, including stimulus packages.

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Noncitizens may have been hired in certain circumstances.

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A false rumor circulated that individuals posing as workers for "Department of Home Affairs" went door to door to check IDs claiming it was for the 2020 Census.

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The 2020 Census online form worked on any computer, tablet, or smartphone that could access the internet.

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Reporting a Rumor

Have you read or heard something about the 2020 Census or a Census Bureau survey that is confusing? Let the Census Bureau know by contacting rumors@census.gov.

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