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Frequently Asked Questions

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What will the size of the U.S. population be in 2060?

In 2060, the country is expected to have a population of 404 million people, growing by about 78 million people compared with its population in 2017.

Source: Projected Population Size and Births, Deaths, and Migration: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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When will the U.S. population reach 400 million people?

The population is projected to cross the 400-million mark in 2058.

Source: Projected Population Size and Births, Deaths, and Migration: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.  

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How fast will the U.S. population grow?

The population is projected to grow by an average of 1.8 million per year between 2017 and 2060. However, the pace of population growth is slowing. Between 2017 and 2030, the population is projected to grow by an average of 2.3 million people per year. In the following decade, that rate is expected to fall to 1.8 million per year. It is expected to continue falling to an average of 1.5 million per year between 2040 and 2060.

Source: Projected Population Size and Births, Deaths, and Migration: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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How will the racial and ethnic composition of the United States change?

The United States is projected to become more racially and ethnically pluralistic in coming decades. The non-Hispanic White population is projected to shrink from 199 million in 2020 to 179 million in 2060, primarily because of falling birth rates and a rising number of deaths as the non-Hispanic White population ages. Furthermore, the population of people who are Two or More Races is projected to be the fastest growing, followed by Asians and Hispanics. By 2060, the non-Hispanic White population is still projected to remain the largest single race or ethnic group in the United States.

Source: Projected Race and Hispanic Origin: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

Race and Hispanic Origin by Selected Age Groups: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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When are less than half of children projected to be non-Hispanic White alone?

In 2020, less than half of children under 18 in the United States are projected to be non-Hispanic White alone (49.8 percent of the projected total number of 73.9 million children) – that is, the population of single-race children who are White and are not of Hispanic origin. In comparison, in 2020 about 72 percent of children are projected to be White alone, regardless of Hispanic origin.

Source: Race and Hispanic Origin by Selected Age Groups: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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Is the foreign-born population projected to increase?

The nation’s foreign-born population is projected to rise from 44 million people today to 69 million in 2060, growing from about 14 percent to 17 percent of the total population. Although the foreign-born population is currently growing at a faster pace than the native-born population, that pace of growth is projected to slow in coming decades. The previous historic high was in 1890, when 14.8 percent of the population was foreign-born.

Source: Projected Size of the Native and Foreign-Born Population: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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What will the size of the older population be in coming decades?

The nation’s 65-and-older population is projected to nearly double in size in coming decades, from 49 million people in 2017 to 95 million in 2060. As a result, nearly 1 in 4 Americans is projected to be 65 years and over by 2060. Beginning in 2035, older adults are expected to outnumber children for the first time in U.S. history.

Source: Projected Age and Sex Composition of the Population: Main Projections Series for the United States, 2017-2060. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division: Washington, DC.

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