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The glossary below may define terms not included in the main Glossary on census.gov.

In this Section:

  1. 2017 NAICS code
  2. 2017 NAPCS collection code
  3. Advertising and promotional services ($1,000)
  4. All other operating expenses ($1,000)
  5. Annual payroll ($1,000)
  6. Average cost inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)
  7. Capital expenditures (except land and mineral rights) ($1,000)
  8. Capital expenditures for all other machinery and equipment ($1,000)
  9. Capital expenditures for automobiles, trucks, etc. for highway use ($1,000)
  10. Capital expenditures for buildings and other structures ($1,000)
  11. Capital expenditures for computers and peripheral data processing equipment ($1,000)
  12. Capital expenditures for machinery and equipment ($1,000)
  13. Capital expenditures for mineral exploration and development ($1,000)
  14. Capital expenditures for mineral land and rights ($1,000)
  15. Capital expenditures for new construction ($1,000)
  16. Capital expenditures for new construction for work done by own employees ($1,000)
  17. Commissions received for sales made on the account of others ($1,000)
  18. Commissions received for sales made on the account of others as percent of sales on the account of others (%)
  19. Communication services ($1,000)
  20. Construction workers annual wages ($1,000)
  21. Construction workers for pay period including December 12
  22. Construction workers for pay period including June 12
  23. Construction workers for pay period including March 12
  24. Construction workers for pay period including September 12
  25. Construction, production and/or development and exploration workers annual hours (1,000)
  26. Consumption Quantity
  27. Cost of all other fuels and lubricants ($1,000)
  28. Cost of construction work subcontracted out to others ($1,000)
  29. Cost of contract work ($1,000)
  30. Cost of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  31. Cost of goods sold ($1,000)
  32. Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed ($1,000)
  33. Cost of natural gas and manufactured gas ($1,000)
  34. Cost of off-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  35. Cost of on-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  36. Cost of purchased electricity ($1,000)
  37. Cost of purchased electricity for resale ($1,000)
  38. Cost of purchased fuels consumed ($1,000)
  39. Cost of purchased land ($1,000)
  40. Cost of purchased natural gas for resale ($1,000)
  41. Cost of purchased transportation ($1,000)
  42. Cost of resales ($1,000)
  43. Crude oil storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)
  44. Current operating expenses for exploration, development, and mineral land and rights ($1,000)
  45. Current operating expenses for royalty payments ($1,000)
  46. Data processing and other purchased computer services ($1,000)
  47. Delivered cost ($1,000)
  48. Distribution of sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  49. Employer's cost for defined benefit pension plans ($1,000)
  50. Employer's cost for defined contribution plans ($1,000)
  51. Employer's cost for health insurance ($1,000)
  52. Employers cost for legally required fringe benefits ($1,000)
  53. Employer's cost for other fringe benefits ($1,000)
  54. Employers cost for voluntarily provided fringe benefits ($1,000)
  55. Expensed computer hardware and other equipment ($1,000)
  56. Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and rights ($1,000)
  57. Expensed purchases of software ($1,000)
  58. Expenses for maintenance and repair ($1,000)
  59. Expenses for maintenance and repair for work done by own employees ($1,000)
  60. Finished goods or minerals products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)
  61. Finished goods or minerals products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids inventories, end of year ($1,000)
  62. First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)
  63. First-quarter payroll ($1,000)
  64. Gross margin ($1,000)
  65. Gross margin as percent of sales on own account (%)
  66. Gross profit ($1,000)
  67. Gross profit as percent of sales (%)
  68. Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), beginning of year ($1,000)
  69. Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), end of year ($1,000)
  70. Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (%)
  71. Industry contribution to total NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  72. Last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventory valuation, beginning of year ($1,000)
  73. Last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)
  74. Lease Rents ($1,000)
  75. LIFO net value, beginning of year ($1,000)
  76. LIFO net value, end of year ($1,000)
  77. LIFO reserve, beginning of year ($1,000)
  78. LIFO reserve, end of year ($1,000)
  79. Liquefied petroleum gas storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)
  80. Materials and/or supplies, parts, fuels, etc. inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)
  81. Materials and/or supplies, parts, fuels, etc. inventories, end of year ($1,000)
  82. Meaning of class of customer code
  83. Meaning of employment size of establishments code
  84. Meaning of employment size of firms code
  85. Meaning of enterprise support industry served code
  86. Meaning of exported services status indicator
  87. Meaning of firm concentration code
  88. Meaning of franchise status code
  89. Meaning of kind-of-business construction code
  90. Meaning of legal form of organization code
  91. Meaning of location of construction work by state code
  92. Meaning of sales, value of shipments, or revenue size of establishments code
  93. Meaning of sales, value of shipments, or revenue size of firms code
  94. Meaning of single unit/multiunit firm code
  95. Meaning of tax status code
  96. Meaning of type of operation code
  97. NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue as % of industry sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  98. NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue as % of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments with the NAPCS collection code (%)
  99. Net value of construction work ($1,000)
  100. Non-LIFO costing, beginning of year ($1,000)
  101. Non-LIFO costing, end of year ($1,000)
  102. Number of employees
  103. Number of establishments
  104. Number of establishments by primary method of receiving bulk liquid products
  105. Number of establishments in business at end of year
  106. Number of establishments with NAPCS collection code as % of industry establishments (%)
  107. Number of firms
  108. Operating expenses ($1,000)
  109. Other employees annual wages ($1,000)
  110. Other employees for pay period including December 12
  111. Other employees for pay period including June 12
  112. Other employees for pay period including March 12
  113. Other employees for pay period including September 12
  114. Other non-LIFO inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)
  115. Production and/or development and exploration workers annual wages ($1,000)
  116. Production and/or development and exploration workers for pay period including March 12
  117. Production workers for pay period including December 12
  118. Production workers for pay period including June 12
  119. Production workers for pay period including September 12
  120. Purchased professional and technical services ($1,000)
  121. Purchases ($1,000)
  122. Quantity of electricity purchased for heat and power (1,000 kWh)
  123. Quantity of electricity sold or transferred (1,000 kWh)
  124. Quantity of generated electricity (1,000 kWh)
  125. Quantity produced for the NAPCS collection code
  126. Quantity shipped for the NAPCS collection code
  127. Range indicating percent of total annual payroll imputed
  128. Range indicating percent of total employees imputed
  129. Range indicating percent of total NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue imputed
  130. Range indicating percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue imputed
  131. Refined petroleum products storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)
  132. Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services ($1,000)
  133. Relative standard error of NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  134. Rental payments or lease payments for buildings and other structures ($1,000)
  135. Rental payments or lease payments for machinery and equipment ($1,000)
  136. Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery ($1,000)
  137. Response coverage of class of customer inquiry (%)
  138. Response coverage of construction activity capital expenditures inquiry (%)
  139. Response coverage of construction activity expenses for maintenance and repair inquiry (%)
  140. Response coverage of cost of purchased electricity inquiry (%)
  141. Response coverage of cost of purchased natural gas inquiry (%)
  142. Response coverage of cost of purchased transportation inquiry (%)
  143. Response coverage of employment by function inquiry (%)
  144. Response coverage of exported energy inquiry (%)
  145. Response coverage of exported services employment (%)
  146. Response coverage of exported services sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  147. Response coverage of franchise inquiry (%)
  148. Response coverage of inventories by valuation method inquiry (%)
  149. Response coverage of inventories inquiry (%)
  150. Response coverage of primary method of receiving bulk liquid products inquiry (%)
  151. Response coverage of total under-roof floor space inquiry (%)
  152. Response coverage of under-roof selling space inquiry (%)
  153. Revenue from exports ($1,000)
  154. Revenue from the sale of electricity purchased for resale ($1,000)
  155. Revenue from the sale of natural gas purchased for resale ($1,000)
  156. Sales made on the account of others ($1,000)
  157. Sales made on the account of others as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  158. Sales on own account ($1,000)
  159. Sales, value of shipments, or revenue ($1,000)
  160. Sales, value of shipments, or revenue from exported services ($1,000)
  161. Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of largest firms as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)
  162. Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of NAPCS collection code ($1,000)
  163. Sales, value of shipments, or revenue per square foot of under-roof selling space (dollars)
  164. Standard cost inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)
  165. Taxes and license fees ($1,000)
  166. Temporary staff and leased employee expenses ($1,000)
  167. Total all other operating expenses ($1,000)
  168. Total capital expenditures for buildings, structures, machinery, and equipment (new and used) ($1,000)
  169. Total cost of selected power, fuels, and lubricants ($1,000)
  170. Total cost of supplies and/or materials ($1,000)
  171. Total depreciation during year ($1,000)
  172. Total fringe benefits ($1,000)
  173. Total inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)
  174. Total inventories, end of year ($1,000)
  175. Total other operating expenses ($1,000)
  176. Total rental payments or lease payments ($1,000)
  177. Total retirements ($1,000)
  178. Total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments with the NAPCS collection code ($1,000)
  179. Total selected costs ($1,000)
  180. Total storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)
  181. Total storage capacity, December 31, excluding liquified petroleum gas (1,000 gallons)
  182. Total under-roof floor space (1,000 square feet)
  183. Under-roof selling space (1,000 square feet)
  184. Under-roof selling space as percent of total under-roof floor space (%)
  185. Unit of measurement for the NAPCS collection code
  186. Value added ($1,000)
  187. Value of construction work ($1,000)
  188. Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000)
  189. Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000)
  190. Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000)
  191. Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000)
  192. Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000)
  193. Value of other business done ($1,000)
  194. Work-in-process inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)
  195. Work-in-process inventories, end of year ($1,000)
  196. Year

2017 NAICS code

The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) was developed by representatives from the United States, Canada, and Mexico and replaces each country's separate classification system with one uniform system for classifying industries. In the United States, NAICS replaces the Standard Industrial Classification, a system that Federal, State, and local governments, the business community, and the general public have used since the 1930s. This industry classification system enables North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners--the United States, Canada, and Mexico--to better compare economic and financial statistics and ensure that such statistics keep pace with the changing economy.  For more information on NAICS, see Economic Census: NAICS Codes.

2017 NAPCS collection code

The North American Product Classification System (NAPCS) collection codes represent various types of products produced or carried, or services rendered, by an establishment. NAPCS collection codes ending in "000" represent broad products and codes ending in digits other than "000" represent detailed products.  For more information on NAPCS, see Economic Census: NAPCS Codes.

Advertising and promotional services ($1,000)

All other operating expenses ($1,000)

General Definition

The total other operating expenses is the sum of all other operating expenses for a firm that is not previously identified.  Includes temporary staff and leased employee expenses, expensed computer hardware and other equipment, expensed purchases of software, data processing and other purchased computer services, communication services, repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery, refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services, advertising and promotional services, purchased professional and technical services, taxes and license fees, and any other operating expenses not identified.

The total other operating expenses are comprised of eleven operating expense types that were collected for the Construction, Manufacturing, and Mining Industries:

1.     Temporary staff and leased employee expenses ($1,000)

2.     Expensed computer hardware and other equipment ($1,000)

3.     Expensed purchases of software ($1,000)

4.     Data processing and other purchased computer services ($1,000)

5.     Communication services ($1,000)

6.     Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery ($1,000)

7.     Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services ($1,000)

8.     Advertising and promotional services ($1,000)

9.     Purchased professional and technical services ($1,000)

10.  Taxes and license fees ($1,000)

11.  All other operating expenses ($1,000)

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

These eleven types of other operating expenses are defined as:

·         Temporary staff and leased employee expenses - Professional Employer Organizations and staffing agencies for personnel. Includes all temporary staff and leased employee charges for payroll, benefits, and services.

·         Expensed computer hardware and other equipment - Expensed computer hardware and other equipment. Includes copiers, fax machines, telephones, shop and lab equipment, CPUs, and monitors. Excludes packaged software or leased and rented equipment.

·         Expensed purchases of software - Purchases of prepackaged, custom-coded, or vendor-customized software. Includes software developed or customized by others, web-design services and purchases, licensing agreements, upgrades of software, and maintenance fees related to software upgrades and alterations.

·         Data processing and other purchased computer services - Computer facilities management services, computer input preparation, data storage, computer time rental, optical scanning services, and other computer-related advice and services, including training.  Excludes services provided by other establishments within that firm (such as a separate central data processing unit).

·         Communication services - Telephone, cellular, and fax services, computer-related communications (e.g., Internet, connectivity, online), credit card transaction fees, expensed integrated systems, and other wired and wireless communication services.

·         Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery - Purchased repairs and maintenance to buildings and/or machinery and equipment. Includes repairs for painting, roof repairs, replacing parts, over-hauling of equipment, and other repairs chargeable as current operating costs. Cost of repair and maintenance of any leased property if the establishment assumed the cost.  Excludes extensive "repairs" or reconstruction that is capitalized.

·         Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services - Water, sewer, refuse removal, and other non-electric utility payments. Includes cost of hazardous waste removal or treatment. Excludes cost of refuse removal services if included in rental payments; machinery or equipment reported as a capital expenditures; and cost of salaries paid to employees of the establishment whose work involves refuse removal and/or hazardous waste removal or treatment.

·         Advertising and promotional services - Purchased advertising and promotional services.  Includes marketing and public relations services.  Excludes salaries paid to employees of the establishment for advertising work.

·         Purchased professional and technical services – Operating expenses for management consulting, accounting, auditing, bookkeeping, legal, actuarial, payroll processing, architectural, engineering, and/or other professional services (i.e. janitorial, security, or landscape services).  Excludes salaries paid to employees of owned establishment for these services.

·         Taxes and license fees - Governmental taxes and licensing fees. Payments to government agencies for taxes and licenses. Includes business and property taxes. Excludes income taxes.

·         All other operating expenses - All other operating expenses not reported elsewhere. Excludes purchases of merchandise for resale and non-operating expenses.

Annual payroll ($1,000)

General Definition

This definition of payroll is the same as that used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Forms 941 or 944 as taxable Medicare Wages and Tips (even if not subject to income or FICA tax).  If an employee works at more than one location, the payroll is included in the one location where they spend most of their time.

Payroll includes all forms of compensation paid during the reporting year to all employees, such as salaries, wages, tips and gratuities, commissions, bonuses, vacation allowances, sick leave pay, dismissal pay, the spread on stock options that is taxable to employees as income (except for the manufacturing and mining industries who include this in fringe benefits), and employee contributions to qualified pension plans. For corporations, payroll includes amounts paid to officers and executives.

Excluded from payroll are employer’s costs for fringe benefits such as payroll taxes, employer-paid insurance premiums, pension plans, and other employer-paid benefits.  For unincorporated businesses, payroll does not include profit or other compensation of proprietors or partners. It does not include payrolls of leased departments nor annuities or supplemental unemployment compensation benefits, even if income tax was withheld.  Payroll is reported before deductions for social security, income tax, insurance, union dues, etc.

Note: For employment and related fields (payroll, production hours, benefits), respondents were asked to report only those full- and part-time employees whose payroll was reported on the IRS Forms 941 or 944 filing for the Employer Identification Number (EIN) used by that establishment. Other temporary workers and workers whose payroll was reported under a different firm's EIN were reported elsewhere. Comparisons of census-year data and data for earlier years should be used with caution.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services; Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation; Educational Services; Health Care and Social Assistance; Information; Management of Companies and Enterprises; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services; and Other Services (Except Public Administration)

Included are salaries of members of professional service organizations or associations which operate under state professional corporation statutes and file a corporate federal income tax return.

Finance and Insurance and Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Sectors

Included is compensation paid to sales agents (e.g., independent insurance or real estate agents) as reported on IRS Forms 941 or 944; exclude if reported on IRS Form 1099-MISC- Statement for Recipients of Miscellaneous Income.

Excluded are commissions paid to independent (nonemployee) agents, such as insurance or real estate agents.

Manufacturing Sector

Excluded are payments to members of Armed Forces and pensioners carried on the active payrolls of manufacturing establishments.

Mining Sector       

Included are payments received on a ton, car, or yard basis.

Excluded are payments to members of Armed Forces and pensioners carried on the active payroll of mining establishments. Also excluded are royalty payments to unions and costs of smithing, explosives, fuses, electric cap lamps, and mine supplies used in production, development, and exploration work but charged to employees and deducted from their wages.

Wholesale Trade Sector

Included is compensation paid to sales agents and/or brokers as reported on IRS Forms 941 or 944; exclude if reported on IRS Form 1099-MISC, Statement for Recipients of Miscellaneous Income.

Excluded are commissions paid to independent (nonemployee) agents and/or brokers.

Average cost inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

Value of inventories using the average cost valuation method on December 31st of the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

See description in Total inventories, end of year ($1,000)

Capital expenditures (except land and mineral rights) ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for all other machinery and equipment ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for automobiles, trucks, etc. for highway use ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for buildings and other structures ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for computers and peripheral data processing equipment ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for machinery and equipment ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for mineral exploration and development ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for mineral land and rights ($1,000)

Capital expenditures for new construction ($1,000)

Value of capital expenditures reported by establishments for new construction or renovation. Labor and materials are included in this value, but land and the value of production machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure are not included. 

Capital expenditures for new construction for work done by own employees ($1,000)

 

Value of capital expenditures reported by establishments for new construction or renovation that represents work done by their own employees, as opposed to work done by contractors or other hired labor.

Commissions received for sales made on the account of others ($1,000)

Total commissions, selling, and listing fees received by agents and brokers acting on behalf of buyers or sellers in the wholesale distribution of goods. These commissions and fees are paid to the agent and broker firms by the buyers and/or sellers who have title to the goods. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Commissions received for sales made on the account of others as percent of sales on the account of others (%)

Total commissions (commissions, selling, and listing fees received by agents and brokers acting on behalf of buyers or sellers) as a percent of total sales made on the account of others (on behalf of buyers or sellers, without taking title to the goods sold).

Communication Services ($1,000)

Construction workers annual wages ($1,000)

See description in Annual Payroll.

Construction workers for pay period including December 12

See description in Number of employees.

Construction workers for pay period including June 12

See description in Number of employees

Construction workers for pay period including March 12

See description in Number of employees

Construction workers for pay period including September 12

See description in Number of employees.

Construction, production and/or development and exploration workers annual hours (1,000)

General Definition

The annual number of hours worked by the construction, production, or mining’s production and development exploration workers at the establishment.  Includes direct labor (including first-line supervisors) and actual overtime hours (not straight-time equivalent hours). It excludes the following:

·         hours paid for vacations, holidays, and sick leave unless an employee elects to work during their vacation period

·         hours of proprietors or partners

·         hours worked by temporary staff or leased employees

·         hours worked by employees of contractors or subcontractors

Data are shown in thousands of hours (1,000).

Consumption quantity

This item shows information collected on the consumption of the major supplies used in mining for the quantities of materials, fuels, and supplies consumed with mining within the year. Included are those materials or fuels which were important parts of the cost of production in a particular industry and for which cost information was available from establishments' records. The inquiries were restricted to those supplies that were important parts of the cost of production, exploration, and development in a particular industry.

Quantities in the unit of measure specified.

Cost of construction work subcontracted out to others ($1,000)

Cost of goods sold ($1,000)

Beginning inventory plus purchases of goods for resale minus ending inventory. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed ($1,000)

General Definition

This term refers to the total costs for materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed.  It includes freight charges and other direct charges incurred by the establishment in acquiring these supplies and/or materials used throughout the year.

For the Construction Sector, this is construction's job-site, general office, and all other material, part, and supply costs relating to the construction and other business activities of the establishment.

Sector-Specific Information

Construction Sector

Includes cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed, cost of construction work subcontracted out to others, cost of purchased land, total cost of selected power, fuels, and lubricants, cost of gasoline and diesel fuel, cost of natural gas and manufactured gas, cost of on-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel, cost of off-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel, cost of all other fuels and lubricants, and cost of purchased electricity.

Total selected costs are comprised of ten cost types that were collected for the Construction industries:

  1. Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed ($1,000)
  2. Cost of construction work subcontracted out to others ($1,000)
  3. Cost of purchased land ($1,000)
  4. Total cost of selected power, fuels, and lubricants ($1,000)
  5. Cost of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  6. Cost of natural gas and manufactured gas ($1,000)
  7. Cost of on-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  8. Cost of off-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel ($1,000)
  9. Cost of all other fuels and lubricants ($1,000)
  10. Cost of purchased electricity ($1,000)

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

These types of costs are defined as:

  • Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed-equipment purchased by an establishment that was installed in a building as an integral part of its structure, such as elevators, heating and air conditioning equipment, etc. Costs after discounts for the materials, parts, and supplies that were purchased by the establishment or obtained from other establishments of the firm.
  • Cost of construction work subcontracted out to others - Includes all costs for construction work subcontracted out to other construction contractors during the year. Excludes costs from establishments for its purchases of materials, components, and supplies provided to a subcontractor for use.
  • Cost of purchased land - Purchased cost of land or value of raw land for reported construction projects during the covered time.
  • Total cost of selected power, fuels, and lubricants - Includes costs for fuels including gasoline, diesel fuel and lubricants, and electric energy purchased during the year from other firms or received from other establishments of the firm. Also included are costs for natural gas, manufactured gas, fuel oil, and coal and coke products.
  • Cost of gasoline and diesel fuel - This is the cost of gasoline and diesel fuel purchased during the year from other firms or received from other establishments of the firm. This cost in broken down into two different uses of gasoline and diesel fuel costs, They are:

o   Cost of on-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel - On-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel. This is the cost of gasoline and diesel fuel purchased during the year to fuel highway vehicles. A highway vehicle is any self-propelled vehicle designed to carry a load over public highways, whether or not the vehicle was also designed to perform other functions. Examples of vehicles designed to carry a load over public highways are passenger automobiles, trucks, and truck tractors. If a vehicle can be used for a combination of on-highway and off-highway uses and has one fuel tank, the fuel use is not considered off-highway. An example of this is a concrete-mixer truck where the truck engine operates both the engine and the mixing unit by a power take-off and is fueled by a single tank. None of the fuel used in this vehicle is off-highway because of the on-highway use. If the vehicle has separate fuel tanks and engines, the fuel used in a tank used for non-highway use may be considered off-highway use.

o   Cost of off-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel - Off-highway use of gasoline and diesel fuel. This is the cost of gasoline and diesel fuel purchased during the reporting year for off-highway use. Off-highway fuel use is the use of fuel for trade, business, or income producing activity. In most cases, off-highway fuel use does not include use in a highway vehicle registered or required to be registered for use on public highways.

  • Cost of natural gas and manufactured gas - This is the cost of natural gas and manufactured gas purchased during the year from other firm or received from other establishments of the firm.
  • Cost of all other fuels and lubricants - This is the cost of fuels and lubricants purchased during the year from other firms or received from other establishments of the firm that are not included as costs in any of these categories: natural gas; manufactured gas; gasoline; and diesel fuel.
  • Cost of purchased electricity - This is the cost of electric energy purchased the year from other firms or received from other establishments of the firm.
Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

Includes the cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed; cost of resales; cost of purchased fuels consumed; cost of purchased electricity; and the cost of contract work.

Total costs of supplies and/or materials are comprised of five cost types that were collected for the Manufacturing and Mining industries:

        1.  Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, mineral               received, or purchased machinery installed ($1,000)

        2.  Cost of resales ($1,000)

        3.  Cost of purchased fuels consumed ($1,000)

        4.  Cost of purchased electricity ($1,000)

        5.  Cost of contract work ($1,000)

For Manufacturing Sector, the five types of costs are defined as:

  • Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed - Materials, packaging, parts, components, containers, etc. It includes the cost of materials or fuel consumed, whether purchased by the individual establishment from other firms, transferred to it from other establishments of the same firm, or withdrawn from inventory during the year. Establishments producing items subsequently consumed in further production, reported their cost of original materials consumed. Including all raw materials, semi-finished goods, parts, containers, scrap, and supplies put into production or used as operating supplies and for repair and maintenance during the year. Excludes materials, supplies, machinery, and equipment chargeable to fixed asset accounts and used in the construction of new structures or additions to establishments, or new machinery and equipment.
  • Cost of resales - Cost of products bought and sold in the same condition.
  • Cost of purchased fuels consumed - Includes the cost of fuels consumed, whether purchased by the individual establishment from other firms, transferred to it from other establishments of the same firm, or withdrawn from inventory during the year.
  • Cost of purchased electricity - Cost of purchased electric energy represents the amount actually used during the year for heat and power. In addition, information was collected on the quantity of electric energy generated by the establishment and the quantity of electric energy sold or transferred to other plants of the same firm.
  • Cost of contract work - Cost of work done by others on materials furnished by the manufacturing establishment. The actual fee a firm pays to another firm to perform a service.

In addition to the total cost of materials, which every establishment was required to report, information also was collected for most manufacturing industries on the consumption of major materials used in manufacturing. The inquiries were restricted to those materials that were important parts of the cost of production in a particular industry and for which cost information was available from manufacturers' records. The aggregate of the cost of materials figures for industry groups and for all manufacturing industries includes large amounts of duplication since the products of some industries are used as materials by others. This duplication results, in part, from the addition of related industries representing successive stages in the production of a finished manufactured product. Examples are the addition of flour mills to bakeries in the food group and the addition of pulp mills to paper mills in the paper and allied products group of industries.

For Mining Sector, the five types of costs are defined as:

  • Cost of materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed -Materials, parts, and supplies used; and minerals received for preparation. Cost of extraction/mining/quarrying-related materials purchased for other firms (contractors). Cost of materials purchased or received from other domestic reporting units of the firm. Excludes non-extraction/mining/quarrying-related expenses that were paid to other firms.
  • Cost of resales - Products bought and sold without further processing (products bought and resold in the same condition as when purchased). Excludes oil, gas or natural gas liquids.
  • Cost of purchased fuels consumed - Purchased fuels consumed for heat, power, or the generation of electricity. Total amount actually paid or payable for all purchased fuels consumed. Includes fuels or coal consumed at the domestic establishment, but produced at another domestic establishment. Fuel used to power on-site trucks, forklifts, or motor vehicles. Anthracite, lignite, bituminous, and subbituminous coal, coke, natural and manufactured gas, gasoline, wood, purchased steam, and all other fuels. Excludes gas purchased for gas lift, crude petroleum, natural gas, and coal produced at the domestic establishment and used for heat, power, or the generation of electricity.
  • Cost of purchased electricity - Purchased electricity actual amount paid or payable for electric energy purchased during 2017 from other firms or received from other domestic establishments of the reporting firm. Excludes the value of electricity generated and used at the domestic firm.
  • Cost of contract work - Work done for the firm by others on the firm's materials (work contracted to others).

In addition to the total cost materials, components, packaging and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed which every establishment was required to report, information also was collected on the consumption of the major supplies used in mining. The inquiries were restricted to those supplies that were important parts of the cost of production, exploration, and development in a particular industry and for which cost information was available from the establishment's records. Except for the crude petroleum and natural gas and the support activities for mining industries, figures were also obtained on crude minerals mined at the establishment, received from other establishments of the firm or purchased from others, and received for preparation on a custom or toll basis.

Cost of purchased electricity for resale ($1,000)

Cost of electricity purchased for resale.

Cost of purchased natural gas for resale ($1,000)

Cost of natural gas purchased for resale.

Cost of purchased transportation ($1,000)

Cost of purchased transportation by transportation mode.

Crude oil storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)

Total shell stationary storage capacity for crude oil and asphalt, regardless of volume of products. Data are shown in thousands of gallons.

Current operating expenses for exploration, development, and mineral land and rights ($1,000)

Current operating expenses for royalty payments ($1,000)

Data processing and other purchased computer services ($1,000)

Delivered cost ($1,000)

This item refers to the costs for materials or fuels consumed. It consists of components, packing and/or supplies used, minerals received, or purchased machinery installed. It includes freight charges and other direct charges incurred by the establishment in acquiring these supplies for fuels and/or materials used throughout the year in manufacturing or mining.

For mining, it includes the cost of extraction/mining/quarrying-related materials purchased for other firms (contractors). Cost of materials purchased or received from other domestic reporting units of the firm. Excludes non-extraction/mining/quarrying-related expenses that were paid to other firms.

For manufacturing, it includes the cost whether purchased by the individual establishment form other firms, transferred to it from other establishments of the same firm, or withdrawn from inventory during the year. Establishments producing items subsequently consumed in further production, reported their cost of original materials consumed. Including all raw materials, semi-finished goods, parts, containers, scrap, and supplies put into production or used as operating supplies and for repair and maintenance during the year. Excludes materials, supplies, machinery, and equipment chargeable to fixed asset accounts and used in the construction of new structures or additions to establishments, or new machinery and equipment.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Distribution of sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

The distribution of sales, value of shipments, or revenue in specified categories as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Employer's cost for defined benefit pension plans ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).

Employer's cost for defined contribution plans ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).

Employer's cost for health insurance ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).

Employers cost for legally required fringe benefits ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).  

Employer's cost for other fringe benefits ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).  

Employers cost for voluntarily provided fringe benefits ($1,000)

See description in Total fringe benefits ($1,000).

Expensed computer hardware and other equipment ($1,000)

Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and rights ($1,000)

General Definition

This term refers to the mineral property expenses associated with the development or exploration of mines. It includes expenses for mineral properties for all supplies, machinery, equipment, parts, fuel, power, and cost of maintenance and repairs that was used for development or exploration and charged as current operating expenses.

Total mineral property expenses is comprised of four types that were collected for the Mining Industry:

  1. Expensed mineral exploration, development, land, and rights ($1,000) - This is defined as the sum of the current operating expenses for exploration, development, and mineral land and rights ($1,000) and the current operating expenses for loyalty payments ($1,000), excluding lease rents.
  2. Current operating expenses for exploration, development, and mineral land and rights ($1,000) - Acquisition and labor costs associated with exploration and development of mineral properties.
  3. Current operating expenses for royalty payments ($1,000) - Royalty payments are based on a percentage of the minerals or other products produced at the mine or of the revenues or profits generated from the sale of those minerals or other products at the mine related to mineral production.
  4. Lease rents ($1,000) - Land owners lease of land agreements to grant mineral rights and access to their property for mining purposes. A legal contract for the right to work a mine and extract the mineral or other valuable deposits from it under prescribed conditions of time, price, rental, or royalties.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).
 

Expensed purchases of software ($1,000)

Expenses for maintenance and repair ($1,000)

Establishment reported expenses for the maintenance and repair of buildings, structures, or communication lines that they own. This value does NOT include expenses for such activities as janitorial services, cleaning, lawn maintenance, etc.

Expenses for maintenance and repair for work done by own employees ($1,000)

Value of reported expenses for maintenance and repair work that was done by own employees, as opposed to work done by contractors or other hired labor.

Finished goods or minerals products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the year prior to the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information:

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels.  LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value). 

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

1.  finished goods

2. work-in-process

3. materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

1.  mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids

2.  supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

1.      Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)

2.      Not subject to LIFO costing

3.      Valuation method not reported

4.      Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value

5.      First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing

6.      Average cost

7.      Standard cost

8.      Other non-LIFO inventory

Finished goods or minerals products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids inventories, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the reporting year (and/or the prior year if applicable), regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels.  LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value).

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

1.  finished goods

2. work-in-process

3. materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

1.  mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids

2.  supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

1.      Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)

2.      Not subject to LIFO costing

3.      Valuation method not reported

4.      Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value

5.      First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing

6.      Average cost

7.      Standard cost

8.      Other non-LIFO inventory

First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)

Value of inventories using the first in, first out valuation method on December 31st of the reporting year, regardless of where held.  Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

First-quarter payroll ($1,000)

First-quarter payroll includes the payroll paid before deductions to persons employed at any time during the quarter from January to March of the reporting year.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Gross margin ($1,000)

Sales on own account less cost of goods sold.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Gross margin as percent of sales on own account (%)

Gross margin (total sales less cost of goods sold) over sales on own account (sales made by a firm on its own behalf, taking title to the goods sold) expressed as a percent.

Gross profit ($1,000)

Gross margin plus commissions received less operating expenses.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Gross profit as percent of total sales (%)

Gross profit over total sales, value of shipments, or revenue expressed as a percent.

Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), beginning of year ($1,000)

Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), end of year ($1,000)

Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (%)

Percent of value of shipments by the Herfindahl-Hirschman index for 50 largest companies.

Industry contribution to total NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

Percent of industry contribution to total NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventory valuation, beginning of year ($1,000)

Last-in, first-out (LIFO) inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

Value of inventories using the last in, first out valuation method before reserve adjustment on December 31st of the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

See description in Total inventories, end of year ($1,000)

LIFO net value, beginning of year ($1,000)

LIFO net value, end of year ($1,000)

LIFO reserve, beginning of year ($1,000)

General Definition

LIFO reserve is the difference between the first in, first out (FIFO) cost of inventories (gross value) and last in, first out (LIFO) cost of inventories (net value) owned on December 31st of the year prior to the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels. There are several valuation methods used. The valuation methods are based on the costs incurred to acquire the inventory and get it ready for sale. LIFO users were asked to first report inventory values prior to the LIFO adjustment and then to report the LIFO reserve and the LIFO value after adjustment for the reserve. LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value).

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

  1. Finished goods
  2. Work-in-process
  3. Materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

  1. Mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids
  2. Supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

  1. Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)
  2. Not subject to LIFO costing
  3. Valuation method not reported
  4. Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value
  5. First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing
  6. Average cost
  7. Standard cost
  8. Other non-LIFO inventory

LIFO reserve, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

LIFO reserve is the difference between the first in, first out (FIFO) cost of inventories (gross value) and last in, first out (LIFO) cost of inventories (net value) owned on December 31st of the reporting year. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels. There are several valuation methods used. The valuation methods are based on the costs incurred to acquire the inventory and get it ready for sale. LIFO users were asked to first report inventory values prior to the LIFO adjustment and then to report the LIFO reserve and the LIFO value after adjustment for the reserve. LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value).

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

  1. Finished goods
  2. Work-in-process
  3. Materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

  1. Mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids
  2. Supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

  1. Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)
  2. Not subject to LIFO costing
  3. Valuation method not reported
  4. Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value
  5. First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing
  6. Average cost
  7. Standard cost
  8. Other non-LIFO inventory

Liquefied petroleum gas storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)

Total shell stationary storage capacity for liquefied petroleum, natural gas liquids, and compressed or liquefied natural gas, regardless of volume pf products held.  Data are shown in thousands of gallons.

Materials and/or supplies, parts, fuels, etc. inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the year prior to the reporting year, regardless of where held.  Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels.  LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value). 

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

1.  finished goods

2. work-in-process

3. materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

1.  mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids

2.  supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

1.      Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)

2.      Not subject to LIFO costing

3.      Valuation method not reported

4.      Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value

5.      First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing

6.      Average cost

7.      Standard cost

8.      Other non-LIFO inventory

Materials and/or supplies, parts, fuels, etc. inventories, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the reporting year (and/or the prior year if applicable), regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels.  LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value). 

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

1.  finished goods

2. work-in-process

3. materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

1.  mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids

2.  supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

1.      Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)

2.      Not subject to LIFO costing

3.      Valuation method not reported

4.      Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value

5.      First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing

6.      Average cost

7.      Standard cost

8.      Other non-LIFO inventory

Meaning of class of customer code

Class of customer categories.

Meaning of employment size of establishments code

Employment size categories of establishments. Employment size categories are based on the number of paid employees.

Meaning of employment size of firms code

Employment size categories of firms. Employment size categories are based on the number of paid employees.

Meaning of enterprise support industry served code

Enterprise support industry served.

Meaning of exported services status indicator

Exported services status indicator.

Meaning of firm concentration code

Concentration of sales, value of shipments, or revenue by largest firm size ranges.

Meaning of franchise status code

Franchise status.

Meaning of kind-of-business construction code

The kind-of-business construction code is based on the primary construction’s business activity. It is displayed by the construction kind-of-business activity by dollar value of business done.

The construction kind-of-business activity is the primary construction activity which represents the main activities for which an establishment was contracted.  The other kind-of-business activity include business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without an operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other nonconstruction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included in other kinds of business activities.

Meaning of legal form of organization code

The legal form of organization, generally based on information from administrative records of other federal agencies.

Meaning of location of construction work by state code

The location of construction work by state code refers to the state location where the construction work was done. It is displayed by the location of construction work by state code by its value of construction work.

A construction establishment can be physically located in one state and perform construction activities in another state(s). This code (location of construction work by state) identifies that state where construction work was done, not the actual physical location of the establishment.

Meaning of sales, value of shipments, or revenue size of establishments code

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue size categories of establishments.

Meaning of sales, value of shipments, or revenue size of firms code

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue size categories of firms.

Meaning of single unit/multiunit firm code

Type of establishment (single unit or multiunit) and, if multiunit, establishment size categories for multiunit firms.

Meaning of tax status code

In addition to being classified by kind of business, establishments in selected services sectors are also classified by whether the business is subject to or exempt from federal income taxes. A total is also shown when data are published for both categories.

Meaning of type of operation code

In addition to being classified by kind of business, merchant wholesale establishments are also classified by type of operation according to the ownership of the business and character of the transactions. Merchant wholesale establishments are grouped into two major types of operation and related subgroups:

Merchant wholesalers, except manufacturers' sales branches and offices

Establishments primarily engaged in buying and selling merchandise on their own account. Included here are such types of establishments as wholesale distributors and jobbers, importers, exporters, own-brand importers/marketers, terminal and country grain elevators, and farm products assemblers. For a detailed description of each of these types of establishments, see the Wholesale Trade data.

Manufacturers' sales branches and offices

Establishments primarily maintained by manufacturing, refining, and mining companies apart from their plants or mines for marketing their products at wholesale. Sales branches and offices located at plants or administrative offices are classified as manufacturers' sales branches or offices, if separate records are available.

NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue as % of industry sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue as a percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue for the industry.  NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue and/or NAPCS collection code percents may not sum to totals due to exclusion of selected NAPCS collection codes to avoid disclosing data for individual companies, due to rounding, and/or due to exclusion of NAPCS collection codes that did not meet publication criteria.

NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue as % of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments with the NAPCS collection code (%)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of a NAPCS collection code as a percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of an industry handling the NAPCS collection code.

Net value of construction work ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Non-LIFO costing, beginning of year ($1,000)

Non-LIFO costing, end of year ($1,000)

Number of employees

General Definition

This definition of paid employees is the same as that used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Forms 941 or 944. Paid employees consist of full- and part-time employees, including salaried officers and executives of corporations and salaried members of professional service organizations or associations, who were on the payroll during the pay period including March 12. Included are employees on paid sick leave, paid holidays, and paid vacations.

Excluded are proprietors and partners of unincorporated businesses; independent (nonemployee) agents; full- and part-time leased employees whose payroll was filed under an employee leasing company's Employer Identification Number (EIN); temporary staffing obtained from a staffing service; employees in leased departments; and subcontractors and their employees.

Note: For employment and related fields (payroll, production hours, benefits), respondents were asked to report only those full- and part-time employees whose payroll was reported on the IRS Forms 941 or 944 filing for the Employer Identification Number (EIN) used by that establishment. Other temporary workers and workers whose payroll was reported under a different firm's EIN were reported elsewhere. Comparisons of census-year data and data for earlier years should be used with caution.

Sector-Specific Information:

Manufacturing Sector

The "all employees" number is the number of production workers who were on the payroll for the pay period including March 12 plus the number of other employees who were on the payroll in mid-March.

The "production workers" number includes workers (up through the line-supervisor level) engaged in fabricating, processing, assembling, inspecting, receiving, storing, handling, packing, warehousing, shipping (but not delivering), maintenance, repair, janitorial and guard services, product development, auxiliary production for plant's own use (e.g., power plant), recordkeeping, and other services closely associated with these production operations at the establishment covered by the report. Employees above the working-supervisor level are excluded from this item. This “production workers” number is shown for each of the production workers who were on the payroll during the pay periods including the 12th of March, June, September, and December.

The "other employees" number covers nonproduction employees of the manufacturing establishment, including those engaged in factory supervision above the line-supervisor level. It includes sales (including driver-salespersons), sales delivery (highway truck drivers and their helpers), advertising, credit, collection, installation and servicing of own products, clerical and routine office functions, executive, purchasing, financing, legal, personnel (including cafeteria, medical, etc.), professional, and technical employees. Also included are employees on the payroll of the manufacturing establishment engaged in the construction of major additions or alterations utilized as a separate work force.

Mining Sector

The "production, development, and exploration workers" number includes workers (up through the working-supervisor level) engaged in manual work (using tools, operating machines, hauling materials, loading and hauling products out of the mine, and caring for mines, plants, mills, shops, or yards). Included are exploration work, mine development, storage, shipping, maintenance, repair, janitorial and guard services, auxiliary production for use at establishments (e.g., power plants), recordkeeping, and other services closely associated with these production operations at the establishment covered by the report. Gang and straw bosses and supervisors who performed manual labor are included, as are employees paid on either a time- or piece-rate basis. Also included are miners paid on a per ton, car, or yard basis and persons engaged by them and paid out of the total amount received by these miners. Employees above the working-supervisor level and those of contractors are excluded from this item.

The "other employees" number covers nonproduction employees of the mining establishment including those engaged in the following activities: supervision above the working-supervisor level, sales, highway trucking or other transportation (by employees not entering mines or pits), advertising, credit, collection, clerical and routine office functions, executive, purchasing, financing, legal, personnel (including cafeteria, medical, etc.), and professional (engineers, geologists, etc.) and technical work. Also included are employees on the payroll of the mining establishment engaged in the construction of major additions or alterations utilized as a separate work force. Workers engaged in regular maintenance and repair operations are excluded here but are classified as production, development, and exploration workers. Employees of contractors are excluded from this item.

Construction Sector

The "all employees" number is the sum of non-leased construction workers plus the number of other non-leased employees who were on the payroll for the pay period including March 12.  Excluded are subcontractors and their employees.

The “construction workers” number includes all non-leased payroll workers (up through the working supervisory level) directly engaged in construction operations, such as painters, carpenters, plumbers, and electricians. Included are journeymen, mechanics, apprentices, laborers, truck drivers and helpers, equipment operators, on-site record keepers, and security guards. Supervisory employees above the working foreman level are excluded from this category and are included in the other employees category.  This “construction workers” number is shown for each of the construction workers who were on the payroll during the pay periods including the 12th of March, June, September, and December.

The "other employees" number includes non-leased payroll employees in executive, purchasing, accounting, personnel, professional, technical activities, and routine office functions. Also included are supervisory employees above the working foreman level. This “other employees” number is shown for each of the other employees who were on the payroll during the pay periods including the 12th of March, June, September, and December.

Number of establishments

General Definition

An establishment is a single physical location at which business is conducted, services are provided, or industrial operations are performed. It is not necessarily identical with a firm or enterprise, which may consist of one establishment or more.

Economic census figures represent a summary of reports for individual establishments rather than firms. For cases where a census report was received, separate information was obtained for each location where business was conducted. When administrative records of other federal agencies were used instead of a census report, no information was available on the number of locations operated. Each economic census establishment was tabulated according to the physical location at which the business was conducted. The count of establishments represents those in business at any time during the census year.

When two activities or more were carried on at a single location under a single ownership, all activities generally were grouped together as a single establishment. The entire establishment was classified on the basis of its major activity and all data for it were included in that classification. However, when distinct and separate economic activities (for which different industry classification codes were appropriate) were conducted at a single location under a single ownership, separate establishment reports for each of the different activities were obtained in the census.

Leased departments are considered separate establishments and are classified according to the kind of business they conduct. For example, a beauty shop in a department store or a gift shop located in a hospital would be treated as separate establishments.

Sector-Specific Information:

Mining Sector

The establishment basis for reporting crude petroleum and support activities for mining industries is different from the establishment basis used for other types of mining. Firms operating oil and gas wells, drilling wells, or exploring for oil and gas for their own account were required to submit a separate report for each state or offshore area adjacent to a state in which it conducted such activities. Firms that performed contract services for oil and gas field operation or for mining establishments were required to submit one report covering all such activities in the United States and to include information on receipts for services and production-worker wages and hours by state. These consolidated reports were then allocated to state establishments based on the data reported at the state level.

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Sector

Data for individual properties leased or managed by property lessors or property managers are not normally considered separate establishments, but rather the permanent offices from which the properties are leased or managed are considered establishments. Data for separate automotive rental offices or concessions (e.g., airport locations) in the same metropolitan area, for which a common fleet of cars is maintained, are merged together and not considered as separate establishments.

Number of establishments by primary method of receiving bulk liquid products

Number of establishments primarily receiving petroleum product deliveries by specified mode (barge, pipeline, railroad car, tanker ship, or truck).

Number of establishments in business at end of year

Number of establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Number of establishments with NAPCS collection code as % of industry establishments

Number of establishments with NAPCS collection code as a percent of the number of establishments in the industry.

Number of firms

A firm is a business organization or entity consisting of one or more domestic establishments (locations) under common ownership or control. A firm may be a business, service, or membership organization; consist of one or several establishments; and operate at one or several locations. All establishments of subsidiary firms are included as part of the owning or controlling firm. For the economic census, the terms 'firm,’ ‘company,’ and ‘enterprise’ are synonymous.

Operating expenses ($1,000)

Operating expenses include payroll, employee benefits, interest and rent expenses, payroll taxes, cost of supplies used for operation, depreciation expenses, fundraising expenses, contracted or purchased services, and other expenses charged to operations during the reporting year.  Operating expenses exclude cost of goods sold, income taxes, and interest for wholesale establishments; outlays for the purchase of real estate; construction and all other capital improvements; funds invested; assessments or dues paid to the parent or other chapters of the same organization; and, for fundraising organizations, funds transferred to charities and other organizations.

Other employees annual wages ($1,000)

See description in Annual Payroll.

Other employees for pay period including December 12

See description in Number of employees.

Other employees for pay period including June 12

See description in Number of employees.

Other employees for pay period including March 12

See description in Number of employees.

Other employees for pay period including September 12

See description in Number of employees.

Other non-LIFO inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

Value of inventories using valuation methods other than LIFO, FIFO, average cost, or standard cost on December 31st of the reporting year, regardless of where held.  Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

See description in Total inventories, end of year ($1,000)

Production and/or development and exploration workers annual wages ($1,000)

See description in Annual Payroll.

Production and/or development and exploration workers for pay period including March 12

See description in Number of employees.

Production workers for pay period including December 12

See description in Number of employees.

Production workers for pay period including June 12

See description in Number of employees.

Production workers for pay period including September 12

See description in Number of employees.

Production and/or development and exploration workers annual wages ($1,000)

See description in Annual Payroll.

Purchased professional and technical services ($1,000)

Purchases

Total cost of all merchandise purchased for resale to customers net of returns, allowances, and trade and cash discounts, but including amounts allowed for trade-ins. Includes:

  1. Merchandise to which firms took title in current year, whether or not payment was made in current year.
  2. Raw and finished goods.
  3. Cash and credit purchases.
  4. Merchandise in transit to a given establishment or to a customer to which the establishment has taken title.
  5. Amounts allowed for trade-ins.
  6. Freight, delivery, and other transportation costs.
  7. Import duties (if paid separately).
  8. The cost of purchased services that were resold.
  9. Merchandise sold by a given establishment from the inventory of other establishments of the firm.
  10. Parts and supplies used in repair work or other service type activities.

Excludes:

  1. Expenditures for supplies, equipment, and parts purchased for a firm’s own use.
  2. Purchases of liquor and tobacco tax stamps.
  3. Merchandise to which a firm never took title.
  4. Sales and other taxes collected directly from customers and paid directly to a federal, state, or local agency.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Quantity of electricity purchased for heat and power (1,000 kWh)

Quantity produced for the NAPCS collection code

Quantity produced for the NAPCS collection code.

Quantity shipped for the NAPCS collection code

Quantity shipped for the NAPCS collection code.

Range indicating percent of total annual payroll imputed

Range indicating percent of annual payroll that was imputed based on historic data, industry averages, or other statistical methods and not directly reported nor obtained from “equivalent quality" data sources.  Equivalent quality data are data obtained from an alternative source of sufficient quality such that its data are treated as reported data when calculating standard response measures.  For additional information, see Appendix D3-B of the Census Bureau's Statistical Quality Standards, "Requirements for Calculating and Reporting Response Rates:  Economic Surveys and Censuses."

Range indicating percent of total employees imputed

Range indicating percent of total employees that was imputed based on historic data, industry averages, or other statistical methods and not directly reported nor obtained from “equivalent quality" data sources.  Equivalent quality data are data obtained from an alternative source of sufficient quality such that its data are treated as reported data when calculating standard response measures.  For additional information, see Appendix D3-B of the Census Bureau's Statistical Quality Standards, "Requirements for Calculating and Reporting Response Rates: Economic Surveys and Censuses."

Range indicating percent of total NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue imputed

Percent of total North American Product Classification System (NAPCS) collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue that was imputed based on historic data, industry averages, or other statistical methods and not directly reported nor obtained from "equivalent quality" data sources.  Equivalent quality data are data obtained from an alternative source of sufficient quality such that its data are treated as reported data when calculating standard response measures.  For additional information, see Appendix D3-B of the Census Bureau's Statistical Quality Standards, "Requirements for Calculating and Reporting Response Rates: Economic Surveys and Censuses."

Range indicating percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue imputed

Range indicating percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue that was imputed based on historic data, industry averages, or other statistical methods and not directly reported nor obtained from “equivalent quality" data sources.  Equivalent quality data are data obtained from an alternative source of sufficient quality such that its data are treated as reported data when calculating standard response measures.  For additional information, see Appendix D3-B of the Census Bureau's Statistical Quality Standards, "Requirements for Calculating and Reporting Response Rates: Economic Surveys and Censuses."

Refined petroleum products storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)

Total shell stationary storage capacity for refined petroleum products, including gasoline, diesel fuels, oils and lubricants, aviation gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, heavy residuals, and other refined products, such as intermediates and feedstocks, regardless of volume of products held.  Data are shown in thousands of gallons.

Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services ($1,000)

Relative standard error of NAPCS collection code sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

The relative standard error (RSE) is a measure of an estimates' variability that expresses the standard error as a percentage of the estimate to which it refers.  For example, an estimate of $200 that has an estimated standard error of $10 has an estimated RSE of 10/200 = 0.05 or 5 percent when expressed as a percentage.  The RSE may also be referred to as a coefficient of variation (CV).  For additional information on measures of variability, see the technical documentation.

Rental payments or lease payments for buildings and other structures ($1,000)

General Definition

The total rental payments are rental payments or lease payments for buildings, other structures, machinery, and equipment rentals.  Includes operating leases. It is defined as the following two types:

1.      Rental payments or lease payments for buildings and other structures - Includes all costs for renting or leasing space and buildings. Also includes job-site trailers and land on which the buildings and other structures stand. Excludes costs under agreements that are in effect conditional sales contracts such as capital leases.

2.      Rental payments or lease payments for machinery and equipment rentals – Includes production, loading, and transportation machinery and equipment, construction equipment, tools, office equipment, furniture, and vehicles.  Excludes computer time-sharing charges for machinery and equipment rentals from computer service firms where the computer is not on site at the establishment.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Rental payments or lease payments for machinery and equipment ($1,000)

General Definition

The total rental payments are rental payments or lease payments for buildings, other structures, machinery, and equipment rentals.  Includes operating leases. It is defined as the following two types:

1.      Rental payments or lease payments for buildings and other structures - Includes all costs for renting or leasing space and buildings. Also includes job-site trailers and land on which the buildings and other structures stand. Excludes costs under agreements that are in effect conditional sales contracts such as capital leases.

2.      Rental payments or lease payments for machinery and equipment rentals – Includes production, loading, and transportation machinery and equipment, construction equipment, tools, office equipment, furniture, and vehicles.  Excludes computer time-sharing charges for machinery and equipment rentals from computer service firms where the computer is not on site at the establishment.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery ($1,000)

Response coverage of class of customer inquiry (%)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments responding to class of customer inquiry as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Response coverage of construction activity capital expenditures inquiry (%)

Revenue of establishments responding to construction activity capital expenditures for new construction inquiry as a percent of revenue.

Response coverage of construction activity expenses for maintenance & repair inquiry (%)

 

Revenue of establishments responding to construction activity expenses for maintenance and repair inquiry as a percent of revenue.

Response coverage of cost of purchased electricity inquiry (%)

Revenue of establishments responding to cost of purchased electricity inquiry as a percent of total revenue.

Response coverage of cost of purchased natural gas inquiry (%)

Revenue of establishments responding to cost of purchased natural gas inquiry as a percent of total revenue.

Response coverage of cost of purchased transportation inquiry (%)

Revenue of establishments responding to cost of purchased transportation inquiry as a percent of total revenue.

Response coverage of employment by function inquiry (%)

Employment of establishments responding to employment by function inquiry as percent of total employment. (%)

Response coverage of exported energy inquiry (%)

Revenue of establishments responding to exported energy inquiry as a percent of total revenue.

Response coverage of exported services employment (%)

Employment of establishments responding to exported services inquiry as percent of total employment.

Response coverage of exported services sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments responding to exported services inquiry as a percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Response coverage of franchise inquiry (%)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments responding to franchise status inquiry as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Response coverage of inventories by valuation method inquiry (%)

Ending inventories of establishments responding to inventories by valuation method inquiry as a percent of total ending inventories.

Response coverage of inventories inquiry (%)

Annual payroll of establishments responding to end of year inventories inquiry as a percent of total annual payroll.

Response coverage of primary method of receiving bulk liquid products inquiry (%)

Establishments reporting primary method of receiving bulk liquid products as a percent of all establishments. (%)

Response coverage of total under-roof floor space inquiry (%)

Sales of establishments in business at the end of the census year responding to the total under-roof floor space inquiry as percent of total sales of all establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Response coverage of under-roof selling space inquiry (%)

Sales of establishments in business at the end of the census year responding to the under-roof selling space inquiry as percent of total sales of all establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Revenue from exports ($1,000)

Value of total reported operating revenue from exports to customers in Canada and Mexico.

Revenue from the sale of electricity purchased for resale ($1,000)

Revenue from the sale of electricity purchased for resale.

Revenue from the sale of natural gas purchased for resale ($1,000)

Revenue from the sale of natural gas purchased for resale.

Sales made on the account of others ($1,000)

Sales made by agents and brokers acting on behalf of buyers or sellers in the wholesale distribution of goods. The agents and brokers do not take title to the goods being sold on the account of others but rather receive a commission or fee for their service. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sales made on the account of others as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

Sales made by agents and brokers acting on behalf of buyers or sellers over the total sales, value of shipments, or revenue, expressed as a percent.

Sales on own account ($1,000)

Sales made by a firm on its own behalf. For sales on own account the firm takes title to the goods being sold.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue from exported services ($1,000)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue from exported services.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue ($1,000)

General Definition

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue refers to all appropriate dollar volume measures including total sales, value of shipments, revenue, receipts, or business done at any time during the census year, whether or not payment was received during the census year, by domestic establishments (excluding foreign subsidiaries) within the scope of the economic census. Detailed descriptions of each are included in the sector-specific information below.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Accommodation and Food Services Sector

Includes sales from customers for services rendered, from the use of facilities, and from merchandise sold.

Excludes carrying or other credit charges; sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others; and commissions or revenue from the sale of government lottery tickets.

Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services; Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation; Educational Services; Health Care and Social Assistance; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services; and Other Services (except Public Administration)

For service establishments subject to federal income tax, this includes gross revenue from customers or clients for services provided, from the use of facilities, and from merchandise sold. For advertising agencies, travel industries, and other service establishments operating on a commission basis, revenue includes commissions, fees, and other operation income, NOT gross billings and sales. Excise taxes on gasoline, liquor, tobacco, etc., which are paid by the manufacturer or wholesaler and passed on in the cost of goods purchased by the service establishment, are also included. The establishments' share of revenue from departments, concessions, and vending and amusement machines operated by others are included. Revenue also includes amounts received from the rental and leasing of vehicles, equipment, instruments, and tools; the total value of service contracts; market value of compensation received in lieu of cash; amounts received for work subcontracted to others; and dues and assessments from members and affiliates. Revenue from services performed for foreign parent firms, subsidiaries, and branches are included. Independent artists, writers, and performers include royalties in revenue.

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others; sales of used equipment previously rented or leased to customers; domestic intracompany transfers; proceeds from the sale of real estate (land and buildings), investments, or other assets (except inventory held for resale); income from interest, rental of real estate, dividends, contributions, and grants; revenue of foreign parent firms and subsidiaries; and other nonoperating income, such as franchise fees. Revenue does not include service receipts of manufacturers, wholesalers, retail establishments, or other businesses whose primary activity is other than services rendered (e.g, sale of merchandise to individuals or other businesses) by establishments primarily engaged in performing services and classified in the service industries. Revenue is net after deductions for refunds and allowances for merchandise returned by customers.

For service establishments exempt from federal income tax, this includes revenue from customers or clients for services provided and gross sales of merchandise, minus returns and allowances. Also included are income from interest, dividends, gross rents (including display space rentals and share of revenue from departments operated by other companies), gross contributions, gifts, grants (whether or not restricted for use in operations), royalties, dues and assessments from members and affiliates, commissions earned from the sale of merchandise owned by others (including commissions from vending machine operators), and gross revenue from fundraising activities. Revenue now includes gains or losses from the sale of real estate (land and buildings), investments, or other assets (except inventory held for resale). Revenue from taxable business activities of firms exempt from federal income tax (unrelated business income) are also included.

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others; and amounts transferred to operating funds from capital or reserve funds.

Construction Sector

Includes the value of construction work done during the year for construction work performed by general contractors and special trade contractors. Included is new construction, additions and alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Also included is the value of any business done by the reporting establishments for themselves.

Speculative builders were instructed to include the value of buildings and other structures built or being built for sale in the current year but not sold. They were to include the costs of such construction plus normal profit. Also included is the cost of construction work done on buildings for rent or lease.

Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of such construction components as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; electrical and wiring supplies; and elevators or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and the receipts covering the price of the items installed.

Finance and Insurance Sector

Includes revenue from all business activities, including commissions and fees from all sources, rents, net investment income, interest, dividends, royalties, and net insurance premiums earned. Revenue from leasing property marketed under operating leases is included, as well as interest earned from property marketed under capital, finance, or full payout leases. Revenue also includes the total value of service contracts and amounts received for work subcontracted to others.

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency.

Information Sector

Includes gross revenue from customers or clients for services provided, from the use of facilities, and from merchandise sold. Revenue includes royalties, license fees, and other payments from the marketing of intangible products (e.g., licensing the use of or granting reproduction rights for software, musical compositions, and other intellectual property). Revenue also includes the rental and leasing of vehicles, equipment, instruments, tools, etc.; total value of service contracts; market value of compensation received in lieu of cash; amounts received for work subcontracted to others; dues and assessments from members and affiliates; this establishment's share of revenue from departments, concessions, and vending and amusement machines operated by others. Sales to and revenue from services performed for foreign parent firms, subsidiaries, and branches are included. Revenue also includes advertising sales, and sales of goods and services marketed through sales offices. For public broadcast stations and libraries, revenue includes contributions, gifts, grants, and income from interest, rental of real estate, and dividends.

Excludes gross revenue collected on behalf of others; sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others. Also excluded are sales of used equipment previously rented or leased to customers; proceeds from the sale of real estate (land and buildings), investments, or other assets (except inventory held for resale); contributions, gifts, grants, and income from interest, rental of real estate, and dividends, EXCEPT for public broadcast stations and libraries; domestic intracompany transfers; revenue of foreign parent firms and subsidiaries; and other nonoperating income (e.g., franchise fees).

Management of Companies and Enterprises Sector

Includes gross revenue from services provided, from the use of facilities, and from merchandise sold. Revenue also includes income from interest, rental of real estate, or dividends; contributions, gifts, and grants of not-for-profit organizations exempt from federal income tax; revenue from services performed for foreign parent firms, subsidiaries, branches, etc; the establishments' share of revenue from departments, concessions, and vending and amusement machines operated by others; revenue from the rental and leasing of vehicles, equipment, instruments, and tools; the total value or service contracts; market value of compensation received in lieu of cash; amounts received for work subcontracted to others; franchise sales and fees, license fees, and royalties; and gains and losses from the sale of real estate (land and bulidings), investments, or other assets (except inventory held for resale).

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others; domestic intracompany transfers; and revenue of foreign parent firms and subsidiaries.

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

Includes the net selling values (exclusive of freight and excise taxes) of all products shipped including installation and repair, sales of scrap, and sales of products bought and sold without further processing. Included are all products physically shipped by the establishments, whether sold, transferred to other plants of the same firm, or shipped on consignments. For products transferred to other establishments of the same firm, or prepared on a custom or toll basis, firms were requested to report the estimated value, not merely the cost of producing the product. In the case of multiunit firms, the mineral operation was requested to report the value of products transferred to the other establishments of the same firm at full economic or commercial value, including not only the direct cost of production but also a reasonable proportion of "all other costs" (including firm overhead) profit.

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Sector

Includes revenue from all business activities, including commissions and fees from all sources, rents, net investment income, interest, dividends, and royalties. Revenue from leasing property marketed under operating leases is included. Revenue also includes the total value of service contracts, amounts received for work subcontracted to others, and rents from real property sublet to others.

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency.

Retail Trade Sector

Includes merchandise sold for cash and credit at retail and wholesale by establishments primarily engaged in retail trade; amounts received from customers for layaway purchases; revenue from rental of vehicles, equipment, instruments, tools, etc.; revenue for delivery, installation, maintenance, repair, alteration, storage, and other services; the total value of service contracts; gasoline, liquor, tobacco, and other excise taxes which are paid by the manufacturer or wholesaler and passed on to the retailer; and shipping and handling receipts. Also included are non-retail merchandise sales by establishments primarily engaged in retail trade to industrial users and to retailers.

Sales are net after deductions for refunds and allowances for merchandise returned by customers. Trade-in allowances are not deducted from sales.

Excludes carrying or other credit charges; sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency; gross revenue of departments or concessions operated by others; and commissions or revenue from the sale of government lottery tickets. Also excluded are retail sales made by manufacturers, wholesalers, service establishments, or other businesses whose primary activity is other than retail trade.

Transportation and Warehousing and Utilities Sectors

Includes revenue from all business activities.

Excludes sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a local, state, or federal tax agency.

Wholesale Trade Sector

Includes merchandise sold for cash and credit by establishments primarily engaged in wholesale trade; receipts for delivery, installation, maintenance, repair, alteration, storage, and other services; the gross selling value of goods the establishment sold or purchased on a commission, brokerage, consignment, or agency basis for others; the actual value of trade-ins taken as partial payment for other merchandise; sales to foreign subsidiaries and affiliates and to the establishment's Foreign Sales Corporations (FSCs); receipts from rental or leasing of merchandise; gasoline, liquor, and tobacco excise taxes which are paid by the manufacturer and included in the cost of the goods purchased; liquor and tobacco stamps, taxes, and licenses sold; fees received for the arrangement of the foreign sale of goods which never entered the United States or its Foreign Trade Zones; shipping and handling receipts; and the value of transfers (billing) of farm products to other establishments in the firm.

Excludes carrying or other credit charges; sales and other taxes collected from customers and paid directly to a federal, state, or local tax agency; nonoperating income from such sources as investments, rental or sale of real estate, and interest; commissions received from selling and buying goods (unless the goods never entered the United States); foreign sale of goods which never entered the United States or its Foreign Trade Zones; refunds or allowances for returned merchandise; and transfers (billings) to other establishments in the firm, except those made by petroleum bulk plants to the firm's own retail service stations, retail fuel oil dealers, and retail liquefied petroleum (LP) gas dealers and those made by establishments selling farm products.

Sales shown for agents and brokers represent the value of the goods involved in the transactions rather than the commissions received or earnings.

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of largest firms as percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue (%)

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue for establishments in a specified firm size range as a percent of total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of all establishments.

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue of NAPCS collection code ($1,000)

Total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of a particular NAPCS collection code.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sales, value of shipments, or revenue per square foot of under-roof selling space (dollars)

Sales per square foot of under-roof selling space for establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Standard cost inventory valuation, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition
Value of inventories using the standard cost valuation method on December 31st of the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others. Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

 

Sector-Specific Information

 

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

See description in Total inventories, end of year ($1,000).

Taxes and license fees ($1,000)

Temporary staff and leased employee expenses ($1,000)

Total all other operating expenses ($1,000)

Total capital expenditures for buildings, structures, machinery, and equipment (new and used) ($1,000)

General Definition 

This term refers to the total capital expenditures for buildings, structures, machinery, and equipment (new and used). It includes the current expenditures for property, equipment, and capital improvements that were or will be chargeable to the fixed asset accounts and for which depreciation or amortization accounts are ordinarily maintained.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing Sector

Total capital expenditures are comprised of two types of expenditures for the Manufacturing Industry:

  1. Capital expenditures for buildings and other structures ($1,000) - New and used buildings and other structures, excluding the value of the land on which structure stand.
  2. Capital expenditures for machinery and equipment ($1,000) - New and used production machinery and equipment, including furniture and fixtures for offices.

The capital expenditures for machinery and equipment is further broken down into three different types:

1.   Capital expenditures for automobiles, trucks, etc. for highway use ($1,000) - Purchased vehicles which are purchased for highway use and vehicle acquired under a lease-purchase agreement, excluding off-highway vehicles leased.

2.   Capital expenditures for computers and peripheral data processing equipment ($1,000) - Purchased computers and related equipment.

3.   Capital expenditures for all other machinery and equipment ($1,000) - Additional new and used production machinery and equipment not included in capital expenditures for automobiles or computers and data processing equipment.

Mining Sector

Total capital expenditures are comprised of four types of expenditures for the Mining Industry:

  1. Capital expenditures (except land and mineral rights) ($1,000) - Value of buildings or other structures completed or equipment put in place throughout the year.
  2. Total capital expenditures for buildings, structures, machinery, and equipment (new and used) ($1,000) - New and used buildings and other structures, excluding the value of the land on which structure stand.
  3. Capital expenditures for mineral exploration and development ($1,000) - Tangible development and exploration outlays that is charged to a capital or Office of Minerals Exploration account, including shafts, surveying, rail and other road construction.
  4. Capital expenditures for mineral land and rights ($1,000) - Capitalized lease outlays necessary to acquire leases, undeveloped or developed acreage, mineral rights, and fee lands incident to mineral exploration, development, and production.

Assets, Depreciation, and Retirements

Construction and Manufacturing Sectors

Depreciable assets are the buildings, structures, machinery, and equipment owned by an establishment or its parents firm for which depreciation accounts are ordinarily maintained, The assets at the beginning of the year plus total capital expenditures, less retirements, equals assets at the end of the year.

  • Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), beginning of year ($1,000) - Improvements and new construction in progress, but not completed at year-end.
  • Gross value of depreciable assets (acquisition costs), end of year ($1,000) - Used buildings, machinery, and equipment at their purchase.
  • Total retirements ($1,000) - Value of asset sold, retired, scrapped, destroyed, etc. including the retirements of any equipment or structures owned.
  • Total depreciation during year ($1,000) - All reported outlays during the year for buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment that are chargeable to the fixed asset account, and for which depreciation or amortization reserves are maintained.

Total fringe benefits ($1,000)

General Definition
The total sum of fringe benefits of all non-leased full-time and part-time employees on the payrolls of firms during any part of the year. Includes expenditures made by the employer for legally required and voluntary fringe benefit programs for employees. The legally required portion consists primarily of federal old age and survivors' insurance, unemployment compensation, and workers' compensation. Payments for voluntary programs include all programs not specifically required by legislation, whether they were employer initiated or the result of collective bargaining. They exclude such items as losses on company-operated cafeterias and snack bars, cost of in-plant medical services, cost of free parking lots, discounts on employee purchases, cost of uniforms and other work clothing supplied to employees and similar expenditures, and wages and salaries reported in payroll (holidays, vacations, sick pay, bonuses, jury pay, costs for training, and partially subsidized housing and safety).  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information:

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors
Total benefits are comprised of four benefit types that were collected for the Manufacturing and Mining industries:

  1. Employer's cost for health insurance ($1,000)
  2. Employer's cost for defined benefit pension plans ($1,000)
  3. Employer's cost for defined contribution plans ($1,000)
  4. Employer's cost for other fringe benefits ($1,000)

These four types of fringe benefits are defined as:

  • Employer's benefit for health insurance - Insurance premiums on hospitals, medical plans, and single-service plans such as dental, vision, and prescription drug plans.
  • Employer's benefit for defined benefit pension plans (qualified and nonqualified) - Plans that specify the benefit to be paid to employees upon retirement, generally either a specific amount or a percentage of compensation.  Employer contributions are based on actuarial computations that include employee's compensation and years of service and are not allocated to specific accounts maintained for employees.
  • Employer's defined contribution plans - Plans that define the employer contributions to a separate account provided for each employee. The employee "benefit" at retirement depends on the amount contributed and the results of the account's activity. Examples include:
        o  Profit sharing plans
        o  Money purchases (e.g., 401k, 403b)
        o  Stock bonus plans (e.g., ESOPs)
  • Employer's benefit for other fringe benefits - Payroll taxes, employer-paid insurance premiums, and other employer-paid benefits. Employer's cost for other fringe benefits includes payment towards items such as social security, workers' compensation insurance, unemployment tax, state disability insurance programs, life insurance benefits, Medicare, pre-tax benefit accounts (health and dependent care savings accounts), education assistance, stock options, long-term care insurance, employee assistance programs, and other benefits not specified above.

Construction Sector

Total benefits are comprised of two benefit types that were collected for the Construction industries:

1. Employers cost for legally required fringe benefits ($1,000)

2. Employers cost for voluntarily provided fringe benefits ($1,000)

These two types of fringe benefits are defined as:

  • Legally Required Expenditures - Includes expenditures made by the employer for Social Security and Medicare contributions, unemployment compensation, worker's compensation, and state temporary disability payments.
  • Voluntary Expenditures - Includes expenditures made by the employer for life insurance premiums, pension plans, insurance premiums on hospital and medical plans, welfare plans, and union negotiated benefits.

Total inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the year prior to the reporting year, regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels.  There are several valuation methods used. The valuation methods are based on the costs incurred to acquire the inventory and get it ready for sale. LIFO users were asked to first report inventory values prior to the LIFO adjustment and then to report the LIFO reserve and the LIFO value after adjustment for the reserve. LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value).

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

  1. Finished goods
  2. Work-in-process
  3. Materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

  1. Mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids
  2. Supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

  1. Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)
  2. Not subject to LIFO costing
  3. Valuation method not reported
  4. Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value
  5. First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing
  6. Average cost
  7. Standard cost
  8. Other non-LIFO inventory

Total inventories, end of year ($1,000)

General Definition

The total value of merchandise inventories owned on December 31st of the reporting year (and/or the prior year if applicable), regardless of where held. Excludes the value of inventories held by the establishment but owned by others.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Manufacturing and Mining Sectors

When using inventory data by stage of fabrication for (all industries) and at the three-digit subsector level, it should be noted that an item treated as a finished product by an establishment in one industry may be reported as a raw material by an establishment in a different industry. For example, the finished-product inventories of a steel mill would be reported as raw materials by a stamping plant. Such differences are present in the inventory figures by stage of fabrication shown for all publication levels. There are several valuation methods used. The valuation methods are based on the costs incurred to acquire the inventory and get it ready for sale. LIFO users were asked to first report inventory values prior to the LIFO adjustment and then to report the LIFO reserve and the LIFO value after adjustment for the reserve. LIFO reserve is the difference between the current cost (e.g., First-In, First-Out (FIFO) of inventories (gross value) and the LIFO carrying value (net value).

Total inventories and three stages of fabrication were collected for the Manufacturing industry:

  1. Finished goods
  2. Work-in-process
  3. Materials, supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Total inventories and two stages of fabrication were collected for the Mining industry:

  1. Mineral products, crude petroleum, and natural gas liquids
  2. Supplies, parts, fuels, etc.

Inventory valuation methods include:

  1. Subject to Last-in, First-out (LIFO) costing (including LIFO reserve and value)
  2. Not subject to LIFO costing
  3. Valuation method not reported
  4. Amount subject to LIFO reported without associated reserve and value
  5. First-in, first-out (FIFO) inventory costing
  6. Average cost
  7. Standard cost
  8. Other non-LIFO inventory

Total other operating expenses ($1,000)

General Definition

The total other operating expenses is the sum of all other operating expenses for a firm that is not previously identified. Includes temporary staff and leased employee expenses, expensed computer hardware and other equipment, expensed purchases of software, data processing and other purchased computer services, communication services, repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery, refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services, advertising and promotional services, purchased professional and technical services, taxes and license fees, and any other operating expenses not identified.

The total other operating expenses are comprised of eleven operating expense types that were collected for the Construction, Manufacturing, and Mining Industries:

  1. Temporary staff and leased employee expenses ($1,000)
  2. Expensed computer hardware and other equipment ($1,000)
  3. Expensed purchases of software ($1,000)
  4. Data processing and other purchased computer services ($1,000)
  5. Communication services ($1,000)
  6. Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery ($1,000)
  7. Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services ($1,000)
  8. Advertising and promotional services ($1,000)
  9. Purchased professional and technical services ($1,000)
  10. Taxes and license fees ($1,000)
  11. All other operating expenses ($1,000)

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).
These eleven types of other operating expenses are defined as:

  • Temporary staff and leased employee expenses - Professional Employer Organizations and staffing agencies for personnel. Includes all temporary staff and leased employee charges for payroll, benefits, and services.
  • Expensed computer hardware and other equipment - Expensed computer hardware and other equipment. Includes copiers, fax machines, telephones, shop and lab equipment, CPUs, and monitors. Excludes packaged software or leased and rented equipment.
  • Expensed purchases of software - Purchases of prepackaged, custom-coded, or vendor-customized software. Includes software developed or customized by others, web-design services and purchases, licensing agreements, upgrades of software, and maintenance fees related to software upgrades and alterations.
  • Data processing and other purchased computer services - Computer facilities management services, computer input preparation, data storage, computer time rental, optical scanning services, and other computer-related advice and services, including training. Excludes services provided by other establishments within that firm (such as a separate central data processing unit).
  • Communication services - Telephone, cellular, and fax services, computer-related communications (e.g., Internet, connectivity, online), credit card transaction fees, expensed integrated systems, and other wired and wireless communication services.
  • Repair and maintenance services of buildings and/or machinery - Purchased repairs and maintenance to buildings and/or machinery and equipment. Includes repairs for painting, roof repairs, replacing parts, over-hauling of equipment, and other repairs chargeable as current operating costs. Cost of repair and maintenance of any leased property if the establishment assumed the cost. Excludes extensive "repairs" or reconstruction that is capitalized.
  • Refuse removal (including hazardous waste) services - Water, sewer, refuse removal, and other non-electric utility payments. Includes cost of hazardous waste removal or treatment. Excludes cost of refuse removal services if included in rental payments; machinery or equipment reported as a capital expenditures; and cost of salaries paid to employees of the establishment whose work involves refuse removal and/or hazardous waste removal or treatment.
  • Advertising and promotional services - Purchased advertising and promotional services. Includes marketing and public relations services. Excludes salaries paid to employees of the establishment for advertising work.
  • Purchased professional and technical services - Operating expenses for management consulting, accounting, auditing, bookkeeping, legal, actuarial, payroll processing, architectural, engineering, and/or other professional services (i.e. janitorial, security, or landscape services). Excludes salaries paid to employees of owned establishment for these services.
  • Taxes and license fees - Governmental taxes and licensing fees. Payments to government agencies for taxes and licenses. Includes business and property taxes. Excludes income taxes.
  • All other operating expenses - All other operating expenses not reported elsewhere. Excludes purchases of merchandise for resale and non-operating expenses.

Total rental payments or lease payments ($1,000)

Total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments with the NAPCS collection code ($1,000)

Total sales, value of shipments, or revenue of establishments with sales, value of shipments, or revenue for a particular NAPCS collection code.  Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Total storage capacity, December 31 (1,000 gallons)

Total shell stationary storage capacity for refined petroleum fuels, feedstocks, intermediates, oils and lubricants, crude oil, liquefied petroleum, compressed or liquefied natural gas, and other petroleum liquid products, including asphalt, in operation as of December 31 of the reporting year, regardless of volume of products held. Data are shown in thousands of gallons.

Total storage capacity, December 31, excluding liquified petroleum gas (1,000 gallons)

Total shell stationary storage capacity for refined petroleum fuels, feedstocks, intermediates, oils and lubricants, crude oil, and other petroleum liquid products, including asphalt, in operation as of December 31 of the reporting year, regardless of volume of products held. Excludes liquefied petroleum, natural gas liquids, and compressed or liquefied natural gas. Data are shown in thousands of gallons.

Total under-roof floor space (1,000 square feet)

Total under-roof floor space for establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Under-roof selling space (1,000 square feet)

Under-roof selling space for establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Under-roof selling space as percent of total under-roof floor space (%)

Under-roof selling space as percent of total under-roof floor space for establishments in business at the end of the census year.

Unit of measurement for the NAPCS collection code

Unit of measurement.

Value added ($1,000)

General Definition

The value added is the measure of construction, manufacturing, or mining activities to avoid the duplication in the figure for sales, value of shipments, or revenue.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000).

Sector-Specific Information

Construction Sector

This measure of construction activity is equal to value of business done, less costs for construction work subcontracted out to others and costs for materials, components, supplies, and fuels.

Manufacturing Sector

This measure of manufacturing activity is derived by subtracting the cost of materials, supplies, containers, fuel, purchased electricity, and contract work from the value of shipments (products manufactured plus receipts for services rendered). The result of this calculation is adjusted by the addition of value added by merchandising operations (i.e., the difference between the sales value and the cost of merchandise sold without further manufacture, processing, or assembly) plus the net change in finished goods and work-in-process between the beginning- and end-of-year inventories.

"Value added" avoids the duplication in the figure for value of shipments that results from the use of products of some establishments as materials by others. Value added is considered to be the best value measure available for comparing the relative economic importance of manufacturing among industries and geographic areas.

Mining Sector

This measure of mining activity is derived by subtracting the cost of supplies, minerals received for preparation, purchased machinery installed, purchased fuel, purchased electricity, and contract work from the sum of the value of shipments and receipts for services (mining products plus receipts for services rendered) and capital expenditures. The result of this calculation is adjusted by the addition of value added by merchandising operations (i.e., the difference between the sales value and the cost of products sold without further processing).

"Value added" avoids the duplication in the figure for value of shipments and receipts for services that results from the use of products of some establishments as supplies, energy sources, or materials by others. Moreover, it provides a measure of value added not only in mineral production but also in the development of mineral properties. Value added is considered to be the best value measure available for comparing the relative economic importance of mining among industries and geographic areas.

Value of construction work ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of construction work on federally-owned projects ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of construction work on government-owned projects ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of construction work on privately-owned projects ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of construction work on state and locally-owned projects ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Value of other business done ($1,000)

General Definition

This item includes the receipts, billings, or sales for construction work done by building contractors, heavy and civil engineering construction contractors, and specialty trade contractors. Included are new construction, additions, alterations or reconstruction, and maintenance and repair construction work. Establishments engaged in the sale and installation of construction components such as plumbing, heating, and central air-conditioning supplies and equipment; lumber and building materials; paint, glass, and wallpaper; and electrical and wiring supplies, elevators, or escalators were instructed to include both the value for the installation and receipts covering the price of the items installed. Excluded are the cost of industrial and other special machinery and equipment that are not an integral part of a structure and receipts from business operations in foreign countries. The value of construction work is the percent of the construction work that was reported by firms on their sales, value of shipments, or revenue on projects owned by private businesses, individuals, state and local governments, federal government, and work performed for other contractors or builders. Any work on interstate highways, was reported as state-owned construction.

Total value of construction work owned projects are comprised of five types that were collected for the Construction industry:

  • Value of construction work on government owned projects ($1,000) - This is the total of all projects owned by federal, state, and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on federally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned by the federal government.
  • Value of construction work on state and locally owned projects ($1,000) - This is the summed total value of construction work for all projects owned by state and local governments.
  • Value of construction work on privately owned projects ($1,000) - This is the value of construction work for projects owned privately (excluding government owned projects).
  • Value of construction work subcontracted in from others ($1,000) - Includes the value of construction work done by reporting establishments as subcontractors to other contractors or builders. Establishments were asked to report the approximate percent of total value of construction work accounted for by such work, and the percentages reported were applied to the reported value of construction work to develop a dollar value.

Value of non-construction activity:

  • Value of other business done ($1,000) - Includes the receipts for all other business activities done by an establishment in the current year. Includes business receipts not reported as value of construction work. This includes business receipts from retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment without operator, manufacturing, transportation, legal services, insurance, finance, rental of property and other real estate operations, and other non-construction activities. Receipts for separately definable architectural and engineering work for others are also included here. Excluded are non-operating income such as interest, dividends, the sale of fixed assets, or receipts from other business operations in foreign countries.

Data are shown in thousands of dollars ($1,000)

Work-in-process inventories, beginning of year ($1,000)

Work-in-process inventories, end of year ($1,000)

Year

The reference year for the data.

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