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Hattie McDaniel Stamp

Hattie McDaniel Stamp

Although Hattle McDaniel, of Wichita, KS, appeared in more than 300 movies during her career, she is most famous for her role as "Mammy" in Gone With the Wind. She earned the Best Supporting Actess Academy Award—the first Oscar won by an African American. McDanniel has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (for her work in radio and motion pictures) and beccame the first black Oscar winner to be honored with a U.S. postage stamp in 2006.

Photo courtesy of the U.S. Postal Service.

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind, published in 1936, is one of the most popular romance novels of all time. The book earned Mitchell both a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. The 1939 movie starring Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, and Olivia de Havilland was selected to be preserved by the National Film Registry in 1989, and is in the top ten of the American Film Institute's list of top 100 American films.

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Ruins of the Confederate Enginehouse, Atlanta, GA

Ruins of the Confederate enginehouse, Atlanta, GA

Gone With the Wind's Scarlett O'Hara escaped from the city of Atlanta, GA, after remnants of the Confederate Army set the city aflame before abandoning it to the Union Army. Many of Atlanta's buildings, like the enginehouse sheltering the locomotives "Telegraph" and "O.A. Bull" were destroyed by September 1864.
Photo courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Entertainment Industry Pushes Los Angeles to Third Largest U.S. City in 1953

Filming the Wizard of Oz The entertainment industry has had a profound impact on the demographics of Los Angeles, CA. Following a special census of the city, the Census Bureau announced on December 8, 1953, that the thousands of aspiring actors, screenwriters, camera operators, and special effects technicians moving to Los Angeles made it the third largest city in the United States, surpassing Philadelphia, PA.

Motion picture industry employees were responsible for many of the classic films of Hollywood's "Golden Era," including Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz shown being filmed at the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio in 1939. Both films would compete against each other during the 1939 Academy Awards. Gone With the Wind won 10 awards, including those for "Outstanding Production," director, actress, supporting actress, art direction, cinematography, and film editing, while The Wizard of Oz won for "Best Original Score" and "Best Song."

Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Census History Staff | Last Revised: February 25, 2013