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Monthly Features

125th Anniversary of Wyoming and Idaho Statehood

Wyoming coal trains

July 2015 marks the 125th birthdays of Idaho and Wyoming. When admitted to the United States on July 3, 1890, Idaho's population was 84,385. Wyoming was admitted 7 days later, with a population of 60,705. Today, 584,153 people live in Wyoming and 1,634,464 people call Idaho home.

Both states have strong economic ties to the agriculture, mining, and mineral industries. Wyoming's Powder River Basin is the world's most prolific coal field producing 12 tons of coal per second, while Idaho's farmers produce more than 13.1 billion pounds of potatoes annually!

Photo courtesy of the Wyoming State Geologic Survey.

Medicare Advertisement

Medicare Advertisement

This 1968 poster encourages Americans 65 years and older to learn more about the Medicare benefits available to them by the Social Security Act Amendments of 1965. One year after President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Act Amendments of 1965, 19,082,454 people, 65 or older, had enrolled in Medicare. In 1973, the program expanded to include disabled beneficiaries. By 2013, 42,471,527 people, 65 and older, and 9,783,635 people with disabilities were enrolled in Medicare.

Photo courtesy of the Social Security Administration.

President Lyndon B. Johnson Signs the Social Security Act Amendments of 1965

Social Security Act Amendments of 1965 signing ceremony

By signing the Social Security Act Amendments of 1965 on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson (with Harry S. Truman at his side) established government health programs that benefited millions of elderly and poor Americans. Funded by a tax on employee earnings and matching employer contributions, Medicare and Medicaid enrollments reached approximately 20 million within a year and today benefit more than 130 million poor, disabled, and senior Americans.

Photo courtesy of the Social Security Administration.

U.S. Census Bureau Director Simon N.D. North and the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906

Census Bureau Director Simon N.D. North On July 10, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt named Census Bureau director Simon N.D. North as the Department of Commerce and Labor's representative to a panel tasked with developing regulations for the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.

The 1906 Act, inspired by Upton Sinclair's account of the meat packing industry in The Jungle, established regulations to protect America's food supply. The rules developed by Director North's panel protected consumers from adulterated or mislabeled food and drugs and directed the U.S. Bureau of Chemistry (the Food and Drug Administration today) to establish inspection protocols and prosecute offenders.


Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Census History Staff | Last Revised: December 05, 2014