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Apportionment

Apportionment Legislation 1790 - 1830

  • An Act Apportioning House Seats for Kentucky and Vermont (February 25, 1791) Download PDF [75KB PDF]
    • Temporarily apportioned two House seats each for the newly admitted states of Kentucky and Vermont, until their populations were included in the upcoming post-census reapportionment.
  • An Act Providing for Apportionment following the 1790 Census (April 14, 1792) Download PDF [73KB PDF]
    • Increased the ratio from the one House member for every 30,000 residents, the proportion set by the Constitution, to one for every 33,000 residents; there were 105 seats in the House of Representatives. Apportioned seats among the states using the Jefferson method.
  • An Act Providing for Apportionment following the 1800 Census (January 14, 1802) Download PDF [65KB PDF]
    • The ratio remained one House member for every 33,000 residents, although the size of the House of Representatives was increased to 142 seats. Seats were apportioned among the states using the Jefferson method.
  • An Act Providing for Apportionment following the 1810 Census (December 21, 1811) Download PDF [75KB PDF]
    • Set a ratio of one representative for every 35,000 residents, with a House size of 181 seats. The Jefferson method was used to apportion seats.
  • An Act Apportioning Seats for Maine (April 7, 1820) Download PDF [72KB PDF]
    • Divided Massachusetts's House delegation so that those who had represented the territory of the new state of Maine now comprised Maine's House delegation. In the elections of 1820, Massachusetts was to elect thirteen representatives, and Maine was to elect seven.
  • An Act Providing for Apportionment following the 1820 Census (March 7, 1822) Download PDF [333KB PDF]
    • Set the ratio to one representative for every 40,000 residents. The size of the House of Representatives is increased to 213 seats, and the apportionment was made, once again, using the Jefferson method. The 1820 reapportionment was the first time states lost House representation in absolute terms.
  • An Act Amending 1820 Apportionment (January 14, 1823) Download PDF [63KB PDF]
    • Awarded Alabama an additional (third) seat in the House of Representatives.
  • An Act Providing for Apportionment following the 1830 Census (May 22, 1832) Download PDF [69KB PDF]
    • Set the ratio to one member of Congress for every 47,700 residents. Increased the size of the House of Representatives to 240 seats. The Jefferson method was again used to apportion seats among the states, but delegation from the smaller states, led by John Quincy Adams of Massachusetts, strenuously objected and pushed for the Webster method to be used instead.

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Source: U.S. Census Bureau | Census History Staff | Last Revised: November 01, 2012