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Trends in Congressional Apportionment

Component ID: #ti1578173595

Activity Description

Students will examine a 2010 Census brief to understand the apportionment process and to analyze the relationship between a state’s population and its number of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, making calculations with a multistep formula. Students will also identify trends in congressional apportionment.

Component ID: #ti501372300

Suggested Grade Level

9-10

Component ID: #ti501372301

Approximate Time Required

45-60 minutes

Component ID: #ti501372302

Learning Objectives

  • Students will be able to understand how to calculate a state’s number of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.
  • Students will be able to identify trends in congressional apportionment.
  • Students will be able to analyze the relationship between population and apportionment to understand the distribution of congressional power in the United States.

Component ID: #ti501372303

Materials Required

  • The student version of this activity, 11 pages; it contains images that should be printed in color.
  • Calculators

A teacher computer with Internet access and a projector to display web sites are optional.

Component ID: #ti501372304

Activity Item

The following item is part of this activity. The item, its source, and instructions for viewing it online appear at the end of this teacher version.

  • 2010 Census Brief — Congressional Apportionment

Teacher Notes

Blooms Taxonomy

Analyzing
Blooms Taxonomy

Students will analyze a Census Bureau document containing data tables, a map, and a graph to understand the relationship between the U.S. population and the apportionment of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Subject

High School History

Topics

  • Apportionment
  • Choropleth maps
  • Political representation
  • U.S. House of Representatives

Skills Taught

  • Comparing time periods
  • Identifying cause and effect
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