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Groundhog Day: February 2, 2022

Release Number CB22-SFS.12
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Groundhog Day Forecasts and Climate History, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Centers for Environmental Information:

“Every February 2, a crowd of thousands gathers at Gobbler’s Knob in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, to await a special forecast from a groundhog named Phil. If the 20-pound groundhog emerges and sees his shadow, the United States can expect six more weeks of winter weather according to legend. But, if Phil doesn’t see his shadow, we can expect warmer temperatures and the arrival of an early spring.

“Even though he’s been forecasting since 1887, Phil’s track record for the entire country isn’t perfect. To determine just how accurate he is, we’ve compared U.S. national temperatures with Phil’s forecasts. On average, Phil has gotten it right 50% of the time over the past 10 years.”

Key Stats

From QuickFacts: statistics for all states and counties, and for cities and towns with a population of 5,000 or more.

Note: The dashboard image above is cropped at the bottom. Click on the image for the full QuickFacts page and to alternate between “Dashboard,” “Table,” “Map,” or “Chart.”

QuickFacts data are derived from: Population Estimates; American Community Survey; Census of Population and Housing; Current Population Survey; Small Area Health Insurance Estimates; Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates; State and County Housing Unit Estimates; County Business Patterns; Nonemployer Statistics; Economic Census; Survey of Business Owners; and Building Permits.

More Stats

Source: 2019 American Community Survey (ACS), 1-Year Estimates.

Note: The origin of Groundhog Day comes from German immigrants.

From data.census.gov – Explore Census Data:

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