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Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2017

Release Number CB17-FF.17
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*NOTE: Statistics from the American Community Survey (ACS) will be updated in September.

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In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. In 1989, Congress expanded the observance to a month long celebration (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) of the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

Sept. 15 is the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

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57.5 million

The Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2016, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority. Hispanics constituted 17.8 percent of the nation’s total population.

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1,131,766

The number of Hispanics added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2015, and July 1, 2016. This number is more than half of the approximately 2.2 million people added to the nation’s total population during this period.

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2.0%

The percentage increase in the Hispanic population between 2015 and 2016.

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119 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States in 2060. According to this projection, the Hispanic population will constitute 28.6 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

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63.2%

The percentage of those of Hispanic or Latino origin in the United States who were of Mexican origin in 2016. Another 9.5 percent were Puerto Rican, 3.8 percent Salvadoran, 3.9 percent Cuban, 3.3 percent Dominican and 2.5 percent Guatemalan. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American, or other Hispanic or Latino origin. The percentage of those of Salvadoran and of Cuban descent are not statistically different from each other.

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States and Counties

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10.9 million

The estimated population for those of Hispanic origin in Texas as of July 1, 2016.

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9

The number of states with a population of 1 million or more Hispanic residents in 2016 — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Texas.

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54.4%

The number of states with a population of 1 million or more Hispanic residents in 2016 — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Texas.

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15.3 million

The Hispanic population of California. This was the largest Hispanic population of any state in 2016.

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4.9 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County. This was the largest Hispanic population of any county in 2016.

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39,600

Harris County in Texas had the largest numeric increase of Hispanics from 2015 to 2016.

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Families and Children

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16.7 million

The number of Hispanic households in the United States in 2016.

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48.0%

The percentage of Hispanic households that were married-couple households in 2016. Among all households in the United States, 47.9 percent were married-couple households.

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57.5%

The percentage of Hispanic married-couple households that had children younger than age 18 present in 2016, whereas for all married-couple households it was 39.5 percent.

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67.2%

The percentage of Hispanic children that lived with two parents in 2016, whereas for all children it was 68.7 percent.

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Spanish Language

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40 million

The number of U.S. residents age 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2016. This is a 133.4 percent increase since 1990 when it was 17.3 million. Those who hablan español en casa constituted 13.3 percent of U.S. residents age 5 and older. More than half (59.0 percent of all Spanish speakers and 57.5 percent of Hispanic Spanish speakers) spoke English “very well.”

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72.4%

The percentage of Hispanics age 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2016.

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Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

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$47,675

The percentage of Hispanics age 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2016.

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19.4%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2016.

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16.0%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2016.

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Education

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67.1%

The percentage of Hispanics age 25 and older that had at least a high school education in 2016.

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15.3%

The percentage of the Hispanic population age 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2016.

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5 million

The number of Hispanics age 25 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2016.

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1.6 million

The number of Hispanics age 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2016 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

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17.4%

The percentage of students (both undergraduate and graduate) enrolled in college in 2016 who were Hispanic.

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24.7%

The percentage of students who were Hispanic of the total enrolled in kindergarten through 12th grade in 2016.

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Foreign Born

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34.2%

The percentage of the Hispanic population that was foreign-born in 2016.

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62.4%

The percentage of the 22.3 million noncitizens who were born in Latin America and the Caribbean and were living in the United States in 2011-2015

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Jobs

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67.3%

The percentage of Hispanics or Latinos age 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2016.

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21.2%

The percentage of civilian employed Hispanics or Latinos age 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations in 2016.

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Voting

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9.2%

The percentage of voters in the 2016 presidential election who were Hispanic. Hispanics comprised 4.7 percent of voters in 1996.

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7.3%

The percentage of voters in the 2014 congressional election who were Hispanic.

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Serving our Country

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1.2 million

The number of Hispanics or Latinos age 18 and older who are veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

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Business

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312,738

The estimated number of Hispanic-owned employer firms nationally in 2015, up from 298,563 or 4.7 percent from 2014.

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$61.2 billion

The estimated sales/receipts reported by Hispanic employer firms owned by women in 2015. Male-owned Hispanic employer firms reported sales of $264.2 billion.

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The following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:

African-American History Month (February)
Super Bowl
Valentine's Day (Feb. 14)
Women's History Month (March)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/
      St. Patrick's Day (March 17)
Earth Day (April 22)
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)
Older Americans Month (May)
Mother's Day
Hurricane Season Begins (June 1)
Father's Day
The Fourth of July (July 4)
Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)
Back to School (August)
Labor Day
Grandparents Day
Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Unmarried and Single Americans Week
Halloween (Oct. 31)
American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month (November)
Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
Thanksgiving Day
The Holiday Season (December)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.

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