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Surveys and Programs Contributing to Hispanic Origin

Component ID: #ti2107442282

Listed below are the two surveys and one census that provide Census Bureau’s statistics on Hispanic Origin. Following a general description of each program are specifics related to this topic.

Component ID: #ti1972527717

American Community Survey (ACS)

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an annual, nationwide survey of more than 3.5 million households in the U.S. The ACS is part of the Decennial Census Program and replaces the long form, which the Census Bureau last used during Census 2000. The survey produces statistics on demographic, social, economic, and other characteristics about our nation's population and housing. We release ACS 1-year estimates in September for the pervious calendar year and 5-year estimates in December for the previous five calendar years.

Component ID: #ti1972527710

The American Community Survey is an annual national survey collected monthly which provides communities with reliable and timely demographic, housing, social, and economic data every year.

Component ID: #ti1972527716

Current Population Survey (CPS)

The Current Population Survey (CPS) is the primary source of labor force statistics for the population of the U.S. The Bureau of Labor Statistics sponsors the survey, and the U.S. Census Bureau conducts the data each month. The CPS involves a sample of about 60,000 occupied households. Households are in the survey for four consecutive months, out for eight, and then return for another four months before leaving the sample permanently.

Component ID: #ti1972527711

The Current Population Survey is the largest monthly household survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. This survey was designed to produce results at the national level. The prepared tables herein are at the national level.

Component ID: #ti1972527715

Decennial Census

The decennial census counts every resident in the U.S. once every ten years, in years ending in zero. The Constitution of the United States mandates the head count to make sure each state can fairly represent its population in the U.S. House of Representatives. States use the numbers to draw their legislative districts. The federal government uses them to distribute funds and assistance to states and localities.

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