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Questions by Data Source:

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EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS Data) Questions

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In this Section:

  1. Why does the Census Bureau produce the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  2. What are the characteristics shown in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  3. What geographic levels are available for this tabulation?
  4. Compared to the Census 2000 Tabulation, what is new this time?
  5. What is the American Community Survey (ACS) 2006-2010 5-year data file?
  6. How can I access the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  7. How can I download the data from American FactFinder?
  8. What is the difference between Census 2000 data and American Community Survey (ACS) estimates?
  9. Why was the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) released in 2012 when the data were collected between 2006 and 2010?
  10. What is "worksite geography"?
  11. What is "residence geography"?
  12. What are "worksite flows"?
  13. What are “county sets”?
  14. How can I access data by “county set” geography?
  15. Does the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?
  16. What is the Relevant Civilian Labor Force (RCLF)?
  17. What race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) categories are included in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  18. What is the definition of ethnicity?
  19. What is the definition of citizenship?
  20. What is the definition of earnings?
  21. Are earnings data adjusted for inflation?
  22. Do the occupations on the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) match the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)?
  23. Why do some tables in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contain 488 occupational categories and other tables contain 487?
  24. Do the industries on the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) match the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)?
  25. How do the industry and occupation classifications for the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) compare to the ones used in the Census 2000 Special EEO File?
  26. Were all geographies released at once?
  27. Is Puerto Rico included in the National (United States) geography level tables?
  28. How do I get the data for all occupations for a particular geography?
  29. What is the difference between tables EEO-ALL01R/EEO-ALL01W and EEO-ALL02R/EEO-ALL02W?
  30. What is the definition of “unemployed” (Census occupation code 9920) for the residence tables?
  31. Do disclosure rules apply to the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  32. What additional rules apply to this tabulation?
  33. What are the margins of error?
  34. Is the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) available on CD-ROM or DVD?
  35. How can I access the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) release webinar from November 28th, 2012?
  36. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  37. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?
  38. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?
  39. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs at the Department of Labor?
  40. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Office of Personnel Management?
  41. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?
  42. Who should I contact regarding questions from state and local governments or organizations required to complete an EEOP?
  43. Who should I contact regarding questions from employers required to complete an EEO-1, EEO-3, EEO-4 and EEO-5 form?
  44. Who should contractors contact for questions regarding Affirmative Action Plans (AAP)?
  45. Why are there different occupation categories or groups in the EEO Tabulation?
  46. When will the next release for the EEO Tabulation be?
  47. What is a core based statistical area (CBSA)?
  48. Error in Estimates for Hawaii Geographies in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010
  49. Why are the table identification numbers from Table Set 7 different from other table sets?
  50. Which are the military-specific occupations?
  51. How do I save or e-mail a link to an EEO Tabulation table on American FactFinder?
  52. In preparing a workforce chart for the EEOP Utilization Report, how does a recipient that is a state or local government agency decide which of the eight major job categories used in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) is the appropriate classification for a particular job title?
  53. Is there technical assistance for Federal agencies in using the 2006-2010 American Community Survey (ACS) Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tabulation?

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1. Why does the Census Bureau produce the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

The Census Bureau produces the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) for Federal agencies responsible for monitoring employment practices and enforcing civil rights laws in the workforce, and for all employers so they can measure their compliance with the laws. The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) serves as the primary external benchmark for conducting comparisons between the racial, ethnic, and sex composition of each employer's workforce to its available labor market.

  • The following four agencies sponsor this tabulation-
    • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    • Department of Justice’s Employment Litigation Section of the Civil Rights Division
    • Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
    • Office of Personnel Management

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2. What are the characteristics shown in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

The tables in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) provide data about the labor force by sex, race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) crosstabulated by detailed occupations, EEO Occupational Groups, EEO-1 Job Categories, Federal Sector Job Groups, State and Local Government Job Groups, educational attainment, younger and older age groups, earnings, industry, citizenship, and unemployment status by residence geography, worksite geography, and commuter flows.

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contains information similar to comparable tabulations based on the 1970, 1980, 1990 and 2000 censuses.

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3. What geographic levels are available for this tabulation?

These tables are shown for five geographic levels: nations, states, metropolitan areas, counties, and places.

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4. Compared to the Census 2000 Tabulation, what is new this time?

This is the first time the file is produced using American Community Survey (ACS) data. In addition, it is the first time the tabulation provides pre-calculated margins of error for every estimate and percentage. The tabulation provides data by citizenship and unemployment status for the first time. Furthermore, the U.S. total and state geographies are available for worksite tables and the tabulation provides data on Puerto Rico as part of the geographic iterations. The tabulation provides data for 487 detailed occupational categories based on the new 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC). A crosswalk between Census 2000 occupation categories used in the 2000 EEO tabulation and the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 occupation categories is available on the Guidance page.

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5. What is the American Community Survey (ACS) 2006-2010 5-year data file?

The American Community Survey (ACS) produces period estimates of socioeconomic and housing characteristics. It is designed to provide estimates that describe characteristics of an area over a specific time period. In the case of ACS one-year estimates, the period is the calendar year. While a one-year estimate includes information collected continuously nearly every day from independent monthly samples over a 12-month period, a five-year estimate includes statistics collected over a 60-month period. Then we aggregate the results over the specified period of time. For example, the 2006-2010 ACS five-year estimates describe the population and housing characteristics of an area for the period January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2010. They do not describe any specific day, month, or year within that time period. The cumulative sample of the ACS taken over a five-year time period allows measurement of detailed characteristics in local geographies and increases precision of its estimates.

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6. How can I access the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) is available through American FactFinder, the Census Bureau’s online statistics search tool.

Characteristics include sex, race, and ethnicity (Hispanic origin), crosstabulated by citizenship, occupation, industry, age, educational attainment, earnings, and unemployment status.

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7. How can I download the data from American FactFinder?

When viewing a table, from the Table Viewer section, click the Download button on the Actions toolbar. The download options are divided into the following categories and formats:

  • Database Compatible Format: Use this advanced download format to display data that can be loaded into a database for further analysis.
    • CSV: Data and annotations in a single file: Displays a single .csv file containing both data cells and annotations. This CSV style is better for viewing and manipulating the data in spreadsheet software, such as Excel.
  • Presentation Ready Format: For the EEO Tabulation, ONLY use this format to display a table that is easy to read and insert into documents or presentations.
    • XLS:. The XLS file type is the common file format associated with Microsoft Excel. In American FactFinder, download a print-friendly view of a table or map to maintain the visual formatting of the data product in XLS.

Once the data user selects a format, a dialog window displays the progress as American FactFinder builds a file containing the product selected for download. When American FactFinder displays "Your file is complete", click Download. The browser then displays a dialog window allowing the data user to open or save the zip file. This dialog window will vary depending on the Internet browser used.

When downloading large amounts of data, users should use the Download Center on American FactFinder. Access the Download Center from the American FactFinder Main Page by clicking 'Download Center' in the global menu, or by clicking the Download Center section, then clicking the Download Center button. It is best to open the download center in Mozilla Firefox. Tabular data downloaded using the 'Dataset and Table' path are formatted as database-compatible comma-delimited (.csv) files packaged together in a single zip file.

Next, select a program and dataset. Click on the arrow for the drop-down menu, select "EEO Tabulation", and then click on Next. After selecting a program, a list box with the available datasets for that program displays. Select "EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)", and then click on "Add to your Selections". The dataset is added to 'Your Selections'. Notice that the 'Tables matching your selections' below the dataset name shows how many tables are available based on the items contained in 'Your Selections'. Only one data set can be selected. Click the 'Next' button to continue.

To select geographies, click on the arrow for the dropdown menu, then select Geography. The Download Center allows the data user select a single group of geographies, such as all states in the United States or all counties in Alabama. Begin by selecting the type of geography. Notice that not all geographic types are available in the geographic type dropdown box (some of them are grayed out). In this case, the data user selected dataset may not contain data for all of the listed geography types. Click the 'Next' button to continue. To return to the previous step, click on the 'Previous' button. The Search Result page shows the tables that match the search criteria (the dataset and geographies added to 'Your Selections'). Entering a topic, table name, or table number in the 'Refine your search results' text box can further refine the search results. Click the check boxes to select one or more tables to download. Use page arrows to move between pages of search results.

A total of 40 tables can be downloaded at one time. Click the 'Download' button or the 'Next' button to continue. The tables and geographies you've selected are displayed in the download confirmation dialog box. The download will include descriptive names for the cells within the selected tables. If you do not want these descriptive names in your download, deselect the 'Include descriptive data element names' check box. Click 'OK' to begin the download. The download progress dialog should appear. Note that it may take several minutes or hours to create the file depending on the size and complexity of your download request. After the download file has been created on American FactFinder, the Download button becomes active. Click the Download button to download the file to your computer. Note that once the download process is complete you have 30 minutes to download the file to your computer. American FactFinder times out after 30 minutes of inactivity.

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8. What is the difference between Census 2000 data and American Community Survey (ACS) estimates?

Data users can compare American Community Survey (ACS) 1-year, 3-year or 5-year estimates with Census 2000 data. Differences in the universe, question wording, residence rules, reference periods, and the way in which the data are tabulated can impact comparability with Census 2000.

The Census Bureau collects ACS data from a sample of the population in the United States and Puerto Rico, comparable to what the decennial Census long-form sample collected for social and economic variables. The ACS sample is slightly smaller than what the decennial census sample used to be for these variables. All ACS data are survey estimates. To help you interpret the reliability of the estimate, the Census Bureau publishes a margin of error (MOE) for every ACS estimate.

ACS 1-, 3-, and 5-year estimates are period estimates, which means they represent the characteristics of the population and housing over a specific data collection period. Data are combined to produce 12 months, 36 months or 60 months of data. Decennial Census data are point-in-time estimates, which means that they are a snapshot of the population on April 1.

For guidance, data users can access the ACS Compass handbooks.

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9. Why was the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) released in 2012 when the data were collected between 2006 and 2010?

The 2006-2010 5-year ACS dataset was the most recent 5-year dataset available at the time of release on November 29, 2012.

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10. What is "worksite geography"?

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) presents data according to where people worked at the time of survey. These tables provide the number of people who were employed “at work,” that is, those who did any work at all during the reference week as paid employees, worked in their own business or profession, worked on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers on a family farm or in a family business in a given county or place.

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11. What is "residence geography"?

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) presents data according to where people lived, regardless of where they worked. These tables include people who were employed at work; employed but not at work, because they were temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation, or other personal reasons; and the unemployed, who were actively looking for work in the last four weeks and available to start a job, whose last job was not a military-specific job.

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12. What are "worksite flows"?

The worksite flows focus on where people work (worksite) and provide additional information on where people commute from (place of residence). These are included in tables EEO 1w through EEO 7w. Worksite flows include county and place flows.

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13. What are “county sets”?

County Sets are counties that have been aggregated because one or more of the counties in the county set did not have a residence population of 50,000 or more. The aggregated counties in a county set have a population of 50,000 or more. County sets are only available for table EEO-ALL01R-EEO 1r. Detailed Census Occupation by Sex and Race/Ethnicity for Residence Geography. The counties within each county set are contiguous, and do not cross state lines.

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14. How can I access data by “county set” geography?

Note that county sets are ONLY available for table EEO 1r. Detailed Census Occupation by Sex and Race/Ethnicity for Residence Geography.

To obtain data by county set geography, you have to go to the Geographies overlay on the left hand side of AFF's Main Page. When you click on the Geographies overlay, you get the Select Geographies box. Click on the arrow on the “Select a geographic type” drop down menu. Select "Equal Employment Opportunity County Set -- 902". The “Select a state” option shows up. Once you select a state, the “Select one or more geographic areas and click Add to your Selections” option appears. Select the county set desired and click on “Add to Your Selections”. Close the Geographies overlay by clicking on close on the top right hand side.

You can also obtain the data by clicking on the Name tab (the default is List) under “Select Geographies”. There are two options under the Name tab to access this geography. Write the name of the county set in the box and it will pop-up, or under the Geography Filter Options you can click on “Summary Level”. There you will see EEO County Set under 902 (you need to scroll down until almost the end) and select 902 - EEO County Set (1,471). All county sets come up under the Geography results list. These are in alphabetical order by state. Once you find the desired county sets, click on the check box and then click on “Add” (next to Selected). Selected county sets will show up on the “Your Selections box” on the top left hand corner of the page.

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15. Does the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?

The EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contains a total for the Civilian Labor Force (CLF) in the residence tables. A total for the CLF is created from the sum of-

  1. the employed who were “at work,” that is, those who did any work at all during the reference week as paid employees, worked in their own business or profession, worked on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers on a family farm or in a family business,
  2. the employed who were “with a job but not at work,” that is, those who did not work during the reference week but had jobs or businesses from which they were temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation, or other personal reasons, and
  3. the unemployed, which includes people who are 16 years old and over who are unemployed, AND have no work experience in the last 5 years; people who have never worked but are looking for work; and people who have worked in the last 5 years but whose last job was in a military-specific occupation and are now looking for work. The occupational code for the unemployed is code 9920, and is only included in the residence tables.

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16. What is the Relevant Civilian Labor Force (RCLF)?

Relevant Civilian Labor Force (RCLF) is the Civilian Labor Force (CLF) data that are directly comparable (or relevant) to the population being considered in the labor force.

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17. What race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) categories are included in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

In this tabulation, there are a total of 15 race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) categories. These are as follows- Hispanic or Latino origin-

1. White alone Hispanic or Latino
2. All other Hispanic or Latino

Not Hispanic or Latino, one race-

3. White alone
4. Black or African American alone
5. American Indian and Alaska Native alone
6. Asian alone
7. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone

Not Hispanic or Latino, two or more races-

8. White and Black
9. White and AIAN
10. White and Asian
11. Black and AIAN
12. NHPI and White (Hawaii only)
13. NHPI and Asian (Hawaii only)
14. NHPI and Asian and White (Hawaii only)
15. Balance of not Hispanic or Latino

The U.S. Census Bureau collects race data in accordance with guidelines provided by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Except for the total, all race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) categories are mutually exclusive. "Black" refers to Black or African American; "AIAN" refers to American Indian and Alaska Native; and "NHPI" refers to Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. The reference to "Hawaii only" indicates that these columns are only tabulated for areas in the state of Hawaii. For tables that do not include Hawaii, these data lines will be populated with an “X”. "Balance of Not Hispanic or Latino" includes the balance of non-Hispanic individuals who reported multiple races or reported Some Other Race alone. For more information on race and Hispanic origin, see the Subject Definitions at on the ACS site.

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18. What is the definition of ethnicity?

The Census Bureau categorizes ethnicity into two categories: Hispanic or Latino OR not Hispanic or Latino. The data on the Hispanic or Latino population were derived from answers to a question that was asked of all people. The terms "Hispanic," "Latino," and "Spanish" are used interchangeably. Some respondents identify with all three terms while others may identify with only one of these three specific terms. Hispanics or Latinos who identify with the terms "Hispanic," "Latino," or "Spanish" are those who classify themselves in one of the specific Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish categories listed on the questionnaire ("Mexican," "Puerto Rican," or "Cuban") as well as those who indicate that they are "another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin." People who do not identify with one of the specific origins listed on the questionnaire but indicate that they are "another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin" are those whose origins are from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Central or South America, or the Dominican Republic. Up to two write-in responses to the "another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin" category are coded.

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19. What is the definition of citizenship?

There are two categories of citizenship used in this tabulation: U.S. citizen and Not a U.S. citizen.

U.S. Citizen – Respondents who indicated that they were born in the United States, Puerto Rico, a U.S. Island Area (such as Guam), or abroad of American (U.S. citizen) parent or parents are considered U.S. citizens at birth. Foreign-born people who indicated that they were U.S. citizens through naturalization also are considered U.S. citizens.

Not a U.S. Citizen – Respondents who indicated that they were not U.S. citizens at the time of the survey. We do not collect data on immigration status.

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20. What is the definition of earnings?

Earnings are defined as the sum of wage or salary income and net income from self-employment. “Earnings” represent the amount of income received for people 16 years old and over before deductions for personal income taxes, Social Security, bond purchases, union dues, Medicare deductions, etc. An individual with earnings is one who has either wage/salary income or self-employment income, or both. Respondents who “break even” in self-employment income and therefore have zero self-employment earnings also are considered “individuals with earnings.”

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21. Are earnings data adjusted for inflation?

Income components were reported for the 12 months preceding the interview month. Monthly Consumer Price Indices (CPI) factors were used to inflation-adjust these components to a reference calendar year (January through December). For example, households interviewed in March 2010 report their income for March 2009 through February 2010. Their income is adjusted to the 2010 reference calendar year by multiplying their reported income by 2010 average annual CPI (January-December 2010) and then dividing by the average CPI for March 2009 - February 2010.

In order to inflate income amounts from previous years, the dollar values on individual records are inflated to the latest year’s dollar values by multiplying by a factor equal to the average annual CPI-U-RS factor for the current year, divided by the average annual CPI-U-RS factor for the earlier/earliest year.

In the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data), earnings are inflation-adjusted to 2010.

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22. Do the occupations on the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) match the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC)?

The occupations in this tabulation are based on the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC), published by the Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget. This classification groups occupations according to the nature of the work performed, and relates these occupations to others of a similar nature. Census occupation codes, based on the 2010 SOC, provide 539 specific occupational categories, for employed people, including military, arranged into 23 major occupational groups. The Census Bureau has adapted the SOC to create the occupation categories used in the American Community Survey (ACS), and shown on the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data). In some cases, the Census categories are groupings of the more detailed SOC categories. As a method of disclosure avoidance, detailed categories are collapsed for occupation. Each category contains at least 10,000 cases nationwide. That is why instead of having the full set of 539 specific occupations, data were published for 488 detailed occupations.

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23. Why do some tables in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) contain 488 occupational categories and other tables contain 487?

The residence tables have 488 occupational categories and the worksite tables have 487 categories. The difference is that residence tables contain a Census occupational category for the unemployed, which includes people who are 16 years old and over who are unemployed, AND have no work experience in the last 5 years; people who have never worked but are looking for work; and people who have worked in the last 5 years but whose last job was in a military-specific occupation and are now looking for work (Census code 9920). People in this category have a place of residence but no worksite.

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24. Do the industries on the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) match the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)?

The 2007 Census industry classification was developed from the 2007 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) published by the Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget. The NAICS was developed to increase comparability in industry definitions between the United States, Mexico, and Canada. It provides industry classifications that group establishments into industries based on the activities in which they are primarily engaged. The NAICS was created for establishment designations and provides detail about the smallest operating establishment, while the American Community Survey (ACS) data are collected from households and differ in detail and nature from those obtained from establishment surveys. Because of potential disclosure issues, the Census industry classification system, while defined in NAICS terms, cannot reflect the full detail for all categories that the NAICS provides.

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25. How do the industry and occupation classifications for the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) compare to the ones used in the Census 2000 Special EEO File?

Because of the possibility of new occupations being added to the list of codes, the Census Bureau needed to have more flexibility in adding codes. Consequently, in 2002, census occupation and industry codes were expanded from three-digit codes to four-digit codes. For occupation, this entailed adding a “0” to the end of each occupation code. The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) was revised in 2010. Based on the 2010 SOC changes, Census codes were revised resulting in a net gain of 30 Census detailed occupation codes (from 509 occupations to 539 occupations). Most of these changes were concentrated in information technology, healthcare, printing, and human resources occupations.

The industry classification system developed for Census 2000 was modified in 2002 and again in 2007. This system consists of 269 categories for employed people, including military, classified into 20 sectors. Because of the possibility of new industries being added to the list of codes, the Census Bureau needed to have more flexibility in adding codes. Consequently, in 2002, industry census codes were expanded from three-digit codes to four-digit codes. The changes to these code classifications mean that the ACS data from 2003-2011 are not completely comparable to the data from earlier surveys. In 2007, NAICS was updated again. This resulted in a minor change in the industry data that cause it to not be completely comparable to previous years. The changes were concentrated in the Information sector where one census code was added (6672) and two were deleted (6675, 6692).

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26. Were all geographies released at once?

All states, DC and Puerto Rico were released at once on November 29, 2012.

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27. Is Puerto Rico included in the National (United States) geography level tables?

All National level tables for the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) only include the 50 states and Washington, DC. Puerto Rico is not included at the National level.

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28. How do I get the data for all occupations for a particular geography?

By selecting "Total, all occupations" in the EEO Occupation Codes Overlay, which is represented by Code "0000" in that particular geography.

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29. What is the difference between tables EEO-ALL01R/EEO-ALL01W and EEO-ALL02R/EEO-ALL02W?

The threshold for tables EEO-ALL01R and EEO-ALL01W is 50,000, while tables EEO-ALL02R and EEO-ALL02W include data on citizenship, therefore, have a threshold of 100,000. Also, Table EEO-ALL01R include only county sets, whereas tables EEO-ALL01W, EEO-ALL02R and EEO-ALL02W include counties.

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30. What is the definition of “unemployed” (Census occupation code 9920) for the residence tables?

Code 9920 includes people who are 16 years old and over who are unemployed AND (1) have no work experience in the last 5 years; people who have never worked but are looking for work; and (2) people who have worked in the last 5 years but whose last job was in a military-specific occupation (e.g. military officer) and are now looking for work. People who are unemployed and had an occupation in the last five years (e.g. civilian engineer, military civil engineer) are included in the appropriate occupation and are not in the “unemployed” occupation category. Code 9920 is included only in the residence tables and not included in the worksite or worksite/residence tables.

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Component ID: #ti168278531

31. Do disclosure rules apply to the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

Yes, disclosure rules apply since the Census Bureau must avoid disclosing information about individual respondents of the American Community Survey (ACS). Disclosure avoidance is the process of disguising data to protect confidentiality. A disclosure of data occurs when someone can use published statistical information to identify an individual who provided information under a pledge of confidentiality. Using disclosure avoidance, the Census Bureau modifies or removes all of the characteristics that put confidential information at risk for disclosure. Although it may appear that a table shows information about a specific individual, the Census Bureau has taken steps (such as data swapping) to disguise the original data while making sure the results are useful. Data swapping is designed to protect confidentiality in tables of frequency data (the number or percentage of the population with certain characteristics). Data swapping is done by editing the source data or exchanging records for a sample of cases. A sample of households is selected and matched on a set of selected key variables with households in neighboring geographic areas (geographic areas with a small population) that have similar characteristics (same number of adults, same number of children, etc.). Because the swap often occurs within a geographic area with a small population, there is no effect on the marginal totals for the geographic area with a small population or for totals that include data from multiple geographic areas with small populations. Because of data swapping, users should not assume that tables with cells having a value of one or two reveal information about specific individuals.

Component ID: #ti1980578851
Component ID: #ti415880796

32. What additional rules apply to this tabulation?

TThe disclosure rules listed below were approved by the Census Bureau’s Disclosure Review Board (DRB).

  1. All cells in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) are rounded. The rounding schematic is:
    1. The number "0" remains "0"
    2. The numbers "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", and "7" round to the number "4"
    3. The number "8" or higher numbers round to the nearest multiple of "5" (i.e., 864 rounds to 865, 982 rounds to 980)
    4. Any number that already ends in "5" or "0" stays as is
    5. Any totals or subtotals are constructed BEFORE rounding. This assures that universes remain the same from dataset to dataset.
    6. Cells in a table will NO longer be additive after rounding.
  2. DRB rule states that there must be at least 3 unweighted cases per cell of citizenship, race/ethnicity, and sex (0s can be shown). For the Disability (ACS 3-year) tables, there must be at least 3 unweighted cases per cell of Disability status by race/ethnicity and sex (0s can be shown).
  3. Depending on content, some tables have minimum residence population thresholds for some geographic summary levels, either 50,000 or 100,000. Population thresholds are always based on the residence population, even for tabulations at the worksite geography. Additionally, there must be at least 50 cases per residence-to-worksite commuter flows.

Component ID: #ti758153381
Component ID: #ti54907442

33. What are the margins of error?

A margin of error estimates the magnitude of sampling errors in the American Community Survey (ACS). It is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bound. The Census Bureau provides the margin of error at the 90 percent confidence level for each published ACS estimate. At a 90 percent confidence level, the margin of error indicates that there is a 90 percent probability that the estimate and the population value differ by no more than the value of the margin of error. In other words, we can be 90 percent certain that the range established by the margin of error contains the population value. The ACS employs the Successive Differences Replication (SDR) method to produce variance estimates. Because of the use of these replicate weights, the margin of error published for the EEO tabulation may not match an externally computed margin of error without the use of replicate weights. Margins of error are useful in assessing the reliability of estimates and whether differences between estimates are significant. Both the confidence bounds and the standard error can easily be computed from the margin of error. The standard error for an ACS estimate can be obtained by dividing the published margin of error for the estimate by the value 1.645. See Accuracy at- 2008-2010 & 2006-2010 Multiyear Accuracy (US).

Component ID: #ti365790857
Component ID: #ti195528926

34. Is the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) available on CD-ROM or DVD?

No, this tabulation is available on American FactFinder and on an FTP site. The FTP site contains ASCII files only. Data users can find a SAS program that can be used to convert these files to SAS on the FTP site.

Component ID: #ti2002184521
Component ID: #ti394164458

35. How can I access the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) release webinar from November 28th, 2012?

You can access the webinar at the Census Bureau's Newsroom website.

Component ID: #ti262193525
Component ID: #ti1405054525

36. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

For assistance, please contact the Census Call Center at 1-800-923-8282 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information.

Component ID: #ti1868502607
Component ID: #ti1180197707

37. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?

Lisa R. Moore
Employment Litigation Section
Civil Rights Division
Department of Justice
Phone: 202-514-3831
Fax: 202-514-1105
Lisa.Moore@usdoj.gov

Component ID: #ti765824849
Component ID: #ti912678922

38. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?

Elvira Sisolak
Senior Economist
Research and Analytic Services, OGC
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
131 M Street, NE
Washington, D.C. 20507
Elvira.Sisolak@eeoc.gov
Phone: 202-663-4762
Fax: 202-663-4196
http://www.eeoc.gov/


Morgan Walls-Dines
Social Science Research Analyst
Program Research and Surveys Division, Office of Research, Information, and Planning
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Los Angeles District Office
255 E. Temple Street Fourth Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Morgan.Wallsdines@eeoc.gov
Phone: 213-894-1010
http://www.eeoc.gov/

Component ID: #ti598483179
Component ID: #ti799736257

39. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs at the Department of Labor

Naomi Levin
Branch Chief
Policy Development & Procedures
Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
Department of Labor
levin.naomi@dol.gov
Phone: 202-693-1047

Component ID: #ti1615118303
Component ID: #ti154863815

40. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Office of Personnel Management?

Lance L.Harris
Manager, Data Analysis Group
Office of Planning and Policy Analysis (PPA)
Office of the Director
U. S. Office of Personnel Management
1900 E Street, NW, room 3H30-B
Washington, DC 20415
Lance.Harris@opm.gov
Phone: 202-606-1449
Fax: 202-606-6010
www.opm.gov

Component ID: #ti1818854250
Component ID: #ti978878399

41. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data)?

Industry and Occupation Statistics Branch
U.S. Census Bureau
Phone: 301-763-3239

Component ID: #ti1367689676
Component ID: #ti1302241508

42. Who should I contact regarding questions from state and local governments or organizations required to complete an EEOP?

Joseph Swiderski
US Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
Office of Civil Rights
202-514-8615

Component ID: #ti776463438
Component ID: #ti1645272423

43. Who should I contact regarding questions from employers required to complete an EEO-1, EEO-3, EEO-4 and EEO-5 form?

EOC has a FAQ on completing the EEO-1 Form.

Employer surveys:
EEO-1, EEO-3, EEO-4 and EEO-5 1-866-286-6440
202-663-7185 (FAX)
e1.techassistance@eeoc.gov

EEO process for Federal employees and agencies: 202-663-4599
ofo.eeoc@eeoc.gov

Component ID: #ti593727318
Component ID: #ti1709030673

44. Who should contractors contact for questions regarding Affirmative Action Plans (AAP)?

Contractors needing assistance in developing an AAP should contact the OFCCP field office nearest them. A listing of offices and their contact info can be found on the OFCCP website in the “Contact Us” section.

Component ID: #ti1750921727
Component ID: #ti1232982231

45. Why are there different occupation categories or groups in the EEO Tabulation?

We provide a variety of categories to meet the needs of the government, private sector and research. Please visit our website to learn more about the available options. 

Component ID: #ti767347071
Component ID: #ti386641271

46. When will the next release for the EEO Tabulation be?

The sponsors have determined the next EEO Tabulation release will be by Fall 2020/Spring 2021, which will use the 2014-2018 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) dataset.

Component ID: #ti555272791
Component ID: #ti1917189379

47. What is a core based statistical area (CBSA)?

Standard definitions of metropolitan areas were first issued in 1949 by the then Bureau of the Budget (predecessor of OMB), under the designation "standard metropolitan area" (SMA). The term was changed to "standard metropolitan statistical area" (SMSA) in 1959, and to "metropolitan statistical area" (MSA) in 1983. The term "metropolitan area" (MA) was adopted in 1990 and referred collectively to metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), consolidated metropolitan statistical areas (CMSAs), and primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSAs). The term "core based statistical area" (CBSA) became effective in 2000 and refers collectively to metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas.

The 2000 standards provide that each CBSA must contain at least one urban area of 10,000 or more population. Each metropolitan statistical area must have at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more inhabitants. Each micropolitan statistical area must have at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population.

Federal agencies that use the statistical area definitions for nonstatistical program purposes should note that the 2000 standards changed the terminology used for classifying the areas. Under the 1980 and 1990 standards there were two types of areas: (1) Metropolitan Statistical Areas and (2) Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Areas that consisted of Primary Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The terms “Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area” and “Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area” are now obsolete.

For more information, see the Metropolitan and Micropolitan program and the OMB Bulletin No. 10-02.

Component ID: #ti18810204
Component ID: #ti554365124

48. Error in Estimates for Hawaii Geographies in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010

The Census Bureau has identified errors in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 estimates of the number of people with the following four race and ethnicity categories: not Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander and White; not Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander and Asian; not Hispanic or Latino, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, Asian, and White; and Balance of not Hispanic or Latino, which includes the balance of non-Hispanic individuals who reported multiple races or reported Some Other Race alone. The specification of the estimates referred to an invalid base reference table, resulting in an estimate of zero people in these categories. The percentages for these race and ethnicity categories are correct. These errors exist only on select tables for geographies in Hawaii, including tables EEO-ALL01R and EEO-ALL01W. Once available, we will update this note with the complete list of affected tables.

As a result, we plan to correct and re-release the tables containing these errors.

Errata is located here on the ACS site below.

Component ID: #ti101115121
Component ID: #ti399534188

49. Why are the table identification numbers from Table Set 7 different from other table sets?

Table Set 7 for residence and worksite contains large amounts of data, therefore it is divided at the race/ethnicity categories into the following tables-

EEO-ALL07W-N1, EEO-ALL07R-N1, EEO-ALL07W-P1, and EEO-ALL07R-P1 include:

1. Total, race and ethnicity
2. Hispanic or Latino
3. White alone
4. Black or African American alone
5. American Indian and Alaska Native alone
6. Asian alone
7. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone
8. White and Black
9. White and AIAN
10. White and Asian
11. Black and AIAN

EEO-ALL07W-N2, EEO-ALL07R-N2, EEO-ALL07W-P2, and EEO-ALL07R-P2 include:

12. NHPI and Asian and White (Hawaii only)
13. NHPI and Asian (Hawaii only)
14. NHPI and White (Hawaii only)
15. Balance of not Hispanic or Latino

To get the full set of estimates or percentages, data users have to access both parts of the table. For example, when searching for worksite estimates, access EEO-ALL07W-N1 and EEO-ALL07W-N2. Its corresponding percentages are EEO-ALL07W-P1 and EEO-ALL07W-P2. Due to the separation of the content across two tables, the geographies shown for worksite tables may not be the same for the Part 1 and Part 2 tables.

Component ID: #ti717555731
Component ID: #ti707637281

50. Which are the military-specific occupations?

SOC code                   Census code and title description
  55-1010                      9800-Military officer special and tactical operations leaders
  55-2010                      9810-First-line enlisted military supervisors
  55-3010                      9820-Military enlisted tactical operations and air/weapons specialists and crew members
  no SOC equivalent       9830-Military, rank not specified

Component ID: #ti21377424
Component ID: #ti1948391864

51. How do I save or e-mail a link to an EEO Tabulation table on American FactFinder?

Below are directions to either save the table as a bookmark, send a link to the table, or to save the query on your computer.

Save the Table or Map as a Bookmark or Favorite-

  1. In American FactFinder, click on the Bookmark button in the Actions toolbar above your table.
  2. Click “CREATE BOOKMARK” in the dialog box.
  3. Choose the name and folder location for your bookmark. (The dialog box options may vary depending on the web browser you are using.)
  4. Click “Add”.
  5. The bookmark should be added to your browser's bookmark list.


Send a Link to the Table-

  1. Next to the "Create a Bookmark" button is a link that can be copied and pasted into a document or e-mail.
  2. To copy this link, right click on it and then click "copy."
  3. Open the e-mail or document where you want to paste the link and right-click.
  4. Click "paste" and the link will appear.
  5. When someone clicks the link, the table will open.


In Some Cases the Bookmark Option is Not Available-
When a table has been modified or the bookmark link is too long or complex, the bookmark options are not available. Instead, you will need to save your query. The Save Query function saves the same information that a bookmark saves, but saves it in a separate file (with an .aff extension) on your computer. You can load the file into AFF to recreate the table, or you can e-mail the file to someone.


To Save a Query:

  1. Click Bookmark then click Save Query.
  2. Save the File.
  3. The query is saved to your computer as an .aff file.


To Load a Query

  1. From the American FactFinder Main Page, click “Main” on the navigation bar.
  2. Click the Load Query button.
  3. A Pop-up window allows you to load the saved table.
  4. Click Browse to search for the saved file.
  5. Locate the file and click OK to display the table.

Component ID: #ti1036311275
Component ID: #ti273273060

52. In preparing a workforce chart for the EEOP Utilization Report, how does a recipient that is a state or local government agency decide which of the eight major job categories used in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) is the appropriate classification for a particular job title?

In preparing a workforce chart for an EEOP Utilization Report, a recipient may need to reclassify some jobs in its workforce to correspond with the revised job categories used in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data). For example, to reclassify jobs that were previously classified as Para-Professional, a category that no longer exists, or to reclassify jobs previously designated as simply Protective Services (instead of the new categories of Protective Services Sworn and Protective Services Non-Sworn), one should use the job classifications listed on the U.S. Census Bureau's web site. To access the information from the website, locate the third line from the top of the page, click on the underlined words "State and Local Occupation Groups." The link will lead to the file Occupational Crosswalk to State and Local Government Job Categories. Scrolling downward, find particular job titles listed in the Category Title column, and on the same line for each job title, in the far right column, there is a number that corresponds to one of the eight job categories in the EEO Tabulation 2006-2010 (5-year ACS data) (i.e., one (1) for Officials and Managers, two (2) for Professionals, three (3) for Technicians, four (4) for Protective Services: Sworn, five (5) for Protective Services: Non-sworn, six (6) for Administrative Support, seven (7) for Skilled Craft, and eight (8) for Service Maintenance).

The crosswalk of occupations and its definitions are located below.

Component ID: #ti2038294599

For more questions, contact the Office of Justice Programs at the Department of Justice-

Office of Justice Programs
Department of Justice
810 Seventh Street NW
Washington, DC 20531
Phone: 202-514-2000

Component ID: #ti1301974419
Component ID: #ti584044196

53. Is there technical assistance for Federal agencies in using the 2006-2010 American Community Survey (ACS) Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tabulation?

Yes, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has a technical assistance webpage - Technical assistance for Federal agencies in using the 2006-2010 American Community Survey (ACS) Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Tabulation.

Component ID: #ti1666858058
Component ID: #ti422190591

EEO Census 2000 Tabulation Questions

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In this Section:

  1. Why does the Census Bureau produce a Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  2. What are the characteristics shown in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  3. What is "worksite geography"?
  4. What is "residence geography"?
  5. What are worksite/residence datasets?
  6. Are county data available as in past EEO tabulations?
  7. Will disclosure rules apply to the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation? If yes, what are the basic rules?
  8. Why do some datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain 472 occupational categories and other datasets contain 471?
  9. Will the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation be available to the public?
  10. Why is the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation coming out in 2003 when the data were collected in 2000?
  11. How much did the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation cost to produce?
  12. Does the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?
  13. Are the educational attainment datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation based on Civilian Labor Force data or population data?
  14. Do the occupations on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation match the Standard Occupational Classification System (SOC)?
  15. How do the industry and occupation classifications for Census 2000 compare to the ones used in the 1990 Census?
  16. Why were the industry codes for Census 2000 changed from the SIC to the NAICS?
  17. Which set of occupation codes would I use to develop my Affirmative Action Program (AAP), Affirmative Employment Plan (AEP), and/or Equal Employment Opportunity Plan (EEOP)?
  18. How does NAICS compare to the SIC?
  19. Why was the SOC revised?
  20. How does the new SOC (1998) compare to the old SOC (1980)?
  21. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I want to order the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation CD-ROM?
  22. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?
  23. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?
  24. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?
  25. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Labor?
  26. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the Census 2000 Special EEO file?

Component ID: #ti411851620

1. Why does the Census Bureau produce a Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?

The Census Bureau produces the Census 2000 Special EEO file for those Federal agencies responsible for monitoring employment practices and enforcing civil rights laws in the workforce, and for all employers so they can measure their compliance to the laws. The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation serves as the primary external benchmark for conducting comparisons between the racial, ethnic, and sex composition of each employer's workforce to its available labor market.

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2. What are the characteristics shown in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?

The datasets on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will present data on race and ethnicity cross-tabulated by other variables such as detailed occupations, occupational groups, sex, worksite geography, residence geography, education, age, and industry.

Component ID: #ti1864330058
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3. What is "worksite geography"?

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will present data according to where people worked at the time of Census 2000. These datasets will provide the number of people by occupation, sex, and race and ethnicity who work in a given county or place, who live in the same county or place, and who commute from surrounding counties and places.

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Component ID: #ti1913360088

4. What is "residence geography"?

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation will also present data according to where people lived at the time of Census 2000, regardless of where they worked.

Component ID: #ti1645184884
Component ID: #ti1348319094

5. What are worksite/residence datasets?

The worksite/residence datasets focus on where people work but provide additional information on where people commute from.

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Component ID: #ti724550868

6. Are county data available as in past EEO tabulations?

In order to protect the confidentiality of Census 2000 respondents, EEO tabulations will not provide data for counties of less than 50,000 population (or 100,000 in some instances) when the datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO file contain very detailed information or a large number of cells. For example, for worksite/residence datasets that contain information for 471 or 268 detailed occupational categories, county data will not be available. However, for worksite/residence datasets with more highly aggregated occupational categories, such as the EEO occupational groups, data will be available for all counties.

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7. Will disclosure rules apply to the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation? If yes, what are the basic rules?

Yes, disclosure rules will apply since the Census Bureau must avoid disclosing information about individual respondents in the Census. The disclosure rules listed below were approved by the Census Bureau’s Disclosure Review Board (DRB).

  1. All cells in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation are rounded. The rounding schematic is:
    1. 0 remains 0
    2. 1-7 rounds to 4
    3. 8 or greater rounds to nearest multiple of 5 (i.e., 864 rounds to 865, 982 rounds to 980)
      Any number that already ends in 5 or 0 stays as is.
      Any totals or subtotals needed are constructed before rounding. This assures that universes remain the same from dataset to dataset, and it is recognized that cells in a dataset will no longer be additive after rounding.
  2. If geographic codes are shown, they are Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes where there is a choice of using Census codes or FIPS codes.
  3. Thresholds on universe are normally applied to avoid showing data for very small geographic areas or for very small population groups (often 50 unweighted cases for sample data)

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8. Why do some datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain 472 occupational categories and other datasets contain 471?

The residence-based datasets have 472 occupational categories and the worksite-based and worksite/residence datasets have 471 categories. The difference is because the residence-based datasets contain a Census occupational category for the unemployed with no work experience since 1995 (Census code 992) - people in this category have a place of residence but no worksite.

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9. Will the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation be available to the public?

Yes, the public has access to selected data via the Census 2000 EEO Data Tool or all data by purchasing a CD-ROM (to order call 301-763-INFO (4636)).

Component ID: #ti167163124
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10. Why is the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation coming out in 2003 when the data were collected in 2000?

Basic data tabulations from Census 2000 have priority over this special tabulation; long form data were first released in the summer of 2002.

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11. How much did the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation cost to produce?

The Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation was created through an interagency agreement between a Federal consortium (consisting of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; the Department of Justice, Civil Rights Section; Department of Labor, Office of Federal Contract Compliance; and the Office of Personnel Management) and the Census Bureau. The overall cost is approximately $1,000,000 which is equally divided among the consortium members.

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12. Does the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force and, if so, how is it defined?

The Census 2000 Special EEO file will contain a total for the Civilian Labor Force (CLF). A total for the CLF is created from the sum of (1) the employed, at work during the enumeration week; (2) the employed, not at work during the enumeration week; and (3) the unemployed, including both experienced and new-entrant jobless who were seeking work. The occupational code for the unemployed is code 992.

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13. Are the educational attainment datasets in the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation based on Civilian Labor Force data or population data?

The education, age and earnings datasets are based on labor force data. However, the worksite/residence and worksite datasets do not include the unemployed (Census occupational code 992). The residence datasets do include the unemployed.

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14. Do the occupations on the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation match the Standard Occupational Classification System (SOC)?

The SOC groups occupations according to the nature of the work performed, and relates these occupations to others of a similar nature. There are 23 major groups in the SOC and 821 detailed occupations within those groups. This classification system provides a mechanism for cross-referencing and aggregating occupation-related data collected by social and economic statistical reporting programs. The Census Bureau has adapted the SOC to create the occupation categories used in Census 2000, and shown on the Census 2000 Special EEO file. In some cases the Census categories are groupings of the more detailed SOC categories.

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15. How do the industry and occupation classifications for Census 2000 compare to the ones used in the 1990 Census?

The Census 2000 industry and occupation classifications are completely revised from the ones used in 1990. They are now based on the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and the 1998 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) coding structures. The 1990 system was based on the 1987 Standard Industrial Classification Manual (SIC) and the 1980 Standard Occupational Classification Manual (SOC). To aid data users, crosswalks are available on this website for both the industry and occupation coding systems.

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16. Why were the industry codes for Census 2000 changed from the SIC to the NAICS?

The North American Industry Classification System was developed as a joint effort by Canada, Mexico, and the United States, in order to have common industry definitions. This enables economists and others to compare the industrial statistics produced in each of the three different nations' labor force. For more information on the NAICS, visit the site below. The Census Bureau always uses the most recent standard classification to create its own classification for each census. For this reason it has based the Census 2000 classification on the NAICS rather than on the SIC.

No result found!

Component ID: #ti508771134
Component ID: #ti427003807

17. Which set of occupation codes would I use to develop my Affirmative Action Program (AAP), Affirmative Employment Plan (AEP), and/or Equal Employment Opportunity Plan (EEOP)?

The EEO data file is used by many organizations to develop and update their affirmative action plans. Depending on the level of detail that is required, some organizations use the most detailed occupation codes available (the Census codes) while others may use higher-level aggregations of occupation codes (such as the nine EEO-1 job categories). The Census Bureau created the EEO file according to the sponsors' specifications. Users who need assistance in developing plans and conducting analyses should contact the agency requesting the information. Private companies who are working on their AAP and have questions can contact the Office of Federal Contract Compliance at the Department of Labor by emailing OFCCP-Public@dol.gov. State and local governments and organizations required to complete an EEOP can contact the Department of Justice. Federal agencies can contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission by calling Federal Sector Programs at 202-663-4518. If you have any questions on the EEO data tool or the data itself, call the Census Bureau at 301-763-3239.

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18. How does NAICS compare to the SIC?

There are some differences between the 1997 NAICS and the 1987 SIC, but much of the layout is similar. The user is able to obtain data for more than two thirds of all 4-digit SICs from the new 6-digit NAICS. Either the new NAICS industries are subdivisions of the old SIC industries or the industry definitions have not changed. However, there are some very basic differences between the two. The SIC had only 9 divisions, while the NAICS has 20 sectors. Some of the NAICS sectors were created by splitting SIC divisions.

The NAICS includes advanced technologies and new and emerging industries, which the SIC did not. For example, the NAICS has an information sector not included in the SIC. There is a crosswalk that shows the relationship between SIC and NAICS. If you are interested in a crosswalk showing the relationship between 1990 Census Codes, 2000 Census Codes, and the 1997 NAICS, it is available at:

Component ID: #ti696391979
Component ID: #ti878921988

19. Why was the SOC revised?

The SOC was revised because it had not been updated since 1980. The revision was long overdue because of changes in the labor force and in the way economists view the labor force. Once the revision process was started, the SOC Revision Policy Committee quickly determined that, due to the extent of the changes being proposed, it was necessary to redesign the entire SOC. Visit the Standard Occupational Classification website for more information.

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Component ID: #ti160655112

20. How does the new SOC (1998) compare to the old SOC (1980)?

The old SOC was made up of 22 divisions organized into a 4-digit hierarchical structure. The new SOC uses a 6-digit structure for its occupational categories, divided into 23 major groups which are sometimes called "job families." The general concept behind "job families" is to put all people who work together into the same group regardless of their skill level. So, for example, in the new SOC doctors, nurses, and health technicians are all in the same group instead of in different groups. Similarly, first-line supervisors are in the same groups as the workers they supervise, and helpers are in the same groups as the workers they help.

Component ID: #ti793066408
Component ID: #ti637159367

21. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I want to order the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation CD-ROM?

Marketing Services Office
Bureau of the Census
webmaster@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-INFO (4636)
Fax: 301-457-3842

Component ID: #ti699794316
Component ID: #ti2107006220

22. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have general questions or need additional information about the Census 2000 Special EEO Tabulation?

Statistical Information
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Phone: 301-763-3242
Fax: 301-457-3500

Component ID: #ti136618383
Component ID: #ti118825522

23. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Justice?

Vivian Toler
Employment Litigaion Section
Civil Rights Division
Department of JusticeVivian.B.Toler@usdoj.gov
Phone: 202-514-3835
Fax: 202-514-1105

Component ID: #ti506770618
Component ID: #ti1353953296

24. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission?

Joseph R. Donovan
Director
Research and Analytic Services, OGC
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20507
Joseph.Donovan@eeoc.gov
Phone: 202-663-4745
Fax: 202-663-4196

OR

Marc J. Rosenblum
Chief Economist
Research and Analytic Services, OGC
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
1801 L Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20507
Marc.Rosenblum@eeoc.gov
Phone: 202-663-7110
Fax: 202-663-4196

Component ID: #ti1326754257
Component ID: #ti947341542

25. Whom may I contact if I have questions or need additional information for EEO data related to the Department of Labor?

James C. Pierce
Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
Department of Labor
Pierce.James@dol.gov

Component ID: #ti1493955286
Component ID: #ti327643457

26. Whom may I contact at the Census Bureau if I have technical questions related to the Census 2000 Special EEO file?

Mai Weismantle
Chief
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Mai.Anne.Weismantle@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-3239
Fax: 301-457-3500

OR

Katie Earle
Industry, Occupation, and Statistical Information Branch
Bureau of the Census
Katharine.M.Earl@census.gov
Phone: 301-763-3239
Fax: 301-457-3500

Component ID: #ti1454010044
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