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Decennial Census Historical Facts

1820
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1820

Spain Cedes Florida

1824 Presidential Election

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

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Population

9,638,453 U.S. Resident Population
7.4
Population per square mile of land area
33.1
Percent increase of population from 1810 to 1820
23
Number of States

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The 1820 Census

Cost $209,000
Cost per Capita (cents) 2.2
Total Pages in Published Reports 228
Number of Enumerators 1,188
Census Bureau Director John Quincy Adams
Number of Questions on the Questionnaire 7
Number of Questions on the Long Form N/A

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10 Largest Urban Places

Rank
Place
Population
1
New York City, NY 123,706
2
Philadelphia, PA 63,802
3
Baltimore, MD 62,738
4
Boston town, MA 43,298
5
New Orleans, LA 27,176
6
Charleston, SC 24,780
7
Northern Liberties township, PA 19,678
8
Southwark district, PA 14,713
9
Washington, DC 13,247
10
Salem town, MA 12,731

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Pop Culture

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  • Colonel Robert Gibbon Johnson proves that tomatoes are not poisonous by eating one in public on September 28, 1820.
  • On November 20, 1820, the Nantucket, MA, whaling ship Essex sinks after being attacked by a sperm whale. The event inspires Herman Melville's 1851 novel, Moby Dick.
  • The Adams-Onís Treaty is ratified in 1821, in which Spain ceded Florida to the United States in exchange for America's renunciation of any claims on Texas following the Louisiana Purchase and $15 million.
  • The Saturday Evening Post is published for the first time as a weekly newspaper on August 4, 1821.
  • During his State of the Union Address on December 2, 1823, President James Monroe introduces the "Monroe Doctrine" declaring that European attempts to recolonize the Americas would be considered a hostile act towards the United States.
  • On March 11, 1824, Ely S. Parker of the Seneca tribe becomes the director of the newly created Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  • Although Andrew Jackson wins the popular vote, the 1824 presidential election is decided by the U.S. House of Representatives when none of the four candidates (John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay) wins a majority of the electoral votes. The House chooses Adams on February 9, 1825.
  • The first boat leaves Buffalo, NY, enroute to New York City via the Erie Canal on October 26, 1825.
  • Samuel Morey patents the internal combustion engine (named the "Gas or Vapor Engine") on April 1, 1826.
  • Thomas Jefferson and John Adams die on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
  • The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad incorporates - becoming the first railroad in the United States to offer transportation for people and commercial goods - on February 28, 1827.
  • In 1829, Presbyterian minister Reverend Sylvester Graham develops "Dr. Graham's Honey Biskets," later known as "Graham Crackers."
  • The Smithsonian Institution is founded in 1829 when British scientist James Smithson bequeaths $500,000 for its initial funding.

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